2014 Ram Power Wagon: First Drive

1 2014 RAM Power Wagon 11 II

By John Cappa

Pickup truck off-road packages have developed far beyond the once common and simple sticker, skid plate and shock upgrades. Modern-day 4x4s have evolved into far more capable vehicles than ever before. The Ram Power Wagon was reintroduced in 2005 under the Dodge moniker. A pickup with front and rear selectable lockers, supple suspension, an electronic disconnecting sway bar, off-road focused tires and a real Warn 12,000-pound winch hidden behind the bumper had never been offered. It was groundbreaking and unbelievable that a new truck like this could even exist in our litigation-consumed society. But we're glad it did.

Fast-forward to June 2013, when we had our first look at the 2014 Ram 2500/3500 trucks where the Power Wagon model was briefly mentioned, but nowhere to be seen in the lineup. The new 2500 three-quarter-ton truck, the chassis on which the Power Wagon is based, received coil-link rear suspension, a radius arm front suspension and an optional 6.4-liter Hemi V-8 punching out 410 horsepower and 429 pounds-feet of torque, among other things. We were later able to get behind the wheel of these heavy-duty trucks and report on the performance of the new front and rear suspension and 6.4-liter Hemi.

Ram never hid the fact that a 2014 Power Wagon was coming, but an unfortunate marketing incident at a beach confirmed the off-road truck was indeed on its way.

Nearly a year after the first mention of the 2014 Ram Power Wagon, we received more detailed specs and images of the off-road pickup. With all the details laid out on paper, there was only one question left unanswered: Is the 2014 Ram Power Wagon an improvement over the outgoing model? The simple answer is yes. To come to that conclusion, we got behind the wheel for an on- and off-road adventure that took us through 1,000 miles of highways traversing the deserts and mountains of California and Arizona.

The 2014 Power Wagon is only available in a crew cab with the 6-foot 4-inch bed. We spent time in all three available trim levels: Tradesman, SLT and Laramie.

2 2014 RAM Power Wagon 2 II

On the Road

We appreciated the 410 hp and 429 pounds-feet of torque from the 6.4-liter Hemi V-8. It's the only engine available for the Power Wagon. The previous generation Power Wagon featured the 5.7-liter Hemi and 4.56:1 axle gears. This made it a somewhat high-revving truck on long freeway jaunts, which resulted in less than ideal fuel economy numbers that often dipped below the teens. Die-hard truck fans will be quick to call foul on the switch to 4.10:1 gears in the 2014 Power Wagon axles, but torque and horsepower from the new 6.4-liter has made the gearing switcheroo a nonissue from the driver's seat. Ram engineers were also able to take advantage of the increased power and added a multidisplacement system, which allows the truck to automatically run on four cylinders when peak power output is not required. You can hear the MDS kick in when floating the throttle downhill or on mostly flat sections of road. It's little more than a change in engine tone that becomes a burble. The MDS is unnoticeable as far as power transmission is concerned. It quickly and automatically switches back to eight-cylinder mode at the slightest throttle input. Where we would typically get 11-12 mpg with the old 5.7-liter Power Wagon, the 2014 model with the 6.4-liter will muster 13-14 mpg. It's not often that you see improved fuel economy with a larger displacement engine, but 6.4-liter Hemi in the Power Wagon does just that thanks in part to the increased torque, the MDS, front axle disconnect and the 4.10:1 axle gears.

The Power Wagon suspension is significantly different than the Ram 2500. For improved off-road performance the Power Wagon features straight-rate coil springs at all four corners, where the 2500 receives dual-rate coils for more load-carrying capacity. The four-link rear suspension of the Power Wagon rides incredibly smooth for a three-quarter-ton truck, even smoother in some situations than several of the currently available half-ton trucks with the heavy-duty gross vehicle weight packages. The front suspension, however, seems a bit unmatched to the rear. It could be caused by the improved roll stiffness of the radius-arm suspension, but whatever it is the front suspension spring feels just a touch firmer than the rear.

The new and more-aggressive 285/70R17 Goodyear DuraTrac tires increased tire noise in the cab at highway speeds. It's a little noisier than with the same-sized BFG All-Terrain tires on the previous-generation Power Wagon. On the plus side, it's been our experience that the Goodyear DuraTrac tires are better performers in the mud, ice and snow.

We liked the range of trim levels available for the Power Wagon; however, none of the seats really inspired us. It's not to say that they were uncomfortable, quite the contrary. We simply want to see a Power Wagon-specific seat option with more bolstering to keep you in place off-road. They should look and feel sportier, maybe even feature some Power Wagon badging. As it sits, the Power Wagon interior isn't much different than a regular Ram 2500, aside from a few knobs and controls.

3 2014 RAM Power Wagon 4 II

Off-Road

As with all three-quarter-ton trucks, dropping the Power Wagon's tire pressure from the recommended 60/65 pounds per square inch (front/rear) to something in the neighborhood of 35-45 psi all around (depending on terrain) greatly improves the off-road ride and performance. We love the more aggressive Goodyear DuraTrac tires and the new forged aluminum wheels with much smaller and less vulnerable wheel caps. The large plastic wheel caps on the previous-generation Power Wagon would often get crushed off-road or launch themselves when driving over harsh, bumpy roads.

Shifting into four-wheel drive is made easy with the manual shifter. It's a popular feature in the off-road world that seems to be slowly going away. As with any 4x4 shifter, it's easiest to shift in and out of 4-Low if you come to a complete stop and put the transmission into neural. Shifting in and out of 4-High can be done on the fly in the Power Wagon.

Inevitably, someone always wants a Cummins diesel-powered Power Wagon. The most common argument is for the increased torque off-road. There are several reasons why a Cummins Power Wagon is not feasible or even desirable. Ultimately, the new 6.4-liter Hemi V-8 backed with 4.10 axle gears provides more than enough grunt to pull the big truck down the trail comfortably and reliably. The Cummins would simply be overkill in this situation and a hindrance in most other off-road scenarios.

The sway-bar disconnect and locker controls are conveniently located in the same area to the right of the steering wheel for quick access. We noticed that the front and rear lockers engaged and disengaged slightly quicker and easier than we have experienced with Power Wagons of the past. We were told the new Powernet electrical architecture system is likely the reason for the faster response times from the locker sensors and switches. Most obstacles can be conquered with only the rear locker locked and the sway bar disconnected. With both lockers locked you have enough traction on hand to literally drag the truck through a trail that would destroy the body. Speaking of drag, we never needed the 12,000-pound Warn winch, but our buddies with other trucks rested easy knowing it was there when they got stuck.

The "Articulink" radius arm front suspension system features Power Wagon-specific radius arms combined with the disconnecting sway bar. This system provides an impressive amount of flex, especially for a three-quarter-ton truck. The Articulink radius arm replaces the rigid radius arm structure found on the standard Ram 2500. The Articulink system includes a large additional rubber bushing per side and short link sections used for the upper axle mounts. The design offers the best of both worlds: increased roll stiffness for hauling and improved articulation over off-road obstacles. We pulled our test Power Wagon into a twisty trail section to get a firsthand look at the Articulink in action. We were impressed by the movement allowed in the bushing. Combine the flexible front suspension with the supple five-link rear suspension and you have a very off-road-worthy truck. We did notice that much like on the road, the front end seemed slightly more firm than the rear suspension.

Thanks in part to gratuitous ground clearance, the Power Wagon really shines on rocky trails. It takes a pretty significant obstacle to reach the body and bumpers. The truck also shines on graded roads and rough, unimproved trails littered with cobble stones. We found that more speed allowed the truck to smoothly push the loose rocks out of the way rather than bounce over them. In this case slower was not better. You do have to watch your speed in the open desert though; larger bumps and deep whoop sections are not what the Power Wagon does best. Hitting a 2-foot-deep rut in a nearly 7,000-pound truck will feel like hitting a 2-foot-deep rut in a nearly 7,000-pound truck.

Under the Power Wagon you'll find a healthy amount of steel skid plating protecting the vitals. The monstrous nearly 2-inch diameter tie rod seems unbendable. Out back we noticed a change in the way the rear aluminum driveshaft is manufactured. Older models were simply welded. The 2014 model is friction welded. The advantage is that the new driveshaft yoke looks longer, slightly more rock-resistant and a bit less fragile. Ultimately, the overall attention to detail has resulted in what we believe is a better Power Wagon to date. Pricing for the three Power Wagon trim levels starts at $45,690 for the Tradesman, $50,340 for the SLT, and tops out with the Laramie at $56,215. The most expensive Power Wagon we test drove was just less than $60,000.

4 2014 RAM Power Wagon 5 II

Our Power Wagon Wish List

Sure, it's the only available truck featuring an off-road package that includes front and rear lockers, dirt-friendly tires and wheels, a disconnecting sway bar and a real Warn winch. There are still several things we would like to see available on future models of the Power Wagon. As we noted earlier, we'd like to have sportier Power Wagon-specific seating with increased bolster support. Maybe even something cushier like you find in the current top-trim Jeep Cherokee. The lockers and sway-bar disconnect should work in all transfer case speeds. There are some off-road situations where the flexibility to do so could be useful.

We would love to have a built-in on-board air compressor for filling up tires at the end of the trail and for inflating recreational lake and camping items. The pump should produce in the neighborhood of 3 cubic feet per minute and connect to at least a 1-gallon tank. Of course, we would absolutely worship a standard cab short bed and manual transmission option, although we are well aware that the take rate on both would be dismal. Lastly, we think the 33-inch tires look a little small in the large fenders. The Power Wagon would benefit from 35-inch tires in more ways than one. How about it Ram?

Cars.com photos by John Cappa, manufacturer images

 

5 2014 RAM Power Wagon 9 II

 

6 2014 RAM Power Wagon 13 II

 

7 RM014_078TF II

 

8 2014 RAM Power Wagon 10 II

 

9 2014 RAM Power Wagon 14 II

Comments

GUTS

GLORY

CRUSHING THE RAPTOR

OUTSELLING CHEVY AND GMC

RAM

Looks fine by me !

Good overall assessment.

It would appear that the rear needs some more meat in those coils though.

Looks like one well made off road rig!

@Big Daddy Ram
When did Ram outsell the combined GM twins?

Thanks for the insight. This truck is the real deal off roader. My next truck purchase. Thank god you were smart enough to let the air out of the tires before off roading. Can't imagine not airing down then complaining about axle hop. Duh. They do make aftermarket compressors for under the hood. Something i would invest in. Don't know if the 35's would rub under heavy articulation.

Chrysler Makes Adjustments to 2014 Jeep Cherokee’s Nine-Speed Automatic
May 28, 2014 By Lorenzo Tanos

Chrysler Makes Adjustments to 2014 Jeep Cherokee’s Nine-Speed AutomaticEn route to its delayed release, the 2014 Jeep Cherokee had been through quite a lot, primarily because of the rather complex nine-speed automatic transmission that made its debut on the SUV. As it turns out, those transmission problems aren’t over after all. According to Automotive News, Chrysler is due to recalibrate the software that powers the nine-speed automatic transmission on the Cherokee.

The report says that more than 100,000 2014 Jeep Cherokee units manufactured before May 5 will be covered by this software reflash, which will be carried out to work out some issues with the transmission. Fortunately, the reflash should not take more than five minutes, but technicians are being told to take the Cherokee on a 100-minute “adaptation drive learn” to ensure that the recalibration was carried out successfully and that the transmission shifts properly. The recalibration does not cover all 2014 Jeep Cherokee owners, and it is only owners complaining about how their transmission works who are strongly advised to have the tweaks performed on the vehicle’s software.

The reflash is not to be confused with a vehicle recall, and Chrysler said as much, clearing things up on the heels of a massive General Motors ignition switch recall currently affecting millions of GM vehicles. According to Chrysler, the process will be carried out in an effort “to respond to customer feedback and improve satisfaction.” However, it seems that many consumers are complaining about the 2014 Jeep Cherokee’s powertrain, as Chrysler stores are collectively ordering about 12 replacement transmissions per week, according to Automotive News. Even then, Chrysler doesn’t seem perturbed, as CEO Sergio Marchionne recently admitted that he has dealt with “teething issues” with every transmission he has encountered, and that things should get better for consumers in about “six months from now.”

http://tinyurl.com/ntg8dxp

Safety Agency Investigates Ram Pickups

By CHRISTOPHER JENSENMAY 23, 2014

After receiving a report that a child was struck and killed, federal regulators have opened an investigation into whether 2004-6 Dodge Ram heavy-duty pickups equipped with manual transmissions can be started without the driver depressing the clutch pedal, causing the vehicle to move. The investigation covers about 110,000 Ram 2500 and 3500 pickups, according to a report posted on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website.

Under federal safety regulations, motorists should not be able to start manual transmission-equipped vehicles unless the clutch pedal is depressed. But the safety agency says it has received three complaints from owners that the clutch interlock switch failed. A complaint filed last August says a child was able to turn the ignition key and that “the vehicle then moved forward, striking another child and resulted in a fatality.” The complaint also said that “the clutch interlock safety switch had not been tampered with and was in its original condition.”

Eric Mayne, a spokesman for the automaker, wrote in an email that Chrysler was cooperating with the agency.

A spokeswoman for the safety agency couldn’t immediately be reached, so it is not clear whether the agency had confirmed the death. If the agency finds reason for concern, it could upgrade the investigation to a more serious engineering analysis.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/24/automobiles/safety-agency-investigates-ram-pickups-suzuki-recalls-184000-cars.html?_r=0

Dodge Ram Ignition Switch Focus of New U.S. Investigation
By Jeff Plungis May 23, 2014 12:23 PM ET

U.S. regulators are looking into whether there may be a new ignition-switch defect, this one involving older Dodge Ram pickups made by Chrysler Group LLC.

There have been three reports of the pickup trucks starting without the clutch being engaged. In an incident that occurred Aug. 25, a young child got into a cab, started the vehicle and struck another child resulting in a death, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said today.

The reliability of key ignitions has become a focus of regulatory review following General Motors Co.’s recall this year of 2.59 million cars to correct a flaw in which switches could slip out of the “on” position while driving. NHTSA has logged more than 18,000 complaints industrywide about key ignitions, according to a Bloomberg News analysis.

The Dodge investigation involves about 110,000 Ram 2500 and 3500 pickup trucks from model years 2004-2006. NHTSA formally opened the case on May 19, the agency said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-05-23/dodge-ram-ignition-switch-focus-of-new-u-s-investigation.html

GUTLESS

GLORYLESS

BREAKS DOWN ALL THE TIME

RAM POWERWAGON

"The Cummins would simply be overkill in this situation and a hindrance in most other off-road scenarios." I would partially disagree. Yes the big inline six would be a little over-kill for the PW. However, I bet the new v8 Cummins being thrown in the upcoming Nissan would work very well. I bet the engine would do well in the other 3/4 and up Rams. Give them a lower powered option, and another diesel option. Not everyone needs the power the six cylinder has.

Damn I wish Ram would have went with a 5.0L Cummins in this thing. Not that the 6.4L Hemi is that bad. I also wish the payload was more.

@Buy American or say Bye to America!
Agreed! The 5.0-liter Cummins would be a great engine for the Power Wagon. The problem is that the Power Wagon is a low-production pickup. There is no way to cover the cost of offering a third engine in the 2500 platform. Thanks in part to government safety regulations, crash standards, and other issues, there is a lot more to it than simply swapping in a different engine.

Wishing that RAM would produce a 1500 Power Wagon version of the truck. Something that would compete directly with the Ford Raptor and wannabe Toyota TRDPro. Also, it would be something beyond the Outdoorsman trim package, that is more in line with the Chevrolet Z71, GMC All Terrain and Ford FX4 packages. C'mon RAM, bring us a 1/2 Ton Power Wagon!!

That is one beautiful truck! A true work of art. Just not enough "improvements" to get me to trade in my 2005 though. I have no desire for a diesel. A good ol' American V-8, for cost savings and weight savings, works for me! Great review Mr. Cappa!

The truck should have reasonable traction off road, which is a bonus.

For it's size maybe another 1 000lb or so payload would be nice. But, Ram seem to be targeting the SUV market more than GM or Ford judging by it's overall payload figures across it's pickups.

It's a pity it doesn't come out in a diesel. Like mentioned above the 5 litre Cummins would be a great engine for this.

But considering it's payload maybe even a 3 litre VM would work since most of the time it wouldn't be carrying too much.

Drop a 4.6 rear end in it and the 3 litre VM should work it will then be able to tow a reasonable load cheaply.

This vehicle also might be an indication on how poor the design is of the Ram 1500 chassis. A vehicle of this size and capacity needs to be a HD?

Anyone else just not impressed with the 6.4 Hemi? I mean it's a very big engine that lags Hp and torque. In the Dodge challenger the 6.4 offers 470Hp and 470lb-ft of torque. Why not let all them horses out? Show people what hemi was made for

@Dodgeguy65
The Hemi is a nice engine.

But judging by this vehicle, live axle, locking diffs, etc maybe the Hemi isn't the be answer for an engine solution.

You don't require those mega horsepower. Where can you use it?

It has a live axle front end, which translates into poor handling at speed. So you don't need to go fast.

The truck is designed as an off roader and any 3 litre diesel will be more than enough to move this thing off road.

On road a 3 litre diesel will move it along at 75mph day and night up hill through dale. Most of the time this thing will be empty with just a driver.

I think a Hemi is an overkill, not the best engine for the task.

This isn't a Raptor or a high speed desert truck. It built for rough and tumble tracks. Maybe a little to large, but it will go places a Raptor can't.

@Tom Lemon/DenverMike/TRX-4 Tom and all the other detractors,

The more you push the more I will become resolute.

What I find intriguing is that you have labelled me a midsize zealot, when in fact I don't support anything.

I give midsize feedback because you guys don't have what we have.

You seem to talk about midsizers much more than I do, you must very interested in them.

Give it up, between all of you I don't think you are convincing.

It's all well and good to be loyal. But loyalty can only go so far.

When there is a plethora of facts and data supporting an argument it becomes rather boring. Sort of like re-inventing the wheel, if you have heard of that phrase.

Most of the time the impression I'm gaining is that I'm debating the same person, but with different names.

Post what you want, I have proven all of you are just ignorant and fearful of what you deem the unknown.

Our country went more or less what you are going through now. You have nothing to worry about. No matter what happens in your vehicle market there will always be some form of light commercial vehicle.

We all know who Big Daddy Spam is so remember to overlook his stupidity, but then again he's only a child.

big daddy ran ram has never outsold chevy and gmc together

The fact that they said the front end is stiffer than the rear fits with the lower cargo capacity.
Why not test this truck with a load?
Duratrac's make sense on this truck.

Did they test the truck in mud?
I was talking to some Jeep guys and the electronic disconnect mechanism does not like mud.

...........But I wouldn't expect any magazine test dependant upon access to the corporate test fleet to point out any reliability issues other than hubcaps that fall off.

@Lou_BC
Here's a great site I'm linked into. This engine would do well in this PowerWagoon.

Check out this pickup and the power and torque it develops.

30mpg on the highway most likely as well.

http://automotive.einnews.com/article/206788117/ziYMdqNtzdhAgo5y?n=2&code=Sy9LY2yTeCNbDCsG

6.4 HEMI is perfect engine for this Power Wagon. Specially for cold North Canada and Alaska, perfect for offroad. Don't forget it comes with same warranty like 6.7 Cummins.
No hikups to start all year around at - 40 °C . No lack of torque and power.
Survivor Truck for Doomsday or Hunting season.
There is no other truck like Power Wagon. No competition. Non, Nada, Zero.
Name one, If there is some, so we can have a laugh.

"...maybe the Hemi isn't the be answer for an engine solution. You don't require those mega horsepower."

@Big Al

Big Al has the crystal ball out again!

Gasoline V8s are actually very flexible Al.

It's one of the key reasons that the V8 engine achieved such popularity and has been popular for so long.

Big Al from Oz should pass me the bud you're smokeing man! If you think the 3.0L eco diesel which already won't get out of it own way in a smaller truck and jeep would pull this heavy ass turd wagon as good as the 6.4L and get 30 MPG highway in that tall brick. Yes please pass me you're bong before you hurt yourself and so I can see how you get so baked out of you're small unless little mind that you think up such bull.

There is good reason to offer the 6.4l Hemi as opposed to the 5.7l or a diesel. The 5.7l is fine for the 1500's but only tolerable in the HD trucks. It's nice to see some larger displacement V8's coming back to HD trucks thanks to the advances in fuel saving technology.

I don't think a diesel would have been right for the Power Wagon whether it was the 3.0l, or one of the 5.0l or 6.7l Cummins engines. Off-roaders have never been particular fond of diesels. This is because if you go back past the last few years since diesel emissions have been improved considerably, no one wanted to be breathing in diesel exhaust all day long on the trail.

Even now, diesel still make a lot more noise than gas engines. Listening to the rattle of diesel all day will get old really fast. Don't get me wrong, diesel engines have their virtues, I just don't think they are the best idea for off-roading. If you ask me to go tow a big 5th wheel trailer, I will take a diesel any day, but if I'm going off-roading, you won't catch me driving anything but a gasser.

I just ordered one! My first was a 1978 Power wagon. It was a fun log skidded! I also have had 2 cummins trucks. NOT a truck to seriously off road with. I live in the mountains of BC. Not fun when the heavy front end wants to fall off the side of an icy mountain road. Now to get a sled deck that fits in the ram box. The new small diesel would be sweet in a 1/2 ton power wagon wouldn't it Dodge folks?!?

@Braden - I just ordered one!
My first was a 1978 Power wagon.
It was a fun log skidded!
I also have had 2 cummins trucks.
NOT a truck to seriously off road with. I live in the mountains of BC.
There are only two foods that I dislike and both begin with the letter L. Lima Beans and Liver.
I once won a radio talent show by playing, You Are My Sunshine through my nose.
I’m a morning person. I wake up ready to dance.
I kept a pet worm as kid for an entire summer. He lived in a coffee can and I called him Wormie. I cried when he died.
The inseam of my jeans measures 27 inches long.

@The fake Lou
Get a life and a job. Maybe if you do that then you can move out of your mom's house.

Any truck we discuss is out of your price range. You only wish you could ride with the big boys LOL. I guess trolling people here provides more fulfillment for you than trying to get anywhere in life.

@ Hemi Monster

The off road crowd doesn't want diesels? Huh!?! This going with what you told me a few months back that the off road crowd wouldn't want more payload......

You just proved right there that you do not do anything off road or know what the off road crowd wants. Go to any off road or Power Wagon forum and tell them that you know for sure that they don't want more payload or a diesel engine and see how well that goes for you. I really don't think you can speak of all or even any off roaders if you never go off road........ and I mean real off road, not country dirt roads or fire roads.

And for those saying this thing should have a 3.0L diesel really need to get a clue. Just because you are used to not having balls doesn't mean others will stand for it.

@ALL1
Notice I said the following:
"I don't think a diesel would have been right for the Power Wagon"

and then I say:
"Off-roaders have never been particular fond of diesels"

The first statement is my personal opinion, nothing to be take as anything different that my own opinion.

The second statement is true. First off diesel off road vehicles have always been the minority. There are a few guys out there who have done Cummins 4bt swaps in Jeeps or I have also seen the old Military K5 Blazers that have the 6.2 diesel. These type of off-road vehicles are few and far between. There guys with more modern diesel trucks that they take off-roading, but I have yet to see them become common place either.

Like I mentioned, especially with the older diesels, nobody wants to be breathing in diesel exhaust all day on the trail. I read plenty of off-road forums and articles and diesel builds are not all that common.

If it is like you say and people like diesels for off-roading, GM guys are automatically excluded because of their low slung DEF tanks. Also FYI, I do have considerable interest in off-roading. I don't do it currently because I don't have a suitable vehicle to take.

@Hemi Monster

From the people in my own off road club events here in Texas to the events I go to in Moab, Rubicon, and other prominent places I go to more people then not what rather have a diesel on the trail. The reason why most don't have one is because of the expense, fabrication, and time it take to put a 4BT Cummins swap in their Jeeps. Not to mention those engines are hard to find still in good running order. If a diesel was offered in a Jeep Wrangler from the factory, I would bet you $1000 it would be the most bought engine within a few years.

Seriously, go join Pirate4x4.com or Jeepforum.com and post a poll asking if anyone would want a diesel in their off road rig either from the factory or engine swap if they could. I would guarantee you a vast majority would not only say yes, but hell yes.

Having an interest in off roading does not make you an expert in off roading. Experience does.

@ALL1
I just don't see any evidence of people wanting diesels in off-road vehicles bad enough that your statement would hold true:
"I would guarantee you a vast majority would not only say yes, but hell yes."

A 6.7l Cummins weights almost 1200lbs. A 5.7l Hemi weights about half of that and I would assume a 6.4 weighs maybe 1-200lbs more, since I can find an exact number anywhere. Do you really want us to believe that when off-roading someone wouldn't mind having an engine almost twice as heavy as a gasser? Weight does make a difference and that is one of the major drawbacks of diesels is how heavy they are. Even a Cummins 4BT weights in at about 700lbs. That's heavier than a Chevy small block.

There are trade-offs involving having a diesel power plant in an off-road vehicle, it's nowhere near a done deal and I know plenty of people would never even consider doing a diesel swap.

@Hemi Monster

I didn't say anything about putting the 6.7L in this thing. That would be way too heavy. I am talking about having a 5.0L Cummins. The total system weight with after treatment devices for the 5.0L is less than 900 lbs ( http://cumminsengines.com/isv?#specifications ) due to its compact Graphite block and extensive use of aluminum in the heads and internal parts like the pistons. The total system weight for the ISB 6.7L is 1,357lbs. I would guesstimate the 5.7L Hemi being between 500-600lbs based on previous 5.7L generation 2 weights and the 6.4L to be 100-150lbs heavier. That is not much off from the 5.0L Cummins as far as weight goes.

In a Jeep, yes you would want something with less weight but a 200lbs difference is not going to matter much in a 2500 truck. It is not like you are going to be taking it were a Jeep can go anyways. Most of the people that I know or have ran into at the off road events that have Power Wagons mainly use them for towing their off road toys or camper to the events. Very few are used in any real off roading and if they are then it is not anything as technical that the Jeeps do. Just YouTube "Power Wagon off road" and you will see what I mean to where what is used for is technical for a truck it's size, but not for other off road vehicles like Jeeps.

I agree with HEMI MONSTER. People don't want diesels on the trails.

Nice truck..have always been a ford guy, but would take one of these in a heartbeat...also went for a test drive over a dirt track and what not last summer at a state fair in one these and the driver giving us the demo said they had just been told that the power wagon would be offered with the 3.0 diesel, but have not heard anything more about that.

A diesel on this Ram would have an abysmal take rate.

@ Jason

"People don't want diesels on the trails."

So you've asked every person on the trails to come up with this assessment to be able to say that people(as in everyone) don't want diesels? Man, you get around.

My assessment is coming from talking with my off road club members and the vast amount of people that I have met along the trails in various places. What experiences do you two guys have from asking people that would actually buy and use these vehicles? That's what I thought. I am not saying everyone, but a vast majority will. Don't take my word for it. Do the research yourself on any off road forum and ask which they would rather have. At least that way you guy will have something to back up what you say besides blind assumptions based on what you want it to be.

Nice truck. However, I wish they would get rid of the hideous graphics on the bedsides or at least have it optional.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

People who go off-road don't want diesels?????

Well, every piece of heavy machinery I see runs a diesel. Skidders can go more places than any modified pickup.
How about snowcats? or forest fire suppression units? I see quite a few 6x6 or 4x4 power line repair units. All diesel powered.

I see way more lifted diesel pickups roaming the backcountry than I see Power Wagons. I rarely ever see Power Wagons. Even the local dealer says they do not sell well.

It all depends on what one defines as "off-road". I'd rather use a dirt bike, quad, UTV or small vehicle like a Samurai or Jeep. I see tons of HD pickups with campers pulling trailers full of quads/UTV's or Samurai's or Jeeps during hunting season.

The Power Wagon has become more of a toy with this updated version.
Cargo capacity has taken a drop.

Why would one increase the gear ratio from 4.56 to 4.10 if this truck is supposed to be the penultimate off-roader?

The 5.0 Cummins would be perfect for this truck.

As a F-150 owner, got to admit that's a nice truck, I would own one. But only one thing ruins it, those cheap-generic Goodyear Wrangler Tires!

@Lou_BC
Seems you have the 'satellite' problem with your landline ;)

I think numpty the multiposter is trying to give you a hint.

I bet numpty is some dumbass retarded hillbilly.

What do you think of the new possible Amarok? 272hp and 440ftlb? Looks nice, not bad.1914

@Hemi Monster
So what diesels are in the Fiat arsenal? There is more to Fiat than VM diesels. Have a look at he VM marine engine. It has potential for on road use.

The VM 3 litre V6 has a version with 202kw or 272 hp and 600nm of torque or 440ftlb of torque. That is quite good and would move a HD.

http://www.vmmotori.com/a-630-dohc-hp/automotive-en/v6-en/a-630-dohc-hp-en.html

Here's a VM marine engine that could be adapted for vehicles.

http://www.vmmotori.com/mr-706-lx/marini-2/mr-707/mr-706-lx-2.html

The inseam of my jeans measures 27 inches long.

Posted by: LOU BC | May 28, 2014 8:49:33 PM

You must be short, LOU BC!! My inseam is 32, and my waist size is 52! I am a night owl and not a morning person. Pizza and Mexican food give me gas. I snore very loud at night. I own a Power Wagon, and it breaks down all the time. If I can think of anything else, I will post later on.



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