VW Diesel Crisis Now Includes Brazil's Amarok Pickup

LE VW Amarok SEMA II

The Brazilian environmental protection agency, Ibana, recently announced that more than 17,000 model-year 2011 and 2012 Volkswagen Amarok pickup trucks with an optional turbo-diesel 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine will be recalled because they include software allowing them to temporarily reduce toxic emissions during testing.

According to Reuters, VW will begin notifying customers during the first quarter of 2016 when a software fix could be made available.

The VW Amarok is not sold in the U.S., but we have been told the automaker is considering the move.

Cars.com image by Larry Edsall

 

Comments

MY GAWD ! How bad do these things pollute, if BRAZIL wants them recalled!!! Next thing you know Bejing will want a recall on them too!

Hold it, hold it. Brazil is recalling these due to excess pollution and particulates, while at the same time burning down the rain forest. Brilliant, absolutely brilliant :facepalm:

Paging Big Al paging Big Al......................

refined Euro-diesel small trucks take over the domestic truck market once the chicken tax is repealed

rotflmfao

Global warming tree hugging wackos found a new target

@Lou_BC
People do not touch the Amarok, because of VW reliability or perceived reliability . Outside of that the Amarok is great Off Road, one of the best I have seen

On street tyres and strictly stock it is pretty good Off Road
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zps2hr7jchy.jpeg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zpsf1xh8pvf.jpeg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zpsxniyta0e.jpeg

So much for VW's clean diesel. Maybe they should put a smokestack on the Amarok and roll some coal. They could market this in the US to the coal rollers, just jack them up some more with monster tires.

@Lou, Just another reason why VW was scared to enter our market with this truck. lol.

@Trucker users like in the, US could not care less .It is the regulating authorities. US Diesels not have too pass those stringent tests. Only smaller Diesels do

@Trucker one reason US Pickup Diesels fail Euro V.

@Robert Ryan--You are right most pickup truck buyers don't care. Many pickup truck owners deliberately sabotage their diesel trucks to belch smoke out (rolling coal) as a protest against Greenies (environmental sympathizers). VW's problem is that they advertised their TDIs as clean diesels to the green crowd and deliberately rigged their engines to pass the emissions test. The point that I was making was satiric in nature. Diesel engines have a bad reputation for most everyday buyers of light trucks and cars especially with the 80's GM diesels that were available in cars and light trucks. VW marketed their TDIs to the Prius crowd which were told that these were clean diesels. Clean diesels now have a reputation that is the same as clean coal. Commercial and heavy duty truck users care more about the durability and long term life of a diesel.

The other problem VW has is that most of their dealers have poor service departments and VWs have a reputation of being more expensive to service and less reliable than most other manufacturers. VW for the most part are for those who want the status of driving a German vehicle but who cannot afford a BMW or Mercedes. VW might be the largest auto manufacturer in the World but in the US it is an insignificant player and at best it will continue to be a minor player without leaving the US. VW will never have the reputation of Toyota, Honda, Hyundai, KIa, Ford, or even GM.

@Trucker,
I know about the GM debacle,that would have put most people off Diesels.
Diesels are becoming very dominant here, I think Ford has just dropped it's Gas engine, like it's Mazda sibling.
VW needs to become more competitive , or it will keep on going backwards. Most just shake their head at the 2 Litre, double turbo diesel. Not very impressed by it's low end towing ability

@ Trucker,
VW Corporation is , not VW itself. Money spinners are Porsche , Audi , Skoda, VW Commercial and now Scania/MAN heavy trucks, the last two really " VW"

@Trucker
Really are not VW

@Robert Ryan - Stop right there. US CARB emissions standards lead the world. No ifandbuts.

Europe is always a step behind the US. And Europe has a lesser standard for diesel pickups than its autos. US CARB is the same for diesel pickups and auto. Same with gasoline. Zero difference here.

Europe didn't force catalytic converters until 1992! That was "Euro I"!!!

It's only since September of this year (Euro 6), that European diesel pickups have had to meet 2010 US CARB emissions.

Anyone that claims they bought a VW diesel because it was "Clean burning" , is pretty much lying-they bought them because they thought they were going to get extra fuel economy. They didn't care about the environment , they cared about their pocketbook and how much they could save, nothing more, nothing less. Any lawsuits based on customers' "belief" they were buying soley based on environmental concerns are pure hogwash.

Damn, Volkswagen really needs to get it together!


Anyone that claims they bought a VW diesel because it was "Clean burning" , is pretty much lying-they bought them because they thought they were going to get extra fuel economy. They didn't care about the environment , they cared about their pocketbook and how much they could save, nothing more, nothing less. Any lawsuits based on customers' "belief" they were buying soley based on environmental concerns are pure hogwash.


Posted by: bat | Oct 24, 2015 11:27:34 AM

I agree. Everyone that I know that bought a VW diesel said they bought it because they get killer FE. I seriously doubt if VWs are recalled to correct emissions many people will get the recalls done. Unless they see the same FE and performance I think most people paying attention will not get the recall done.

@Denvermike
Strange you commenting on Diesels and you got it wrong as usual

Ok ryan, how about some links. I know Europe was concerned with co2 output where US regulated nitrogen oxides. Which was more difficult?

The clean bandits should bring the Amarok to Canada at least, I think there is no chicken tax here.

@George,
After this debacle, probably end up in Canada, was talk of bringing them to Canada. They are sold in Mexico

http://www.vwcomerciales.com.mx/es/models/amarok.html

I don't really think the impact of VW diesel work arounds will affect VW as much as the media hype.

I have been talking to some guys at work who own VWs, from GTi's to Amaroks. They really don't care to much about VW's woes at the moment concerning diesels.

The Amarok if it was able to be imported into the US market without the chicken tax restricting it, would most likely be offered first with the VW V6.

The biggest impact I see VW confronting is not the fines and recalls, but the development of new diesels.

VW will continue on with diesels.

Lou,
Another bit of trowl?

You are a winner, Loulike;)

Tom,
If the US was really concerned about the NOx emissions it would change it's diesel fuel to a fuel that has a higher cetane value and lose about 1/3 of it's sulphur.

The higher cetane diesel will allow for lower compression ratios. This will reduce pressure in the combustion chamber, thus reducing heat.

Heat is what creates NOx.

I do believe we will see compression ignition engines in the future overtake spark ignition. There is a lot of work being done in relation to compression ignition engines.

Lower cr also means less torque at lower rpm. The US already has far more strict emission rules than Europe. Their diesel problem is not going away anytime soon. I mean pollution from particulates, a known carcinogen. Here is a cut and paste comparing US to Eu... U.S. emissions laws require all vehicles and fuels to comply with the same requirements (fuel neutral)
· U.S. emissions laws require significantly cleaner vehicles with longer emissions warranty periods, with advanced on-board diagnostics (OBDII) including 13 diagnostics for emissions; the EU’s diagnostic requirements are far less extensive and do not fully correlate with emissions
· The testing cycles in the U.S. encompass a far greater range of operation (altitude, high temps, etc.) requiring emissions performance from -10 to 95F than does Europe; the U.S. requires emissions durability for 120,000 miles/10 years; EU 62,500 miles/5 years
· The U.S. certifies vehicle emissions on a fleet-wide average basis. The EU does not use such a fleet-wide basis.
· The EU is focusing more on the number of particles emitted and the US on the mass of particles emitted.

@Robert Ryan--I know that VW, Audi, Porsche, and Skoda are all the same in regards to ownership but even if Audi and Porsche sales are combined with VW in the US, the total sales are not significant. Even if VW vehicles were withdrawn from the US market Audi and Porsche would remain. I doubt VW will withdraw from the US market, but I doubt they will ever become that significant in the US. As for diesels I doubt they will gain a major share of the light truck, suv, crossover, and car market. I do think their is a market for diesel half ton and midsize trucks but they will not take over the market. The US is not the same as Europe or Australia. For one thing the US does not give a tax incentive for buying a diesel over gasoline powered vehicle.

As for many of the customers that bought TDI VWs they did care about the environmental impact of these vehicles and VW used this in their marketing. The buyers of diesel powered cars are not only interested in fuel efficiency but in environmental impact whereas the buyers of diesel powered trucks are interested in fuel economy and the torque of a diesel engine. A diesel Colorado will for the most part have a much different buyer than a diesel VW Golf or Bug.

VWs also have a poor record for dealer support and service. If VW has any hopes of gaining market share they will need to put more emphasis on service. VW cars are not that competitive with Toyota, Honda, Ford, Hyundai, Kia, and even GM. VW doesn't have much to offer in the US for the crossover buyer. VW's problems are much deeper than non-compliant diesel engines. Maybe VWs are more successful in Australia but in the US they are a very small player.

Total Rubbish to the above comment and you know it These " US clean diesels" cannot be sold outside the US. They do not meet Euro V. On the other hand the 3.2 in the Transit and the 2.8 in the Colorado are European Diesels, that are being sold in the US
By the way some Amarok Diesel engines do not meet Brazilian regulations, nothing to do with EU orUSregulations

Cotrrection, Tom comment absolute Rubbish.

@Trucker,
Totally agree. VW is NOT going to become a major player in NA.
It is too European. On the other hand it has built a loyal following in other parts of the world

ryan, please learn to spell. US diesels are cleaner as per less particulates. Get out of your small little world and learn how the advanced countries operate. US diesels don't meet co2 requirements, which are bullcrap anyway. Care to back up your babble with facts?

Tom,
If the US was really concerned about the NOx emissions it would change it's diesel fuel to a fuel that has a higher cetane value and lose about 1/3 of it's sulphur.

The higher cetane diesel will allow for lower compression ratios. This will reduce pressure in the combustion chamber, thus reducing heat.

Heat is what creates NOx.

I do believe we will see compression ignition engines in the future overtake spark ignition. There is a lot of work being done in relation to compression ignition engines.


Posted by: Big Al from Oz | Oct 25, 2015 4:17:27 AM

The US already uses diesel that is 15 ppm sulfer. How much lower does it need to go. Our diesels already run very low base compression ratios in the high 16:1 to low 17:1. To help keep heat low in the combustion process EGR is used. Even at idle. Our diesels are so raped of power it is not funny.

@BAFO - They days of "compression ignition" engines, or "diesels" as we like to call them, in light passenger vehicles, are coming to a close. The VW scandal says it all.

Emission control equipment/devices and "clean" diesel fuel, go against the very nature of diesels. They no longer have the edge in simplicity, longevity, or over-all cost effectiveness, vs gasoline engines in light passenger vehicles.

Especially not without subsidized diesel fuel. Look for that to stop too, the more we learn about the disasterous health problems associated with diesels.

Disastrous health problems? I call bs. The epa(kgb) and their libtard government accomplices saw big diesels as a target rich environment. That's how we lost good motors like the n14, c15, and the series 60 and suffer with the isx, maxxfarce, DD series and others that are choked to death with electronics and added expense.

The disastrous health problems come from pre emissions diesels. Fact, not fiction.

It would be different if you could just ban those. Guess what, you can't. And if you did, those existing heath problems remain. Subsidies on diesel fuel exasperated the situation plus high taxes, per engine size. Bad move. Ask Paris France.

LAMO,
US diesel doesn't run low compression compared to it's competitors.

Also, US contains 50% more sulphur.

Sulphur contributes largely to particulates.

The higher the compression, the greater NOx.

LAMO, just 'cause Murica' has diesel fuel, doesn't mean it's the best or good enough. What a lame view perspective you have, like those people who think "because I bought it, it must be the best" types. Also similar to the Frod phans who pollute this site.

Sort of like the French who found out that diesel wasn't the only cause of the particualtes issue in Paris.

They have found out that GDI engines are contributing to particulates smog/pollution.

It's odd that France has a huge proportion of diesel vehicles. I find it amazing that diesel engines in France produce the highest level of emissions.

Sort of like the US stating that gasoline engines produce most pollution in light vehicles.

doh.....................

^^^^^ Nice try big dummy from Oz.

LAMON,
Really?

We talking about Brazilian Regulations and how some VW's had cheat devices?

Regulating out of existence is the same as banning old diesels. If the health problems remain how can you blame those old motors? And who cares about Paris?

Come on Robert Ryan... you basically said in your first 2 posts (before my eyes glazed over) that it was a great off roader besides its reliability issues...

Well the Titanic was a great ship for about half of its first voyage too...

@Clint,
VW has a perceived problem with reliability. So does Ford. If you really have to get to the end get a Toyota. Ford would be higher than 9th IF people could trust it Off Road

There is still a market for a diesel powered light truck but VW has set back diesels for autos. Many of those who bought VW diesel cars not only bought them for the mpgs but because they were told by VW that these were clean engines. VW will probably hang in the US market but they will not be a major player. Reliability issues and poor dealer service are issues that VW has to address along with making a wider selection of crossovers. VW has yet to understand the US market.

A lot of TDI buyers WERE concerned with the environment. They bought a small highly efficient car that delivered high MPG, good performance and the promise of environmental responsibility. And they paid what in the small car world would be considered a premium for it. And they took that happy smug feeling and felt justified and whatever else they were looking for and had bought until it turned out to at least be partially a HUGE lie. The average VW owner cares about such things. Its their core, its their customer, its their thing. For most TDI owners finding out their ethical intelligent choice was not ethical would be no different than a Volvo owner finding out their crash tests had been faked or a Subaru owner finding out his powersteering system if lubricated with puppy tears.



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