Ram Video Showcases 2014 HD Hemi, Coil Springs

Ram 6.4 Hemi II

Ram Truck chief engineer Mike Cairns walks us around the new multidisplacement 6.4-liter Hemi V-8 on the coming 2014 Ram 2500 and explains what’s new on the segment-exclusive three-quarter-ton pickup’s coil spring suspension. This is the just the latest in a series of videos Ram Truck created (the last one we showed was on EcoDiesel) to try to get the word out about all the changes coming on the 2014 heavy-duty pickup trucks. We expect to see videos about the new airbag suspension and stronger Cummins engine as well.

 

 

 

Comments

Nice...can wait to read about the recalls!

Sounds pretty good. No mpg #'s? I echo the concerns regarding the unprecedented rash of recent recalls.

What the heck is up with all those recalls?! From the emortal words from that old Popeye movie - they owe the world an apology!

Ram is wise to put these types of product technology materials out, especially via YouTube. The manufacturers don't do enough to explain their technology, but I think that's especially true of Ram.

If everyone looking at a Ram truck knew how much engineering and design went into these things, they wouldn't be so quick to assume "EcoBust" is the game-changer that Ford's advertising says it is...

Ecoboost is a marketing ploy just like Hemi is for Ram. Is the Ecoboost really Eco, not not really it does have some extra power but mileage is about the same but advirtise V6 fuel economy with V8 power and people will buy it.

@Mark Williams
You said "We expect to see videos about the new airbag suspension and stronger Cummins engine as well." Are you expecting a video on the 2013 High Output Cummins are a higher 2014 number which I can't see how? I think the 2013 High Output Cummins has been covered we know what physical changes were made to allow that to happen and they got their well deserved credit for it.

interesting that they would take the risk of putting the coils in the 3/4 ton, but not the 1 ton. Wonder what the sales breakout is. One huge issue with the panard bar is that when the suspension is compressed, it is shifted to the side, so the frame and rear axle are now offset. wonder how they compensated for that? Also, given time, the frame WILL rust, now the there are only three welded brackets holding the rear axle instead of 4 spring perches. Wonder how long till we hear of 10 year old trucks with the axles breaking off on the highway...

Why do you people think coil springs/air bags are a risk? Every 18-wheeler uses the same setup. The solid front axles you guys praise so much use the same setup (It's just turned around 180 degrees.) and no one compains. Put it on the rear, and OMGFTWILULOLROTFLMAOSP?

It's stupid.

Coils have done just fine in the half-tons, it's done just fine on the Long Hauler concept and Kelderman suspension set ups (air bags, not coils, but same mechanical principles), it's done just fine on the full-size GM SUVs also. No one bitches about those. It's not a risk, it's smart.

Coils (and the optional air bags) will smooth out the ride, increase payload and towing capacity, and allow for greater amounts of power to actually be put down to the ground. It's a win no matter how you look at it. And now all those Bro's out there in their Affliction t-shirts can have a nice, comfortable ride in their HD truck that *MIGHT* haul a 4-wheeler every once in a while. They're gonna love it! The sales of Bro Trucks alone would be enough to warrant this change.

A properly engineered panhard bar will have such a large radius of curvature, that the arc the axle travels over it's extension will be very hard to notice. Lateral movement will be almost unnoticable in a properly designed system.

Should have gone to an independent front suspension as well.

If I were in the market for a 3/4 ton truck right now, I would consider the rear air suspension a huge plus- the truck can ride soft as can be when its empty, but will hold any load right up to the max in the preset ride height. Chrysler has been building coil spring suspensions w/ 6k axle weight ratings (for Cummins powered 4x4s) for years. This is simple, by comparison.
The suspension changes do make for several configurations no:
Coil 5-link front, Coil or Air rear in 2500
Coil 5-link front, leaf spring rear in SRW 3500
Coil Radius arms, leaf springs in the DRW 3500.
I don't recall an announcement over front airbags or rear bags for the leaf-sprung trucks, but it would make sense for especially the Duallies.
@ T-bone
"Wonder how long till we hear of 10 year old trucks with the axles breaking off on the highway..."
I would say at least 10 years (logically, right?) but remember that those mounts don't carry the load. Also, the axle would probably move long before you run risk of spitting it out. Visual inspection should keep everything in the clear.

I like that Ram does these videos, I am not in the market for a 3/4 ton (but the 1/2 with eco-deisel is a maybe), but letting us know more about the thought process behind the truck and the people behind the truck lets us know things about the vehicle you cannot really put on paper.

Of course some things you can assume from the paper: the coil spring 3/4tons aren't for heavy duty work trucks, its for consumers who tow a 5th wheel a few times a year and then use the truck as a car the rest of the time. Still, thats a lot more innovative and forward thinking than "Leaf Springs for all!!!"

@simcik

"Every 18-wheeler uses the same setup" - False, most use a heavyduty leaf set up with a helper air bag, the cab and chair ride solely on air. Some are heading to full air but I bet the hesitation is not having a back up and how a small problem can cause a big one...

"Coils (and the optional air bags) will smooth out the ride, increase payload and towing capacity, and allow for greater amounts of power to actually be put down to the ground. It's a win no matter how you look at it."

Smooth out the ride yes, increase payload and towing capacity, false... Oh wait it did increase the towing and payload on the Dodges, oh wait no it didn't, they are still behind even the tundra. I do agree they can help put the power to the ground better.

I think a full air suspension is stupid, too much can go wrong and is too vulnerable. How many times do you see truckers having air problems on their rigs from leaks to frozen lines and I am sure probably cut bags.

Don't get me wrong, I think a air bag as a helper bag is a hell of an idea and should be offered on all trucks from the factory, but not as a stand alone.

Why don't they get crap for having air suspension on the GM SUV's? They aren't designed to tow a ton, somewhere less than 9000lbs. Then they also aren't getting 2000lbs thrown just over the rear axle. Two completely different situations. The pickup owner is 1000's of times more likely to overload their truck, take it off road or tow something very heavy, hence the reason a vulnerable air bag as your sole spring is a bad idea.

@Hank: EcoBoost *as a name* may be a marketing ploy, but as you said yourself, they are realizing more horsepower out of a V6, putting it roughly into the class of a small V8. What they're trying not to do is put so much boost into it that it detonates the engine or burns itself up as so many older turbo engines did (more due to operator ignorance and error than to any fault in the turbo itself). As such, the concept is just as valid as the Hemi technology which is based more on the hemispherical shape of the heads than any specific design of the engine block. Yes, Chrysler still owns the trademark on the Hemi name and as such will continue to use it as a marketing tool.

Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!

@Tyler: Your prejudice is apparently overriding fact.
In all actuality, modern 18-wheeler trucks are using coils springs, not leaf springs if any at all supporting their air bags. The reasoning was explained quite clearly in the video above as it offers a smoother ride for both driver and load. This also helps to stabilize the vehicle as the weight doesn't make sudden shifts even on a swaybacked road (once known as Turtleback) as the springs flex and relax.

Of course, as a result this can improve load carrying capability as the weight of the load is spread out over more of the frame and not just on one or two points the way leaf springs do. The real difference is not in the load capacity, but rather the cost vs reliability, as leaf springs tend to last a long, long time (when not constantly overloaded) and air bags would need relatively frequent (though less expensive) replacement. I'm sure many of us have seen how the air bags are often positioned in the middle of the coils, getting their support from those coils while also unloading them significantly.

As for towing and loading by and of SUVs and pickup trucks, I personally see far more SUVs grossly overloaded than I do pickups. While pickups can and do carry hideously outsized, bulky items like tires, scrap lumber, logs, etc, I've seen even the Tahoe 1500 practically dragging its rear bumper on the ground carrying something you can't even see through the side glass or packed so high with bags of something that you can't even see through to the other side. Don't even try to tell me I don't see these things.

That doesn't mean that most people now use pickup trucks to tow their RVs; the typical family trailer is 20- to 40-feet long and may weigh anywhere from 3500 pounds to 7500 pounds while the largest fifth-wheelers stretch up to 10,000 pounds. I will see mid-size and larger SUVs towing the 16' to 25' models, but only a few, like the Tahoe again, towing anything larger. The pickup has just become the more convenient vehicle for this as we no longer have Panther-class cars (or the Cadillac 'de Ville series) capable of pulling them. On the other hand, even my Jeep can pull almost any tent trailer and even some of the smaller hard-sided trailers. So again, a pickup is not mandatory, only the more popular towing vehicle for such.

That also blows away your final argument about which is better or worse for what. While I admit that not everybody has yet adopted air bags in place of the older leaf springs, nearly everybody BUT the pickup market has adopted coils springs of ones sort or another over leaf--including some of the heaviest loaders in the market, the railroads. And if you just happen to pay attention, many of those rail cars are now riding on air bags--especially the ones carrying more fragile cargoes.

No matter where my Truck loyalty lies, I like to see "outside the box" thinking. Innovation is what makes the breed better. The last few years we have seen a lot of innovation from two manufactures:
Ram with coil and air suspensions, eight speed transmissions, the Ram box, and now the Eco-diesel in the 1500.
Ford with all new engines in 2011 including the Eco-Boost, six speed trans standard for all engines, and the SVT Raptor.

Regardless of how any of us feel about these ideas and new ways of solving problems this type of thinking makes all of our trucks better.
The GM twins and the new Tundra are probably fine trucks. I just don't see anything on either truck that would be considered a game changer. Too bad.

Yep, GM and Tundra fell short again.

I want good fuel economy with some tow/haul capability. I'm looking forward to the RAM ecodiesel and not much else.

It's official. Just received a message from Chrysler communications. The 2014 Power Wagon will come standard with a 6.4 Hemi V8. This will be my next Ram truck next year. Laramie, sun roof, Alpine, silver, black mickey thompson rims, 37"tires, 4"Mopar lift, 6.4 Hemi, 15,000lb winch to pull chevy and fords, 4.56 gears, black grill,black bumper, maybe a Ram box. :))

I don't care about the ride because they all have good ride. If the coils increased payload he would have said so. He didn't mention payload one time. Not even once.

@Hemiv8, yes recess is over did you not hear the bell? You must now return to class where you can draw some more pictures.

Did he say "best in class ride and handling"?

THe last time I drove a RAM HD it felt like riding on a tractor. They will have to come a long way to claim "best in class"

@sandman 73, That's exactly what he said. Just like the best ride in the 1500 Ram. Class leading!

MORE GUTS

MORE GLORY

MORE CLASS LEADING RAM

Class leading ride is debateable. I remember the Ram had some overstear and ride quality problems with the coils.

I recall the air bags caused a stiffer ride which PUTC didn't like too much.

Another outlet had a check engine light for air bag over-heating.

Flashback:

Off Road 2 gives you just over an inch more ground clearance; unfortunately, it led to a stiffer ride, which we didn’t like too much.

-----

The Ram 1500 was the slowest truck, finishing in 71.62 seconds at an average speed of 31.53 mph and trap speed of 52.43 mph. It seemed to have the most difficult time of the three keeping its coil spring rear end from wallowing around the corners, which would seem counterintuitive because we expected the multilink rear end to be an asset in managing the high lateral forces we put on the trucks. Understeer was also an issue. The front suspension dived noticeably entering tight turns but felt much better through the sweepers.

----

Some of us had very high expectations for the new Dodge Ram’s coil-spring rear running gear. The multilink suspension handles vertical and lateral forces with better control and less friction than the traditional leaf-spring rear ends the other pickups had. It turned out to be the fourth-fastest truck, at 48.94 seconds and 30.03 mph. The Ram handled similarly to the F-150 and Silverado, but with the most oversteer of the three. The front suspension dived noticeably entering the hardest curves. Surprisingly, it was a challenge on some of the corners to keep on the accelerator without the back end breaking loose.

Ken said: "...Yep, GM and Tundra fell short again. I want good fuel economy with some tow/haul capability. I'm looking forward to the RAM ecodiesel and not much else..."

That great to hear Ken...move away from those domestics and get the Fiat. Speaking about being poor and not being able to afford gas...I here the Fiat V6 1500's are great on gas unless you want to tow anything.

But real world gas results are tough with the Fiat 1500's they spend so much time at the Dealer on recalls...who the hell knows what the real world fuel economy is!

Buonasera Ken

@Donald, The Ram rides very well and in comparing it to the competitors it comes across as the best blend of ride and control, whether you're on 17-inch wheels or the big 20s. It goes where you point it without drama, the rear end feels less inclined to step sideways over a mid-turn bump or invoke the stability control, and the Ram has a feeling of good directional stability with a trailer in tow. Steering is direct, but the effort is low during maneuvers and cruising, and it increases nicely as you push the truck harder. Perhaps our best note about the new electric-assist steering is that it feels the same as the previous hydraulic assist, something missing in many such systems, and there is no noise from it. Body roll is kept in check by stabilizer bars at both ends, yet a small amount is apparent as you turn the wheel just to keep you aware (and too much roll stiffness increases ride harshness). In sum, the whole truck exhibits less of the shuddering typical of body-on-frame designs used on all full-size pickups and some big SUVs

The Ram felt smooth and quiet, even on the 20-inch wheels that sing mildly at 50-60 mph. To our ears the Ram has the competition covered, but every ear has its preferences and many pickup owners like noise of different sorts and levels.

"THE RAM HAS THE COMPETITION COVERED"

http://www.newcartestdrive.com/review-drive.cfm?Vehicle=2013_Ram_1500&ReviewID=5201

I would think it would have more power than that! Very disappointing!

@ HEMI V8 Yeah Ram sure does have 3rd place covered.

@johnny, your 2014 slow tie was pulling up the rear in the recent test. LMFAO Your government motors can't hold a candle to that new Ram. It will take Furd and Cheby to tag team with a 9 speed just to compete lol.

HEMI V8 You're Ram's top dog half ton engine with 2 extra gears with 3.55s barely held off a mid pack GM engine with 3.42s with six speed. Watch the new 6.2 GM drive on by you're 2 time government bailed out truck. Have a nice day x)

You know being from the old country it warms my heart to see how you Americans have taken to our Italian Hemi trucks. I think our initial impression of you all being dumb hicks is only partially true...but true nonetheless.

I often see comments on this site that demonstrate that you like the Fiat’s even more than the American trucks like the ECOBUST and the new one from Government Motors.

All I can say is “molte grazie” from your friends in Europe.

@Johnny, I will be waiting......... Just like the G.M. fans for a better truck. lol

@Don aka Lou, Check this out.........

2013 Ram 1500 Rides Like A Mercedes-Benz With Air Suspension

- The Fast Lane Car

Google it. lol

@HEMI V8 You won't have to wait long as the 6.2 is due in fall, and the 5.3 will get a bump in HP and TQ as Ford shows their card next year. Enjoy what little gain Ram as it will all be gone by next year lol! By the way I found the new demographics of 90% of Ram's customers base

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ8IethsyIQ

I could care less johnny. I am getting the one and only Dodge Power Wagon. The original 4x4 in 2014. With the big bad 6.4 Hemi. If history repeats itself. The 5.7 Hemi came first in a 02 2500. Then the 03 1500. The 6.4 Hemi may find it's way into the 1500. I am going HD2500 so makes no difference to me. :))
Off road is where It's at for me.

@Hemi V8, What color are you getting? The 2014 Power Wagon won't be available with air suspension so you won't have to worry about that. Good day to you sir.

I want a silver Power Wagon with black grill, black mickey Thompson rims, mickey thompson Baja claw 37"tires, leather,sunroof,alpine 500 watt stereo,4" Mopar lift, 6.4 hemi, K&N intake,flow master exhaust,cobra 29 cb,led ralley 4000 off road lights behind the front grill. Maybe a Ram box. :)

With Chrysler Group's all-new 6.4-liter HEMI V-8, the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty will deliver to best-in-class horsepower and best-in-class torque among pickups with gasoline engines.

Engineered to deliver capability, durability and bang for the buck, the largest displacement V-8 in its class provides a worthy gas-powered option to the segment's overall standard-bearer – the 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel.

Compelling numbers tell the story of the new 16-valve engine with 410 horsepower (306 kW) at 5,600 rpm and a peak torque rating of 429 lb.-ft. (582 N•m), at 4,000 rpm.

One of the enablers for such performance is an active dual-runner-length intake manifold optimized specifically for the Ram Heavy Duty lineup. The result is improved low-end torque without sacrificing high-end power.

The legendary HEMI architecture provides the foundation of the 90-degree V-8. But its advanced technology is decidedly forward-looking. Cooled exhaust-gas recirculation (CEGR), variable-valve timing (VVT) and Chrysler Group's trademark Fuel Saver cylinder-deactivation technology all contribute to efficiency and help to capitalize on every cubic inch.

The new 6.4-liter HEMI is standard on the 66RFE six-speed automatic transmission.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

I've read some interesting comments on coil sprung suspensions tonight. But coil sprung suspensions have been around for a very long time.

I mean the one about three welds are holding the rear axle secure. Ridiculous. Did you know most engine/transmission setups are secured at three points as well? What if the bolt shears that's securing the engine?

Another one is using the word innovative. Really, pickups are cheap because they aren't innovative. They are frame on chassis vehicles. Cheap to design and produce. Most of the innovation from the motor car is transferred to pickups, so it generally tried and proven years prior as well.

Some of you guys just dribble crap using baseless justification to prove an argument on how your favourite brand is better.

@Big Al from Oz I don't know how much time you've spent in the rust belt of the Northern US/Canada, but trucks rust and rot fast here if not cared for. If one of the tabs for the bolts or if the bolt it self rust inside the bushing where road salt and moister get trapped, it could put more stress on the other rusty bolts/tabs. I could for see a rear axle flying out from under a truck which is more deadly then a broken engine or transmission bolt. Normally you'd hear a loud clunk and have time to stop and check it out if it was a broken engine or transmission mount/bolt, if its a rusted rear axle bolt/tab it could give way with little time to react as the rear axle twist and causes lost of control.

@Johnny Doe
I can't see why manufacturers would have an issue with this. Cars would have the same setup, but with much less strength.

Look at the front end of the Cherokee with the Quadralink suspension, very similar idea. They don't just fall out.

@Hemi V8
A Powerless Wagon would be a piss poor choice for an off road vehicle. Remember the photo of one stuck in the surf?

They are too heavy. The wheelbase is way too long for any serious off roading as well.

They might be good on an icy road, or a logging track in the mountains where the 4x4 can give additional traction. Or even towing on a dirt road where additional traction is required.

I would buy a diesel Grand Cherokee for off roading. It can still tow about 7 500lbs and $hit on the Powerless Wagon off road.

A Grand Cherokee diesel will get you to far more places than a full size pickup.

Why is Ram wasting time with sissy heme gassers? They should drop those poser engines from the HD lineup and use the new 3.0 diesel as the base engine and the CUMMINS as the upgrade. I mean this POS heme even makes less torque than the dead and long gone V10! Bro truck indeed--do the hemes come standard with a flat bill cap?

@bafo
You don't know what Power Wagon is capable of.
It will wipe the floor with Grand Cherokee and go places no one can go.
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xpztiy_driving-a-power-wagon-where-no-pick-up-should-ever-go_auto

@Zviera, little albert is use to driving his mazda,zoom,zoom lol. I guess he is going to $#!^ himself after watching this. Eat your heart out little albert.;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDDYuOb2pbg

Lol, Big Al. Maybe he wants to be able to hold something in the back of the truck? Something you people with 5 feet long beds, and less, over there have no clue about. Maybe if he wanted to put a 4 wheeler atv in the back of it? Picture doing that with a Jeep?

Really, you folks (down under) have payload numbers that so called engineers just "$#!+, and you really think your weak ass little short wheelbase trucks can safely go down the highway at your over rated specs? At highway speeds? Can they stop good? Without loosing control?

A Jeep as you suggest...how would that tow 8-9000 pounds? Have you ever even considered people want a (not useless like yours) bed on the back to throw stuff in, tow stuff.....

Anything the Jeep will pull, a 1500 would tow better.

That being said, if you don't need to put something in a bed, and you tow light, a Jeep would be fine.



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