Which Pickup Will Hit $100,000 First?

Ram 3500 1C II

By G.R. Whale

You've probably noticed pickup trucks are getting more expensive. In fact, it's easy nowadays to spend as much as $40,000 on a mid-size pickup, more than $60,000 on a half-ton and better than $80,000 on a one-ton dually. Not surprisingly, average pickup transaction prices seem to be growing at a much faster rate than cars.

It's my position that we have primarily ourselves — consumers — to blame. Hear me out: Bad driving habits are causing insurance companies to lobby for more high-tech active and passive safety equipment; we want our trucks to have 900 pounds-feet of torque, 4,000 pounds of payload and 20,000 pounds of towing capacity — mainly to pick up some fence posts and a few bags of cement.

Additionally, it seems like we can't even get the kids to school without ventilated leather seats and a fancy entertainment system. Detroit is laughing all the way to the bank.

Of course, six-digit trucks are not new but previous examples were left to the niche players such as the Hummer H1 SUV, International's CXT and MXT brothers, custom cab-and-chassis models with a pickup bed or tuner versions of factory hot rods — basically, anything you can find at the annual Specialty Equipment Market Association show. But that's not what we're writing about here. We're talking about normal, top-trim level, real-world pickup trucks. Which production pickup do you think will break that $100,000 barrier first?

The smart money is on the dually diesel luxury trucks that long have been the priciest pickups on the U.S. market. Canada already has several production pickups without accessories approaching $95,000 in Canadian dollars ($72,425 U.S.). Or could a big-rig truckmaker such as Volvo or Mack offer a downsized competitor? Maybe it will come from an upstart company such as Mercedes-Benz, which already has a long history of one-off monster supercars. Give us your best guess in the comments section below.

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Comments

Ford

Yep, Ford

Ford's F450

First, you put on a more expensive aluminum body. More expensive to buy, and more expensive to insure and get repaired. Then, you order it with the engine that has two turbochargers, more to pay upfront, and more to pay when it breaks. Finally, when you get it with a 10 speed, you know that's going to cost big money up front, as well as when it gets repaired down the line.

Yep, Ford leads the way in more expensive trucks!

Clarify your question. The next to the last paragraph comments that specialty trucks are already there then the last sentence speculates that a Mercedes one-off might be it. Should we count low but still significant volume modified versions sold by the dealers? A Rousch modified Raptor or Black Ops in various brands come to mind. As for trucks with real volume made on a production line I would bet on the F450.

How about the constant theft that is inflation?
If someone break into you home every year; but they only steal 5% of your money, are you okay with that?
federal reserve is NOT part of the US government.
They work with the well dressed criminal class; the top 0.1%. The make no product, the perform no service of any public utility.

To answer the headline question:
Tesla. They've hinted at a pickup truck version before, to come out somewhere around 2020/21. I think right now we're approaching a slowdown in vehicle sales so prices may slip a bit in the attempt to keep numbers up.

The new super duty F450 will come close... Tesla, maybe (but is that really a truck since its not body on frame?).

I don't think hitting 100K is anything for anyone to be proud of. In many ways kinda the opposite really in my opinion. Welcome to the world of pointless sticker padding fluff on a truck like glass roofs.

But it is inevitable.

Mercedes Benz already has one. The G63 AMG 6x6

www.mercedes-benz.com/en/mercedes-benz/vehicles/passenger-cars/g-class/the-automotive-declaration-of-independence/

Also, counting dealer mods there are Jeep Wrangler conversation kits that push $100k. AEV Brute Double Cab comes to mind.

I will never spend pay this much for something that depreciates.

I saw a Ford Shelby pickup for $99,980. You add TTL that's well over $100,000. The Tonka is not far behind at about $1,000 less. It's called gouging the public!

Not sure (probably Ford F450), but I'll be around to buy it when it comes off it's lease and is only worth 45k.

Just got a lightly used 1 owner King Ranch Crew Cab 4x4 F150 with <75k miles on the clock for cheaper than a new V6 XLT 2x4 with cloth.

It's all the yahoo's who buys a truck for status symbols that drives prices up. Hurts us who buys a truck for a truck.

autodrive f450 with electric tint glass and jacuzzi driver seat

Ford is #1 with everything. LOL

F-450 Crew Cab Dually 4x4 in Diamond Platinum King Ranch Limited trim

Hellcat ram rebel trx= $100,099 msrp

Most likely Ford with their 2 cent trucks.

I won't pay 40k for a truck, don't care about 100k.

Id pay 100,000 grand for a ford, but you couldnt give me a ram or a chebbie!!!

Thank gosh you can still by an off-road capable gas 4-cylinder truck today for only $26,000 with under 10 miles on it like my 2016 Toyota Tacoma!

Ford needs to fix their brake problems on 2016 F-150's!!!

NHTSB is now investigating and possible massive recall is coming...

Tesla

uh oh, you mean hurts you guys who buy a truck for a grocery getter?

It's funny to hear MB referred to as an upstart.
So if we look past low volume stuff that says Hennessey, Shelby, AEV or such on the title and disregard things that are MD trucks with a bed... Ford.

Ford needs to fix their brake problems on 2016 F-150's!!!

NHTSB is now investigating and possible massive recall is coming...
Posted by: oxi | Oct 4, 2016 11:13:48 AM

Please post that on http://www.tfltruck.com TFL needs oxi!

@Mark Williams
You are absolutely right in this article. I was criticizing ford to go aluminium a years ago and saying, it will run prices much more higher than ford predicted $250 and that's exactly what happened. You were all arguing with me. I refuse to pay those kind of money for stupid truck I need.
I will keep overloading my 1year preowned 2010 RAM 1500 4x4 fully loaded Laramie, I bought for C$ 33,000 ~ $25k. People should vote with their valet , but no, they need to replace their truck every 2 years. Trade in "old" one and get a "new" model with touch screen, which doesn't work when needed . People are broke, because they have no brain and because of their stupid actions, they push pricing up for all of us.

Why ford and other companies needs to have 10 billions of profit every year ? Just think of it. It's not like their cars has less problems ,than 10 years ago. It's getting worse. You would assume, that issues like trany, engine, brakes, air bags, stupid door latch spring would be ironed 60 years ago.
No , some people even on this site would buy the same truck for more than $100k , just because it's "their" brand.
I always chuckle, when I read a comments like that.
People are stuck in brand loyalty, because of leasing and trade in issues. It's hard to get them out from this circle , but market is moving slowly. New generation of truck buyers doesn't care about a brand loyalty. Price and value is most important for them . And because of that,
Ford and GM is losing and it's a good sign for everyone. I will be ready in 2 years to buy a cheap fully loaded truck , when this market crashes again.
Until then, I will keep overloading my truck and get the last breath out of it, before I sell it for $8000 to some lucky fella.

My bet for $100k truck is on F450 fully loaded with 27 cameras automatically uploading pictures to the fasbook and drone flying above the truck with thermal camera to tell the driver in 20 languages to slow down , because of important intersection approaching, the huge sign he missed, because of texting and nose picking.

"People are broke, because they have no brain and because of their stupid actions, they push pricing up for all of us."

Not really, if you dont care about "owning" the thing, then a low down payment loan or a 0 down lease is just smart use of capital. Someone can pay 10k spread out over three years and get to drive a new truck that's covered by warranty that they can trade in and convert the equity they had in the truck into a lower payment on the next. Its all about time value of money.

You sink 25k into a depreciating asset on day 1, that maybe sometime down the road you can recoup 5-7k for when it is completely worn out, you have to drive the thing for 10-15 years to recoup your initial outlay of 25k. With a lease or a super low down payment 72+ month loan, you are essentially paying the depreciation of the car with the option to re-up for a new truck every 3-5 years.

Where people go wrong is when they put cash down on a lease or put a huge down payment on a super long term loan and go under water to get the payments low enough to buy a truck they couldn't otherwise afford (you ever drive through a small town where the best job someone can aim for is being general manager at a Walmart and wonder why the per-capita King Ranch/Platinum/LTZ/Denali ownership is higher than in some major cities?) That is stupid, and yeah it happens every day because the dealer just wants to move inventory.

But sinking an enormous amount of cash into a depreciating asset is equally stupid, unless you plan on driving it 10-15-20 years, and you have the discipline to pay yourself back that 300-400/month from not having a car payment straight into savings so that you have enough money down the road to put down on the next truck or pay for repairs once it is out of warranty.

Ford F-450. Priced one out at $87650 on Ford site. Didn't include self parking or front camera or adaptive headlights.

I paid 29 for my 2015 Ram but I bought it at the end of the year and got nearly 12,000 off the window sticker

If you dont care about "owning" the thing, then a low down payment loan or a 0 down lease is just smart use of capital.

Posted by: devilsadvocate | Oct 4, 2016 3:15:55 PM

Your theory has a flaw.
You are not allowed to make more than 10 ~ 15k miles, when you put 0 Down. No scratch, no tire abuse offroad, no farts to the seats.
What's the point to own a truck, if you can't use it as a truck, but just to drive it to the work and back.
You shouldn't get a truck in the first place, if you have to lease it.
That's exactly what's happening. People lease a truck with 0 Down, but don't use it as a truck, because it's expensive to make more than 15k miles and after 2 years they trade it in and lease another grocery gutter for even more money . It's not my money, I don't care, but they are the ones pushing pricing up for all of us.

Would rather have the XL model with the chrome bumper option. Cruse control and ac with cloth seats and 4x4 shift on the floor is all that's needed in a truck.
Funny I would pay extra for a 6 sp manual trans.

Don't exclude International. They were first. They were PRODUCTION trucks.

International was the first with production pickup to top $100,00. International CXT , RXT, and MXT offered trucks that optioned to over $100K. Produced from 2004 to 2008.

Starting MSRP on a f-450 platinum is 77,125.

That's insane. I like these new ford trucks, but geez they are expensive. If I were to buy new I'd probably get an XL or XLT and put some leather seats in it. Still would be much nicer than any truck 10 years ago.

Fully loaded 2017 Raptor is $73,000

@Nitro, I'll be honest. My truck is a grocery getter. It's an LML Duramax. One day I may get to tow with it! lol. Even then it will just be a camper or a boat.

LEGACY POWER WAGON IS WELL OVER THAT.

Your theory has a flaw.
You are not allowed to make more than 10 ~ 15k miles, when you put 0 Down. No scratch, no tire abuse offroad, no farts to the seats.
What's the point to own a truck, if you can't use it as a truck, but just to drive it to the work and back.
You shouldn't get a truck in the first place, if you have to lease it.
That's exactly what's happening. People lease a truck with 0 Down, but don't use it as a truck, because it's expensive to make more than 15k miles and after 2 years they trade it in and lease another grocery gutter for even more money . It's not my money, I don't care, but they are the ones pushing pricing up for all of us.


Posted by: RAM | Oct 4, 2016 6:02:04 PM

Speak for yourself.

I barely drive 7-8k miles a year, and I have somehow managed to own 3 trucks in the last 15 years that I used for light offroading at the ranch, hunting, pulling trailers, hauling rocks/dirt/lumber/tools/deer blinds/etc in the bed all while somehow miraculously not beating them to sh**. Sounds like you have a personal problem with taking care of your stuff.

FWIW, I have financed not leased my past two trucks, not leased (mainly because they were 2-3yr old certified models and you cant lease those. I set myself a limit on price that I could afford to buy outright if I wanted to, and then I only put enough down to secure good interest and favorable terms and to have just enough equity to stay ahead of depreciation, beyond that though there isnt really a point in tying up all of my liquid assets into a car/truck.

My experience from leasing our last car is that beyond mileage limits it is nowhere near as strict as what you said, quit spouting false information.

All that aside, I want to address the most glaring issue with your argument. Even if my usage didn't fit your definition of what a truck should be used for is completely irrelevant. If people like you had their way, we would still be boucing around in regular cabs with vinyl seats and crank windows with gutless engines that were useless about 45-50mph. Thankfully though, there is no rule that dictates what people should be able to drive beyond high level federal emissions and safety regs. What you suggest is some real liberal progressive statist BS, I'm going out on a limb and assuming you wouldn't take so kindly to a third party dictating what you can and cant buy based on their own definition of need vs. want.

"It's not my money, I don't care, but they are the ones pushing pricing up for all of us.


Posted by: RAM | Oct 4, 2016 6:02:04 PM"

Actually, that isn't the case as all. The market is demanding more power, more capability, more features while at the same time the government is demanding increased efficiency and an ever increasing safety. This makes trucks heavier and more complex meaning they cost more to develop and build Manufacturers have to find increasingly clever ways to hit all those competing targets that the marketplace demands while keeping compromises to a bare minimum. They will reach a point where people wont pay any more, but for now, the one place the have flexibility is price.

The suckers who bend over backwards to try and get a payment low enough to get into a truck they cant afford are almost certainly in the minority and have little bearing if any on the increasing price of trucks.

Let's set something straight: I never advocated for one mode of buying a vehicle over the other, I advocated for putting as little of your personal capital into a depreciating asset as possible to secure ideal terms, the easiest way to accomplish this is leasing, but it can also be done through financing. I though that was the most basic principle of common sense (forget finance). As I have mentioned here and other places, my wife's car is a lease because it was new, my truck was financed because it is used and also because I got more attractive terms financing while still not having to sink a large sum of cash into it. In both cases, I saved a ton of cash and put it away into savings to either cover the payments or spend on repairs/ non car related expenses down the road.

When I turn around and sell either of them, I wont be any further ahead or behind the guy who bought the thing outright, but while he had 10s of thousands of dollars tied up in the depreciating asset for all those years, I only had my down payment (which was 0 on my wife's car) and whatever payments I had made up to that point. If you do things right like not taking bad interest/term you stay ahead of depreciation, and when you decide to trade up you have that huge pile of cash that you put into savings instead of spending it all on something that is worth less the moment you put the key in the ignition.

I realize not everyone has a Masters degree or extensive background in finance so you can be forgiven for not fully understanding things like time value of money, opportunity cost, and the simple mathematics that go into a vehicle lease or loan, or the market forces and technological advances that make vehicles more expensive than they were even 5 years ago (none of which have ANYTHING to do with how a person paid for a their car).

However, at a bare minimum I would expect an adult who wakes up every day and manages to remember to keep breathing long enough to log onto a computer and post on the internet would understand at least basic things like reading comprehension, and not cherry picking or taking things out of context when trying to argue with someone, but guess that's too much to ask.

I am not arguing with you.
I just said , that there is a mileage limit and other limits , when leasing and that people, who lease a new truck every 2 years, drive the pricing up for all of us.

Predicting who will come out with a $100,000 truck first is a hard game, because FCA could make a luxurious Maserati pickup truck, but then General Motors can also do the same by making an upscale Cadillac truck. Oh, and then Ford can also come out with an elite, fullsize Lincoln pickup truck.

You know, I think I actually want to see this happen! 👍

One day I used http://edmunds.com to build a Ford F-450 Super Duty Platinum Crew Cab that was the most expensive trim and had every option I could possibly put on. The price?

$90,395.

But that's not all. I did the same thing with a Ram 3500 Limited Mega Cab, and that produced a price of $91,730.

But it only gets better. When I did that same thing with a GMC Sierra 1500 (NOT 3500) Denali Crew Cab, I got $94,485. The strange thing was that the 1500 Denali Crew Cab was the most expensive while the Sierra 2500HD Denali Crew Cab was $82,450 and the Sierra 3500HD Denali Crew Cab was $82,330. I'm thinking of building and pricing those again though to see if I can get more expensive GMC trucks. In the meantime, the most expensive truck I've built online was that GMC Sierra 1500 Denali Crew Cab at $94,485.



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