The 2016 Chevrolet Colorado Duramax Is Here

2016-Chevrolet-Colorado-Duramax 2 II

In its second year on the market, the Chevrolet Colorado (Cars.com's and PickupTrucks.com's 2015 Truck of the Year) will bring the long-awaited "baby Duramax" diesel engine into play; the 2.8-liter inline four-cylinder turbo-diesel will generate 369 pounds-feet of torque (at 2,000 rpm) and have a maximum trailering capacity of 7,700 pounds.

The new engine option — on sale this fall — will be offered in LT and Z71 trims on the crew-cab version only and will be offered in either in two-wheel or four-wheel drive. The max-towing engine option will cost a $3,730 premium over the comparably equipped 3.6-liter V-6 gas engine.

Interestingly, the new engine will include a smart exhaust brake (meaning it is multimode) to help with towing; in fact, the Z82 Trailering Package (includes a receiver hitch and seven-pin plug) will come standard with the engine, as will an integrated trailer-brake controller. Additionally, all Duramax-equipped Colorados will have 3.42:1 axle gears and a G80 locking rear differential. It's worth noting that inside the same six-speed transmission used with the gas engine is a new vibration absorber to help reduce any extra noise or shake the extra torque might produce.

Among some of the more interesting pieces of technology inside the new 16-valve iron-block engine with an aluminum cylinder head is a forged-steel crankshaft, piston-cooling oil jets, ceramic glow plugs, a strengthened aluminum upper oil pan and B20 bio-diesel fuel capability. Although fuel economy ratings and emissions levels have not been determined, Chevy expects the new truck and powertrain combination to lead the midsize pickup truck category in both.

We'll have more to report after we get behind the wheel later next month. To read the full press release, click here

Manufacturer images

 

2016-Chevrolet-Colorado-Duramax 5 II

2016-Chevrolet-Colorado-Duramax 4 II

2016-Chevrolet-Colorado-Duramax 3 II

 

Comments

That is going to depress Ram ecodiesel even further. This is a segment that small diesel makes sense financially unlike the 1/2 ton segment. To bad the midsize market isn't really that big that other players would enter this market but its just to small and doesn't produce the sales numbers to really justify the expenditures and investment into it.

I have a feeling most of the people calling dodge junk have never owned one or the day they have bit lie. I'm not partial to any one brand and have owned just about all of them and I've never had anyajor issue with my dodges. My current truck is a 2014 ram and it has been flawless. My dad had a Durango for ten years and the only thing it needed was ball joints which were taken care of under warranty.

Excellent, I look forward to test driving one of these.

A new vibration absorber in transmission seems like feature waiting to fail down the road.Similar problem like all the low number cylinder diesels have with destroying dual mass flywheel springs. Customers change them with single mass flywheel, then destroying transmission by vibration.
RAM has better solution with smooth 3L V6 designed for Cadillac. Their engine option is at very close price range to this 2.8 L 4 cylinder. You be the judge.

ZR2 PLEASE!!!! My 2003 has 120k on it, I can wait a little longer.

But it has a timing belt what a fail!
This is no threat for ecodiesel

But it has a timing belt what a fail!
This is no threat for ecodiesel

It has "centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber".

When I see springs inside steel plates constantly sliding, I see friction and fail. No, thank you. It looks tempting, but there is no free lunch. V6 is minimum for me.

This is by no means derived from the big 6.6
Why call it duramax also?

This is by no means derived from the big 6.6
Why call it duramax also?

@ mp...same company, duh!

More torque and better fuel economy...win, win!

@mp
You are right. The engine is made in Thailand. GM must make tons of money at this Colorado.

Bottom-dollar rear-driven Colorado Duramax LT should cost $31,715, as long as there aren’t any additional “optional” features that come mandatory on the diesel.
A 4WD LT diesel should cost $34,310.

Leaves me out, I was waiting for this to come out but alas, just for city people, Crew Cab only. I need a 6 foot bed to put all my hunting stuff in plus pull a trailer.

This is going to be a great truck! Can't believe a midsize Chev almost has the same tow rating as a half ton Dodge.... If I was after a small diesel, this would be my truck over the Ecodiesel any day. Still always a ford guy though.

@Trev
181Hp is not going to get you far, but it will work for many. This could be success, if reliable. I am skeptical about "centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber" lifetime.
Kudos to GM to bring small diesel like RAM . Ford is going to be the last one from big three.

Sure, I'll take a manual 4 wheel drive model. Oh wait, Stupid me

24 valve 4 cylinder equals 6 valve per cylinder. Tell me that is a misprint our I can't read.

I'd have to give a 6 valve per cylinder engine a few years exposier to public abuse before id buy. How many cams?

Too bad. A mid size manual diesel sounded like a good idea.

No manual? Dang

Limited to crew cabs in only LT and Z71 trim?? It will flop. They are essentially adding $3000 to the price of pretty loaded trucks and offering nothing in the way of business and fleet sales. Why not offer it across the line up? It should fit the other body styles.

Dave, you can get a crew cab with 6 foot bed....it'll put you deep into half ton pricing though...

GM gets it.
Ford is lagging behind ... F150 is amazing but too expensive. Ford will need a ranger equivalent to stay competitive.

Gm had to put the DEF tank somewhere and elected to lower the spare tire down. Empty, the bottom of the tire is just above the bottom of the rear axle. With load or a bump, it'll hang down below the axle.
This engine is de-tuned a bit from its Jeep application. In the Euro market Wrangler, it pushed 200hp and a fair bit more torque. EPA regs must have ben tough to hit.

I just saw the news story that Ford's financial performance beat analyst's expectations in the 2nd Quarter and was sure that Mr Williams would lead with that story.

Diesel in the twins instead. Wow.

@KeithCT
It will come in the other trims in due time. All manufacturers release the latest and greatest on the higher trims first.

cjm, I do not want a mid-size truck with a 140 inch wheel base, and I have no need for a crew cab, been there-done that, useless for my needs...

7K max tow, wonder why that is, is it because they lost some weight some where to allow it to tow more, or is it another GM twin gimmick? I pick the ladder, they must have removed the bumpers,consoles, spare tires again to get that number in a small car......er....truck

It'll be interesting to see what the fuel economy on this thing is going to be like.

The OLD 4.0 v6 (236 hp/266 ft/lb) / 5 speed Tacoma is rated to tow 6,400 lbs in a double cab short box 4x4 and 6,300 lbs in a 4x4 long box. SAE J2807 certified. With a 4,220 lbs curb weight.

The 7,000 lbs towing seems pretty weak.

Love this quote in the press release "It was also designed specifically for trucks” unlike the 3.6 sourced from the GM car parts catalog

The $3750 dollars or whatever seems to be excessive.

When the Duramax settles in I'd bet you will get a far better deal.

Wait for a while.

Oh, those comments regarding the reliability of the Duramax are quite incorrect.

Use google and find out more about the Duramax and how well it performs. Just Google, Holden Colorado reviews.

It's not the most refined diesel as it's a commercial vehicle engine.

Something you guys don't really have in your pickups, car engines seem to prevail, not truck engines.

Is GM going to install the 8 speed or 10 speed for the '17 model year?

@big al. What kind of fuel mileage are these things getting over there in the 4x4 crew cab configuration? I am sure the price premium is due to the extra emissions garbage. Let's hope they do drop the price and increase their availability.

The ram ecodiesel is now on suicide watch. LOL

@elkhunter, dont worry about what they get outside the US, cuz they will never get that here, sadly

man i really wish they come out with a stripper rolll up window ext cab 4x4 with a tow package. If you could get it for 24-26k id be very happy to buy one. i need big trucks to tow my tri axle goose. but i love scooting around in small pickups getting things done. its so much easier.

Let's see, $4,000 more for a truck that uses diesel (.60/gal more than regular unleaded in central PA). That pretty much means you will never recoup the extra upfront cost unless it gets 30mpg plus (not likely). Once again, it seems GM is going to build a truck it thinks people want, instead of one that they really do want (regular and extended cabs, short and long beds, all trim level availability). Too bad, because I think a midsize diesel has potential.

Diesel in chicagoland is .20-.40c cheaper than reg unleaded a gal.

@Somar
Not true. Ford already brought in a small diesel. The Ford Transit is available with a 3.2L Power Stroke. I haven't done my research on it though. I do hope they put a small Power Stroke in the F150 soon. As for the new Duramax, its cool. I'm just shocked GM is throwing a small diesel in their mid size Colorado/Canyon before the full size Silverado/Sierra.

It's funny how some people complain about truck makers not building a truck that "everyone wants" and that truck is usually a midsize regular or extended cab with good fuel economy. These are the same people that whine about how there are too many luxury pickups/trim and nobody other than city Cowboys buy them. Truth is, the demand for mid size regular/extended cabs represents only a fraction of the truck market and it's obvious that things aren't going to change. Think I'm wrong? The Ford Ranger was second to the Tacoma in truck sales 2 decades ago and now it's gone. The Dakota had some decent sales back then too, now that's gone. The Previous gen Colorado/Canyon went through almost 10 years with no major changes. All the while, these full-size luxury pickups have been steadily increasing in sales every year. There is a reason for this and it has a lot to do with the word "WANT." Consumers want a vehicle that has luxury and utility, which is why I see a lot of mid-to-high trim full size pickups on the road where I live in Kentucky. These same vehicles are also on the road hauling heavy; horse trailers, trailers, farm equipment, etc.

But where are those midsize regular cabs that people say they want so much? Most of the ones I've seen are usually company/fleet owned as accessory vehicles for city jobs or road work and even in that population there are still outnumbered by full size pickups (but obviously just the base trim packages).

Simply put, much more people would rather have full size, more capable pickups than the smaller mid-sized trucks and changes in gas prices hasn't changed this trend one bit, despite the cries of an underwhelming minority. So please, save all that nonsensical talk.

With that being said, I don't think this duramax Colorado is gonna do much damage to the ram Ecodiesel unless it's getting highway mpgs in the mid 30s (which is what some ecodiesel owners are getting after breaking them in).

I just came a little when I read this.... too much information?

@Guts, glory, RAM
Toyoda is on pace to sell 160k tacos
GM is on pace for 120k mid twins
Nissan about 70k
So 350,000+ midsize trucks is not demand????
There are whole car companies that don't even sell 100K a year in the us. Hell not to long ago Dodge couldn't sell 100,000 trucks period.

It's funny how some people complain about truck makers not building a truck that "everyone wants" and that truck is usually a midsize regular or extended cab with good fuel economy. These are the same people that whine about how there are too many luxury pickups/trim and nobody other than city Cowboys buy them. Truth is, the demand for mid size regular/extended cabs represents only a fraction of the truck market and it's obvious that things aren't going to change. Think I'm wrong? The Ford Ranger was second to the Tacoma in truck sales 2 decades ago and now it's gone. The Dakota had some decent sales back then too, now that's gone. The Previous gen Colorado/Canyon went through almost 10 years with no major changes. All the while, these full-size luxury pickups have been steadily increasing in sales every year. There is a reason for this and it has a lot to do with the word "WANT." Consumers want a vehicle that has luxury and utility, which is why I see a lot of mid-to-high trim full size pickups on the road where I live in Kentucky. These same vehicles are also on the road hauling heavy; horse trailers, trailers, farm equipment, etc.

But where are those midsize regular cabs that people say they want so much? Most of the ones I've seen are usually company/fleet owned as accessory vehicles for city jobs or road work and even in that population there are still outnumbered by full size pickups (but obviously just the base trim packages).

Simply put, much more people would rather have full size, more capable pickups than the smaller mid-sized trucks and changes in gas prices hasn't changed this trend one bit, despite the cries of an underwhelming minority. So please, save all that nonsensical talk.
/QUOTE

Simply put you couldn't be more wrong
Many people would love regular cab small pickup,,and I'm one of them,it's the most practical vehicle in city driving..

But where are those midsize regular cabs that people say they want so much? Most of the ones I've seen are usually company/fleet owned as accessory vehicles for city jobs or road work and even in that
/QUOTE

Many are on the racetrack or being turned into hot street rods,
the low weight and rear wheel drive makes it very popular and easy to mod..and it's cheaper to insure then Camaro for example.
At least that's what I'm doing with my old Sonoma ..
Drop,chop swap in v8 etc....
There will always be demand for small trucks if car makers don't think so it's their own loss.

When does the order book open?

Now there is something I can look to trade my 2011 Z-71 in on in a couple of more years! Lets see, I have just 58K on my truck now, and by then? maybe 65K or so, and that means I can still get a fair amount in trade, and with that said, I can get a new Colorado diesel Z-71 with my truck and what 20K, or just about, and with my Airstream weighing in at 6500, and just my wife and I, I bet the little truck will do just fine, and get better mpg than my 5.3! having more tq to boot! We might even be looking to downsize the Airstream anyway.

Here is the Holden Colorado wth the industry average 3.5 ton towing
http://www.holden.com.au/cars/colorado

Holden Colorado payload is 2480lbs, which makes it mid pack in payloads, tub small on Pickup bed, cannot fit standard Australian Pallet. Optional Utilty bed longer
https://practicalmotoring.com.au/car-reviews/2014-holden-colorado-review-2/

@John,
Tow ratings are as rubbery as a child's swimming pool. In the U.S, Sedans have 0 Tow ratings, but they have 5,000lbs and more in Europe and tow lightweight 20ft Trailers. A Mercedes Sprinter has a 7,500lb rating in the U.S., but 4,400lbs here. A U.S.HD 3/4 ton diesel here has a 9,900lb tow rating here, but you can have it updated it too 11,000lbs

People make crap up on here to push their agenda. I just checked gasbuddy for gas and diesel prices in central PA. and mark is full of it! there is between .10 and .30 cent difference, not .60

@ SKEETER

Sure, 350,000+ total annual midsize truck sales represents a solid demand...relatively speaking.

If compared to total annual fullsize truck sales, you get 350,000+ vs 2,000,000. Like I said, there a MUCH higher demand for full size trucks than mid-size trucks. The people advocating for mid-size reg cabs have a tendency of suggesting that EVERYONE, meaning more people prefer mid-size trucks over full-size, when that's simply not the case.

@ Chevrolet builds a better...
Sure, many people would want a smaller mid-sized truck for practicality in city driving. But, what you fail to understand from my post is that there are MUCH MORE people buying full sized trucks vs mid-size pickups and the proof is in the sales numbers. Heck, I'll bet you that there are more full-size pickups roaming big cities vs mid-sized ones. Also, your example about turning mid-size pickups into hotrods is a poor one since it represents an even smaller subset of advocates of the mid-sized truck.



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