Ford to Boost Super Duty Production by 15 Percent

Super Duty Line 2 II

Joe Hinrichs, Ford's president of the Americas, recently announced Ford will increase production of its Super Duty pickups at its Kentucky Truck Plant in Louisville by 15 percent, increasing annual production at the facility to about 375,000 units and boosting annual sales by almost 55,000 pickups.

"Customer demand for F-Series Super Duty trucks is growing substantially, and F-Series overall is America's best-selling truck for 37 years running," said Hinrichs in a statement. "Building on more than 100 years of manufacturing in Kentucky, we are proud to expand our profitable growth in the region as a result of our leadership in trucks and SUVs."

Ford will invest about $80 million and add 350 jobs to accommodate the additional capacity at the plant. The Louisville plant makes the Ford F-250, F-350, F-450 and F-550 as well as the Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator full-size SUVs.

The extra capacity puts the plant on track to produce its 5 millionth Super Duty sometime later this year. The first-generation Super Duty was produced in 1998 as a 1999 model, with the third-generation models on sale now.

Super Duty Line 1 II

 

Comments

Smart move. Most buyers who are 'on the fence' between an F150 and a SD, will move up to the SD for a heavier tow vehicle starting with the 2015's.

Fix
Or
Repair
Daily

Good job Ford! I am a Chevy guy but Ford has been on the right track for several years now.

@nelson, don't know about that as production is increased by 15%. makes your statement look very stupid, stupid.

When are we getting a New Redesigned Super Duty? That is what I wanna know?

Wonder when the powerstroke will reach 1,000 lbs of stroke?

1,000 lbs of torque

Increasing production does not guarantee increased sales. Looking at the photo, it looks like the SD frame is still weak under load.

I wanna hear 2015 numbers

The TROLL said it still looks weak under load. What load?

LMFAO!!!

Still running my 99, built 10/98 in the KY plant. Got over 200k on mine, been a stellar truck. Some day I'll get a new one. :)

WHAT WILL BE USED FOR MOTOR, LOOK IN A FORD DEALERS SHOP AND SEE WHAT IS GOING ON

It will be interesting to see how the heavy duty comparison turns out this year. I'm guessing chevy drops from 1st to 3rd and ram and ford are close. I'm surprised they don't mention in this article that the 2015 superduty which starts production soon gets a bigger turbo, better engine braking, and new injectors. I've heard from a guy that works engineering tuners that the 6.7 is capable of reliably producing way more power than the dmax or cummins and way more than they've ever seen from an engine like this. They test these things until they explode to see what they are capable of, and have gotten some crazy power out of the 6.7. Will be interesting to see what the new power figures are. I'm happy with my old 7.3 though. I'll probably keep it another 12 years.

Glad to see Ford doing so well in Kentucky. Good for Kentucky and good for Ford!

@Brad99,

Got a '99 built in Kentucky myself. Got the cool KTP decal on the windshield with 144k+

What is funny is not the best truck to pull??? Do you no ford fix the problem whit the differential over heat,,And wy the truck shaking every time the front hit a bridge spacer ???

Go check the fast lane video about the ford 450 problem???

@Alex

I believe anything is possible but the numbers people speculate for the 2015 6.7L Power Stroke are:
Mfg.’s hp at rpm: 425 hp at 2,800 rpm (est.)
Mfg.’s torque at rpm: 875 lb-ft at 1,600 rpm (est.)

http://www.dieselpowermag.com/features/ford/1402_2015_ford_f_450_platinum_first_look/

I've had no issues with my Super Duty whatsoever, going over a bridge spacer is no different than my past Silverados or Rams.

I honestly don't think the Superduty is that bad of a truck, the problem is all the issues Ford has had with the Powerstroke. I wouldn't mind owning a 7.3l Powerstroke, but once the 6.0l came along, it kind of ruined things for Ford as well as any inclination to own a Superduty. I still can't get past the fact that the cab has to be removed to perform certain repairs. I mean come on, how really wants to pay the ridiculous amount of money those kind of labor expensive repairs cost. The cost of parts like injectors is expensive enough, and to add the expensive of all the labor in as well just drives the thought away of ever owning one of those trucks.

I, for one, am glad I'm not 'on the fence' between an F-150 and an SD.

Bring Back the Ranger! Smaller! Quicker! More Agile! More Economical!

Is the 15% increase due to demand or the fear that future F150 customers will jump ship?

@Alex
More like 440ftlb of torque.

Hemi monster, do you realize that cab comes off faster than it takes to change plugs on a hemi? How much for 16 plugs and 3 hours labor? Isn't it recommended every 30k by the manufacturer, whoever that is this week? That and mega recalls just drives the thought away of ever owning one of those trucks.

Here is a tidbit of news - Ford will offer a 3.0 V6 diesel in the F150.

"TTAC’s sources tell us that even though the next-generation F-150 hasn’t even launched yet, there are already early-cycle and mid-cycle updates in the cards. According to them, Ford is feeling the sting of losing out to Ram on the first half-ton diesel pickup race. A diesel F-150 was in the works, but became a casualty of the recession in 2008. Now Ford is apparently at work on a 3.0L V6 diesel, codenamed “Lion”, that is set to appear by 2018. In other powertrain developments, we’ve learned that the 2.7L Ecoboost will have somewhere in the ballpark of 290-300 horsepower, though torque numbers remain unknown."

TTAC source.

@Lou - the Lion diesel was the engine Ford developed with Peugeot for Land Rover and Jaguar. It started as a 2.7 v6 in 2004 and is now a 3.0 v6. There has also been a 3.6 and 4.4 v8. The 4.4 was the one rumored to go in the f150 and Expedition a while back. Ford should look at the diesel hybrid version of the 3.0.

Lou_BC Ford has realised they need to add a small diesel to their lineup.

Yeah it will be great, not sure why they are waiting till 2018. Couple that diesel with the 10 speed and it would be sweet

WOW !!! Look at the SIZE of that fan blade! Betcha Dodge doesn't have a fan blade that big !

@Tom#3, the Dodge FANboys egos more than make up for the size of their fan.

I bet if Ram sees any success with their small diesel (which they surely will), Ford will fast-track their light duty diesel before 2018. It doesn't make sense to wait that long. GM will probably be in the game prior to '18 as well.

@greg, What????????????

I was wondering if there is any chance they could change the 2.7 ecoboost to a diesel down the road. I don't know much about engineering diesel engines vs gas, but I read that it is already built much like a diesel engine. I wonder if it was originally started as a diesel project and they decided to go gas instead?

@FYI
It sounds like even ram isn't counting on a whole lot of success with the ecodiesel. According to their CEO it sounds like they might only offer it as an option for a few years due to emissions regulations, and they are only prepared to offer a relatively small percentage of them in the ram. I would be surprised if the rumors of ford working on another small diesel for the f-150 are true. This is the third different small diesel project I've heard about for the f-150.

It's a 'wait and see' game for now, Beebe. I personally think it'll be a success and it's about time. Just my opinions though.

I wonder why the ecoboost isn't offered in the SD... .

Good point Beebe, first it was the 4.5 v6 power stroke (6.0 minus 2 cyl), then the 4.4 v8, now this. The difference is now there is competition in the segment with probable market demand. But good to hold excitement until it happens. Also dimethyl ether (DME) makes Diesel engines sustainable in the long-term.

I actually think it will be a success too, but I was very surprised by what Sergio Marchionne said. He said something like "2018 could be a sunset year for a wider application of diesel engines than we have now." Maybe not an exact quote but he was referring to the ecodiesel and made it seem like it may only be offered for a few years. Would be very surprising if ram stopped offering a diesel at the same time ford released one. I definitely wouldn't buy the ecodiesel, but the payback time on it seems to be pretty short. I don't trust the quality of ram, or else I likely would buy one. 2018 seems like a long time from now to have news about an upcoming engine. Usually predictions that far ahead prove wrong. I just don't want to get my hopes up for 4 years and then be disappointed again.

@Alex, Beebe - when I read the news story on TTAC about the "Lion" diesel, they gave the impression that Ford was already planning on releasing a diesel. They got caught off-guard by Ram beating them to the punch.

I do not think that Ford will replace the 2.7 EB with a diesel. Ford will want to outperform the VM Motori 3.0 so it most likely will be an alternative to the 5.0.

If FCA continues to have issues with their release dates, Ford may not be that far behind with a diesel ;)

It was interesting to read what Sergio had said about the Ecodiesel. If it does not sell well they will not be able to meet the economy of scale to justify the R&D to keep it emissions compliant.

Ford may have an advantage since they are already in the R&D stage and the extra cost of meeting future emissions may be already built into the design.

@Lou_BC
The 3 litre V6 Lion diesel already outperforms the 3 litre VM diesel.

Both engines were orginally developed for prestige Euro style vehicles. Even the Nissan Frontier 3 litre V6 diesel was originally for Renault prestige cars.

It appears the US pickup truck manufacturers are going down the path of the V6 3 litre class diesels. There might even be a larger range of 3 litre class diesels than there are different V8s to choose from.

A 'war' of the diesel's might be upon us. If that is the case we will see some good engines coming up in the light diesel class.

M Series BMW's are achieving 285kw and over 700nm of torque out of 3 litre diesels, while maintaining over 30mpg average FE. There is much potential.

If anyone is interested here a link to a review on a V6 Lion powered Discovery.

It weighs 2 600kg or over 5 700lbs and got 8.2 litre per hundred km average FE. This included off roading through sand dunes. That is 28.6mpg's US. Which is quite good considering the lack of aerodynamics and style of driving a vehicle this large achieved.

In a aluminium F-150 it should do better.

http://www.caradvice.com.au/192485/land-rover-discovery-4-review-2/

Do you no the different about gm and ford,,,,4million,sales,,,

What I don't understand is the 2018 date. They could be starting from scratch right now and still have time to develop an engine for 2018. If this engine has already been developed for quite some time, then what is the hold up? If they wait til 2018 it will be outdated before it's even available. My guess is they're either working on an all-new diesel that isn't even close to ready, or this is just a myth and isn't happening. Ford has been pretty adamant lately that they have no plans for a diesel in the f-150.

@Beebee
In 2018 heavy duty pickups will also be regulated. They will have to meet CAFE targets.

I wonder if the pickup manufacturers are preparing for this right now. If you look at the up and coming V8 Cummins Titan, the new Ford they could be laying the ground work for this.

I wonder if pickups are going 'retro', like the olden days when a heavy duty was actually a heavy duty version of a 1/2 ton.

Anything larger used to have a flatbed or something on the back generally as they were used as trucks and not large SUV tow vehicles.

@Beebee
I'm sorry it's not exactly like CAFE.

...................................................................................................................................................

'To account for this in the regulatory program, two types of standard metrics have been adopted: payload-dependent gram per mile (and gallon per 100-mile) standards for pickups and vans; and gram per ton-mile (and gallon per 1,000 ton-mile) standards for vocational vehicles and combination tractors. These metrics account for the fact that the work to move heavier loads burns more fuel, and emits more CO2 than in moving lighter loads.'

'Heavy-Duty Pickup Trucks and Vans

The agencies are setting corporate average standards for heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans,
similar to the approach taken for light-duty vehicles.'

....................................................................................................................................................

Here's the EPA link, the link itself has other links to read.

http://www.epa.gov/oms/climate/documents/420f11031.pdf


@Beebee
I don't know if the 'metrics' are for laden or unladen vehicles.

If it is for laden vehicles it might be the reason why the manufacturers don't want to play ball with tow figures and bring out the magic tow dust.

If you are after an HD in the next couple of years the links at the bottom are quite interesting. You can see where HDs are heading in a few years.

Here is more information infromation that is very similar. It is for vehicles >8 500lbs GVW. The wording appears to be 'combination' for tractor trailer setups. So one would assume it doesn't include a trailer behind a pickup.

.....................................................................................................................................................

The affected heavy- and medium-duty fleet incorporates all on-road vehicles rated at a GVW≥8,500 lbs, and the engines that power them, except those covered by the GHG emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for MY 2012-2016 light-duty vehicles. CO2 and fuel consumption standards are applicable to three categories of vehicles:
Combination tractors (semi trucks that typically pull trailers) - Adopted engine and vehicle standards begin in MY 2014 and achieve 7 to 20% reduction in CO2 emissions and fuel consumption by MY 2017 over the 2010 baselines. While tractors are a key component of this regulation, trailers are not included in the program.
Heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans - Standards phase-in beginning MY 2014 and achieve up to a 10% reduction in CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for gasoline vehicles and 15% reduction for diesel vehicles by MY 2018.
Vocational vehicles - Engine and vehicle standards start MY 2014 and achieve up to a 10% reduction in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions by MY 2017.
The majority of vehicles covered by the regulation carry payloads of goods or equipment, in addition to passengers. To account for this in the regulatory program, two types of standard metrics have been adopted:
Gram CO2 per ton-mile (and gallon of fuel per 1,000 ton-mile) standards for vocational vehicles and combination tractors; and
Gram CO2 per mile (and gallon of fuel per 100-mile) standards for pickups and vans.
Fuel economy standards are voluntary in MYs 2014-2015 to satisfy EISA lead time requirements.

...................................................................................................................................................

http://transportpolicy.net/index.php?title=US:_Heavy-duty:_Fuel_Consumption_and_GHG

http://theicct.org/sites/default/files/HDV_Workshop_10Nov2011_EPA.pdf

http://www.epa.gov/otaq/climate/documents/hd-ghg-workshop-overview.pdf

http://www.theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/ICCTpolicyupdate14_USHDV_final.pdf

HD's are a generation behind 1/2 ton pickups as a rule (according to the EPA/NHTSA). So, what this generation of 1/2 ton pickups are achieving is expected from the next generation of HD pickup. Here's a cut an paste and a link. Real interesting stuff.

.........................................................................................................................................................

Three of these commonalities are
especially significant: (1) Over 95
percent of the HD pickups and vans sold
in the United States are produced by
Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler—
three companies with large light-duty
vehicle and light-duty truck sales in the
United States, (2) these companies
typically base their HD pickup and van
designs on higher sales volume light-
duty truck platforms and technologies,
often incorporating new light-duty truck
design features into HD pickups and
vans at their next design cycle, and (3)
at this time most complete HD pickups
and vans are certified to vehicle-based
rather than engine-based EPA standards

..........................................................................................................................................................

This is a very large document, it appears to be the actual regulatory document.

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-15/pdf/2011-20740.pdf

@Beebee
There you go. An answer to your question. A little lengthy, but it was an interesting and complex question.

Google is your friend.

@Beebee
Sorry.

The answer is. The government considers 2018 when the 'next generation' of HDs will come out after this new generation of 1/2 ton pickups as of 2014.

I suppose this includes the diesel Ram, aluminium F-150, Colorado/Canyon and possibly the new Titan, etc.



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