2015 Toyota Tundra TRD Pro: First Drive

Tundra front dirt II

The first time we had the chance to see the new TRD Pro off-road package for the full-size Tundra was during its introduction at the 2014 Chicago Auto Show. Toyota really hyped the new package, available this fall, as providing new levels of desert-running four-wheeling capability for the 2015 4Runner, Tacoma and Tundra.

In fact, it even created a huge off-road course inside Chicago's McCormick Place to give hair-raising rides to showgoers through water crossings, over steep hill climbs, on a giant teeter-totter and across a nasty set of broken logs.

The new TRD Pro off-road option will replace the previous Rock Warrior 4x4 option and offers a more comprehensive (and capable) four-wheel-drive package. Like the Tacoma TRD Pro, the Tundra TRD Pro includes a unique set of interior and exterior design features, vastly upgraded suspension components and a TRD exhaust for a little extra grunt (we're told that each of the vehicles we recently tested — the Tacoma, Tundra and 4Runner — will get a 5— to 10-horsepower bump from the new exhaust). The new Tundra package will be offered only in four-wheel drive but can be had on both double-cab and CrewMax cabs equipped with the 5.7-liter V-8. To date, the package can only be offered with the SR5 trim level. TRD Pro trucks will only be offered in black, white and Inferno (which is sort of a burnt red).

 

Parts and Pieces

With the exception of the new shocks and springs, our favorite details on the TRD Pro have to do with how they promote the package around the outside of the truck. Not only does the Tundra TRD Pro have a unique black center-bar grille spelling out "Toyota" across the front like the old FJ, but it also includes a special stamping in the bed sides (similar to the Tundra stamp in the tailgate) that identifies this as a TRD Pro pickup. All badging on TRD Pro vehicles are blacked out, along with door handles and mirrors. Unique 18-inch aluminum five-spoke wheels and Michelin 32-inch (actually 275/65R18) LTX tires round out the special dress code. The package is finished with extra aluminum in front and midsection skid plating for added protection.

The meat of this package is at the corners of the truck in the form of high-tech, specially designed dual-reservoir Bilstein shocks, as well as a unique set of slightly longer Eibach front springs. The springs in front allow for a more balanced stance, raising the front end about 2 inches. Thankfully, TRD Pro Tundras will have adjustable headlights so when cargo or tongue weight is put on the rear of the truck, drivers will be able to limit any nighttime headlight issues with oncoming traffic. The Bilstein coil-over shocks are speed sensitive and have a massive 60 mm piston shaft diameter (stock sizes are 46 mm). This unique setup in front actually softens the factory ride and offers almost 2 inches of extra wheel travel. The extra reservoir (attached to the bottom rear of the shock) allows for better cooling.

 

Tundra rear wheel II

 

The rear suspension essentially uses the factory Tundra spring setup and bump stops, but the 2.5-inch overall diameter Bilstein shocks offer more than an inch of added wheel travel to the back end as well. Also using a rear-mounted oil reservoir, the rear Bilsteins will be able to dissipate more heat (generated by punishing terrain) than any other shock offered in the segment. TRD engineers said the rear shocks have a unique three-stage compression technology to better control both soft and hard impacts, which should include everything from high-speed quick hits on a rutted dirt roads to big berms that could launch the vehicle into the air.

Another favorite technology in this package is the TRD-tuned dual exhaust that emits a V-8 rumble that we've never heard from a factory-offered Toyota truck before. The tuning is especially fun to listen to when getting deep into the throttle with vast empty stretches of power-line road in front of you. The throaty exhaust note was accomplished by opening up the cats and reducing the back pressure, all the while making sure that it never exceeded the 95-decibel federally mandated noise limit.

 

Behind the Wheel

We recently took a Tundra TRD Pro into the Nevada desert where Toyota gave a group of auto writers a chance to test all three TRD Pro offerings. We took the Tundra on the most punishing of the three trail choices, which allowed us to push the front suspension up to and just beyond its performance limits. Our test road was a typical power-line road (a heavily rutted road used by maintenance crews when they have to make repairs), complete with washboard ruts like trenches, endless holes and hidden basketball-size rocks churned up by the trucks in front of us.

Upon first seeing the Tundra TRD Pro we weren't impressed. We expected this off-road package to be like many of the offerings supposedly capable of conquering nasty terrain but basically amounting to slightly upgraded parts and stickers (that's the way we felt about the Rock Warrior package). We've seen plenty of packages with extra skid plating, upgraded shocks, nice graphics, and bigger wheels and tires. And we've had to be careful with every one of them when pushing them in the backcountry — excluding the Raptor.

However, the first thing we noticed about the Tundra TRD Pro was that we had to completely recalibrate the way we looked at road obstacles and terrain. Where we thought we needed to brace for impact, nothing happened. Where we felt the instinct to slow down to save the front end, this new spring and shock pairing just swallowed the ruts right up. After a while, our speeds picked up to 10, 15 and 20 mph faster than when we started. We were increasingly impressed that the setup was able to absorb so much nastiness and at the same time keep all four tires on the ground. Clearly, a lot of tuning work has been done to the front shock/spring combination, and the speeds at which the rear shocks are able to quiet and slow rear axle motions is impressive.

 

Tundra group 2 II

 

Additionally surprising was how well the front and rear of the truck worked together. Normally, with so much extra weight in the front of a pickup (especially with a V-8 motor), problems with nosing into mounds or launching the front end and scraping the front air dam or bumper is typical for basic off-road packages. But this package wasn't doing any of that, nor was it banging into bump stops. The new springs do a remarkable job of progressively controlling the big inputs, while the shocks seem equally capable of keeping all the smaller tire motions smoothed out.

As those who drive off-road in pickup trucks know, an empty bed can chatter and dance around when the roads get rough or are covered with gravel. Thankfully, with only a small modification to the rear springs (one that will likely affect — although just slightly — overall payload and towing numbers on the TRD Pro-equipped Tundras), the softness of the springs helped prevent the horrible bucking motions a pickup can make on bad roads. We felt little discomfort from the back of the pickup when running at dust-throwing speeds down battered dirt roads. And the faster we drove, the smoother the truck's chassis responded. It almost seemed like it was giving us feedback about how much faster we could safely take the truck over washboard roads.

Although pricing has not been released yet, and we don't expect that to happen until closer to the fall, we wouldn't be surprised if the TRD Pro option carried a $3,500 or $4,000 premium. And as difficult as it might be to believe, it would be worth every dollar.

 

There's Room to Grow

But this isn't the perfect off-road package. We were a little disappointed that there wasn't more integration of the package directly into the four-wheel-drive system with some kind of off-road screen or information readout. Likewise, it seemed a bit odd not to have an extra setting (or two) in the traction control system or four-wheel-drive gears to allow for a more sophisticated or differentiated (high-speed) drive experience. The Tundra is clearly more capable than ever before, so why don't we get more traction or a 4x4 setting to take advantage of the added bandwidth? We'd also want some kind of interface with a unique navigation screen (or two) to let us know what type of cool things this truck could do that regular pickups can't.

 

Tundra skidplate II

 

If the truck has a weakness, it's that this new off-road package doesn't seem completely integrated with hard parts and invisible software; it's almost like Toyota isn't completely sure it wants to commit resources to promoting the true capability this truck offers. Fine, don't call it a "Raptor fighter," but don't back down from what this truck is: an all-terrain-capable full-size pickup.

To more clearly state it: This is, in our estimation, one of the best off-road packages offered by any full-size pickup truckmaker around (the Raptor is in a different class). If Toyota wants to improve its credibility with off-road enthusiasts, it could also let us know something even more impressive might be coming (maybe to challenge the Raptor) that could also include an upgraded intake air system, a matching full-size spare or even a more aggressive tire tread option. Heck, toss in a TRD supercharger while you're at it.

This new TRD Pro seems like a great first step (especially for the Tundra); it's the best-integrated TRD effort we've seen from the Toyota team ever, but there's room for more and we hope Toyota fills it. Although they wouldn't go on record, we hope the TRD guys and next-gen Tundra engineers are working even closer together to get something a level or two higher than what we have here. It certainly seems within their grasp.

To read more about the TRD Pro details, click here.

Cars.com photos by Mark Williams; manufacturer images

 

Tundra front dirt 2 II

Tundra badge II

Tundra bed II

Tundra front wheel II

Tundra wheel II

Tundra group II

Tundra slide II

 

Comments

Despite it's capabilities,that is one fugly looking truck.

@ToxicSludge
It's looks like they tried a little too hard with the design, the end result looks horrible. There's a very "detached" look to it.

I have read Toyota's take on the need for a locking Dif on the Tundra. But seriously where is/are the locking dif(s)? In my opinion this is a huge oversight. Let me as the consumer have a locker option direct from the factory.

@HM:
To me,it looks like they tried to blend the different design languages from the big 3.It is all over the place.They still haven't found 'their look' yet.I personally think they need to start with a clean sheet of paper for both the tundra and the taco.Put in a fe engine/trans combo and get back in the game,jmho.

@ToxicSludge
Exactly, it looks like they tried to mix elements of the big 3 designs together. A lot of what makes me choose a particular truck when I'm shopping is the look, and if it doesn't have it's own unique look, I'm not even going to consider it.

Looks like a Service-department manager's wet dream!

Not even close to the FX4 Ford, let alone the Raptor. Try harder Toyota.

@papa jim
How so?

@TRuss
An electronic locking diff is what most Tundra forum members have been asking for but get a Tundra owners don't want it from Mike Sweers. I agree with Mark Williams I think I would like to see some upgraded electronics like some of the 5.7L Land Cruisers electronics to make its way to this package. http://www.toyota.com/landcruiser/ebrochure/

I would consider the Ford Raptor as a better choice.... as with GM models there is something wrong with the way this unit looks.....

My Ram will accelerate faster in snow with a limited slip than my buddy's Tundra. Both are 4 wd and he has bfg all terrian tires and I have the factory crapyears. He has open diffs. front and rear and traction control kicks back on at 30 mph. His electronic 4wd doesn't work as good as mine.

@LS1POWERED
From journalist reviews I read that aren't about brand bashing they seem to disagree with you http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/trucks/1405_2015_toyota_tundra_4runner_tacoma_trd_pro_first_drive/. It is better than FX4.

Although nobody has it on same level as the Raptor. I hope this thing isn't within 5K of the last Raptor because I don't think I would pay that without the upgraded electronics Mark Williams was mentioning.

http://blogs.cars.com/.a/6a00d83451b3c669e201a3fd0b56ac970b-pi

@AD

Service mgr's dream. You ask: How so?

Look at the third image from the top, featuring the front suspension modifications and additions. Tell me that the added components, complexity and cost don't set the cash registers ringing at Toyota and their tier2 partners.

@papa jim
You think that a full warranty off road edition truck with an upgraded suspensions won't be more complex? That doesn't mean it is going to cause a problem that is more of a fear mongering way of brand bashing. Kind of the reason I don't do the turbo's will fell on the EB thing.

It does seem like everybody does love that exhaust note https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2V9_0do_K0&hd=1.

I will say it will sound better than a Raptor but that is probably the only column to put the X in favor of TRD Pro https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk1bmRtv5FA&hd=1. Any V8 truck can be loud and raspy but be loud with a refined rumble is awesome. The TRD exhaust available from 09-Present was a good job by MBRP and Toyota.

@DeverMike/Paul/Tom Lemon/Greg Baird/TRX4Tom/Dave/Hemi V8/Tom Terrific/sandman 4x4/lautenslager/zveria/Bob/US Truck Driver/Glenn/Jason/Hemi Rampage/smartest truck guy/Maxx/SuperDuty37/Ken/Ron/johnny doe/jim/ALL1/Frank/Idahoe Joe/The Guy/AD/Casey/papa jim/Young Guy/BeeBe/Steve/Chris/The truck guy/Alex/Mr Chow/Yessir/All Americans/Scott/Buy American or say Bye to America/Ram Big Horn 1500 or whoever you want to call yourself.

Quit the crap, really.

It's getting long in the tooth.

You want to debate, but it has to be on your terms.

Learn to debate with good information, then we might be able to have a decent debate.

Opinions are good, but if they are only your view to support the UAW, then how good are they. Look at what you guys have done to Detroit.

Terror tactics (union tactics) don't work on me.

If PUTC wants the UAW or whatever to control this site I suppose it's their decision.

It's not kids like I've been told by PUTC.

They don't seem to care. So this will go on.

@AD

You mention the warranty.

No offense, but do you understand what a warranty is, or how it differs from a guarantee?

Hint: a warranty is a conditional promise--conditional being the key word.

papa jim:

With all due offense.

You are chastising AD for mentioning the factory warranty.

On the GM more gears thread you claimed the warranty was a reason to buy from Chevy. You said the CPO warranty is superb for your Silverado. Now you blasting factory warranties for Toyota.

You are a hypocrite and nothing more than a used carsalesman who talks out of both sides of his mouth to make a sale and criticize the non-GM competition.

As far as the suspension goes, maybe it will go into service, maybe it won't.

But one thing we do know is papa jim is the one who bought a 2009 Siverado and had to bring it in for service at least 4 times for suspension issues. This is an undeniable fact so maybe we should stay away from those Silverados.

Chevy looks like a service manager's wet dream!

The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

I have to agree looks are not it's strong suit. And I use to think the tundra looked pretty decent but that front grill is mindlessly ugly.

It's all basic hardware dealers have been adding to pickups for decades. Dealer cash in on what many buyers were going to do to their new trucks anyways, following trends and whatnot. Plus buyers get to finance it and insure it all, in one neat package.

It's just taken the OEMs this long to catch on. And it remains a "stock" truck, for maximum resale value. Win/win all around.

It's not anything like a Raptor, but it's a step in the right direction. And any truck enthusiast can appreciate that, BAFO...

@DiM
Working for Ford and not some Love Site?

Maybe your employer should test you on vehicle knowledge.

I really thought you were a Mustang fan. You don't even know the engines used in a Mustang.

@DiM
From what I can gather not one of those bloggers you mentioned have ever stated anything anti-full size......we are just more accepting and mature in our view of the world.

We have no need to defend a very specific segment of a specific country's vehicle market.

Your comments just now on drivetrains in a full size are better? Did you know that the Australian Colorado runs the same gearbox as a 6.2 V8. My Mazda BT50 has the same gearbox as a Boss Mustang? I know you do.

The odd thing is I have told you about the drivetrains and presented links.

DiM, I will always prevent marketing on blog sites, always.

DiM go out and buy air time at a TV station to sell the UAW, not a pickup truck site.

Posted by: Big Al from Oz | May 18, 2014 3:38:15 PM


Not mine.

@fredtheman - all trucks have similar traction control maps....... can you say "government intervention"????

I had a SuperCrew with electronic locking diff last winter and hated it. It would disengage around 35mph. That is were the traction control/stability control reactivates. The E-diff does not re-engage until 15 mph.
The same with my F150 with limited slip. I can shut off traction/stability control but it all turns itself back on at 35 mph.
For anyone who actually uses their trucks in tough terrain or bad weather this is a really stupid set up.
GM trucks have similar mapping fro electronic nannies. I have yet to look at Ram's e-nannies but I bet that they are the same as everyone else's.

BTW - it is a no brainer that a truck with locking diffs will out accelerate a truck with open diffs.

This truck would be sweet with Raptor like nanny override and a Cummins 5.0 under the hood.

@Lou_BC
You are correct. The reason they disengage is a locked diff can cause a lot of issue at higher speeds.

They are a pain in the butt. But, remember the vehicle is designed for the lowest common denominator to drive.

@google
So how did those comments end up in this article? If they were posted a while ago?

At numpty, what context (do you know the definition of context) where those comments used?

You really are a numpty.

@AB

just curious: Does your comments name (AB) stand for ass-broken?

Regarding warranty and guarantee I nailed it. Look it up if you want to.

What I find awesome on this suspension package that most articles fail to point out including this one is that it's not just a suspension lift, but that it offers 10.5" front suspension travel with stock arms ( standard width arms) compared to the raptors 11.2" travel front arms with extended width.http://www.automobilemag.com/reviews/driven/1405-2015-toyota-4runner-tacoma-tundra-trd-pro-review/
I think they are very close to the same suspension travel and should be compaired together as such, especially in a high speed scenario regardless of the outcome.

You said the GM (CPO) warranty is superb, but the Toyota warranty is conditional. They both are conditional. Why even bring that up unless you are trying to steer people away from Toyotas and toward GM? You are just another dishonest used car salesman making GM look bad. In actuality the CPO warranty is worse than a factory warranty.

papa jim, you can't get away with your old car salemen tactics anymore. People have gotten wise to you.

GM is getting their a$$ handed to them in the off-road trim levels. Don't lose too much sleep over it.

THE SATELLITES ARW BOUNCING MY POSTS EVERYWHERE


The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

THE SATELLITES ARE BOUNCING MY POSTS EVERYWHERE


The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

THE SATELLITES ARW BOUNCING MY POSTS EVERYWHERE


The blacked out grille, black rims aren't very aesthetically pleasing. Plus that TRD orange or whatever colour is not the best.

As for the locking diffs. Well, what diff is the Tundra using?

The Landcruiser and Tundra are different vehicles with a different suspension, axles and chassis.

The 78 Series Landcruiser is different again and is related more closely to the Prado/FJ Cruiser than the 200 Series.

The 78 Series comes with front and rear locking diffs, but the front has a live axle setup.

I saw a TRD accessorised Tundra at Christmas and it was more appealing to look at. The work TRD has done on this vehicle is good and it will assist off road, but still maybe an after market supplier might give better results.

One thing missing in the test, a very important aspect. We buy pickups to carry a load in the back. How does this vehicle perform off road with a load? Maybe a small load of 1 500lbs of camping gear and family will see a completely different vehicle.

Are those front tow hooks way under the front? Why so far under? Depending on certain pulls, sure gonna do some damage to front lower panel.

Are those front tow hooks I see way underneath the front? Why so far under? Depending on a pull angle, maybe doing some lower panel damage.

@Ridefoxone - the changes to the front end add 2 inches of height and travel. The suspension on this truck taken as a whole should be more aptly be considered a "leveling" kit not a true lift kit.

The only way to get the same suspension finesse as the Raptor would be to go to longer A-arms which makes the truck wider.

Toyota TRD. The only thing missing is "U".

I like the way Toyota built these, it's not to crazy like the ramrunner and craptor, but it's not just a shock and sticker package, it's what the Z-71 type of packages should always have been (suspension-wise, at least).

@AB, @Jason

Are you guys moving in together? You could have your own reality TV show.

@jim

Have you been drinking? You must be an alcoholic or drug addict. I heard its a big problem with car salesmen.

Your posts on warranties contradicts the first one you made on this topic, buddy. I'm betting you will vote for Jeb Bush in the primaries too.

GM is on the outs. Don't lose too much sleep over it.

@BB

I am an alcoholic--you too?

My comments are accurate and I use the same ID every time.

What about you, BB? Something tells me that you don't have the personal integrity it takes to sell cars for a living--you can't even ID yourself consistently.

Get help--I did.

@Mista Chow - I have to agree that everyone's "offroad" package is a joke. Skidplates, stickers and slightly stiffer shocks don't add up to much.
Most guys buy the "offroad" package because they like the grill being colour coded to the body i.e. Fx4, All Terrain.

This site owners needs to get serious about moderating and getting rid of the moronic trolls. What was a decent and informative article has been turned into a circus act thanks to fanboi trolls like papa jim, Iray801 and and the other usual cast of miscreants that troll this site.

"This is, in our estimation, one of the best off-road packages offered by any full-size pickup truckmaker around (the Raptor is in a different class)." - Mark Williams

Must have overlooked the pickup with an off-road package that surpasses every other manufacture's off-road package... The Ram 2500 Power Wagon: rear AND front electronic- locking differentials, electronic-disconnecting front anti-sway bar, integrated 12,000 lb. winch, extra skid plating, solid-front axle, 2" lift, 33" Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac tires, and 4.10:1 axle ratio. All that with a factory warranty!

In that one picture of inside the front wheel steering looks like the tie-rod steering link is being bent around the front shock, and I have seen bigger tie-rods steering links on ATV's.
The lower control arm looks beefy but the ball joint looks like a toy, doesn't seem to match, its tough to see the top control arm but as much as I can see it doesn't look very heavy duty.The rear suspension the "U" bolt cap under the rear axle isn't welded on, looks like that would come loose under extreme off-road hammering.
Nobody mentioned anything about the engine air intake location, a true off-road truck has the intake mounted high so it can go thru deep water.
If you want to go off-road buy an ATV or a dirt bike, they are designed for the punishment, trucks are not!
The more I look at the Tundra the better I like my FX4

Buy American or say Buy to America
You had me with everything you said about the Ram 2500 Power Wagon until you got to the part about the Goodyear Wrangler Tires. Have Goodyear Wrangler tires on my new F-150 and those tires suk!
Can't wait till they wear out so I can get real 10 ply Cooper Tires AT2



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