Ford and Mopar Celebrate Milestones

Ford 2_Truck_Family 2017A II

No matter what the sales climate, it's not easy keeping products at the top of their game year after year, let alone decade after decade, but that's exactly what two major players are celebrating this year.

The first holds the longest-standing sales record for any vehicle: The Ford F-Series has been the best-selling pickup truck in the U.S. since 1977 and the best-selling vehicle in the U.S. since 1982. During those 40 years, Ford has sold more than 26 million full-size pickups — if lined up bumper to bumper, they could circle the globe three times.

The other auto-industry milestone is the 80th anniversary of Mopar, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles' high-performance parts and service group. With deep roots in the U.S. muscle-car era and responsible for some of the most powerful performance packages in the auto industry, Mopar sells aftermarket performance, styling and upgrade parts for Fiat, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep and Ram vehicles. Started in 1937, Mopar now sells more than 500,000 parts in more than 20 countries.

Here are some interesting facts about the F-Series and Mopar.

Ford F-Series Fun Facts

  • 1977: Ford sold about 2,000 fewer F-Series pickups than it did in 2016
  • 1984: Ford F-100 is replaced by the Ford F-150
  • 1993: Ford perfected the limited-run truck with the intro of the Harley-Davidson F-150 and SVT F-150 Lightning
  • 1997: The F-150 gets a curvy, swoopy exterior design and now sits on two distinct platforms. (Did you know that technically there was no 1996 Ford F-150 because Ford started building 1997 models in December 1995?)
  • 2004: The 11th-generation Ford F-150 started to take on a familiar shape with its new redesign
  • 2011: Both EcoBoost and Power Stroke upgrades begin to push their respective platforms to new heights
  • 2015: Ford stuns a skeptical pickup truck segment by making body panels and the bed out of aluminum

Mopar Parts Fun Facts

  • 1937: The first product with the Mopar name was a new anti-freeze for Chrysler vehicles
  • 1953: Mopar moved to the Center Line, Mich., complex where it is today
  • 1960s: Racecar driver "Big Daddy" Don Garlits starts his relationship with Mopar
  • 1968: The Dodge Dart and Plymouth Barracuda Hemi Super Stock cars set many NHRA records
  • 1987: Chrysler purchases Jeep assets from American Motors and Mopar grows its Jeep parts lists
  • 2001: Mopar engineers decide to see if the 8.3-liter Viper motor will fit into a Ram 1500. It does, and the resulting concept shown at the 2002 Detroit Auto Show becomes the Dodge Ram SRT-10. 
  • 2008: Mopar begins marketing its first "packaged cars" with the Mopar Dodge Challenger Drag Pak
  • 2015: Mopar makes its first Ram 1500 Mopar Rebel with a package of selected parts to sharpen its attitude

Manufacturer images/logos

Mopar 80 II

 

Comments

At one time MOPAR may have meant something, but after Mercedes took Chrysler over, it became JUNK, and still is.

Didn't R. Petty use some Mopar parts in the 60's and 70'

Thanks ford for all the fine trucks and cars that you have build they are like bullet proo today.

Chrysler is essentially the first manufacturer to offer a mass produced computer controlled engine and that was about 1975-76ish.
They never received the credit they deserved for such a break through because of perceived problems with their lean burn electronic computer controlled ignition system. Unfortunately, the technology was too far ahead for the auto technicians of the time. Had Chrysler developed good diagnostic training courses and had their dealer techs well prepared in advance, they would have garnered much more respect for that computerized system.

I have spoken with several techs from that time who admit they always suspected the black box on the air cleaner and not knowing how to properly trouble shoot it, simply removed it in favor or the older point system. Too bad.

Chrysler is essentially the first manufacturer to offer a mass produced computer controlled engine and that was about 1975-76ish.

@GMSRGREAT

Sorry, but Daimler, Porsche and VW all had plug-in diagnostics and even electronic fuel injection by the mid 70s (Bosch actually).

They were ten years ahead of Mopar and everybody else with electronics. Cadillac had EFI by then.

The electronics you are referring to was Chrysler's adoption of the solid state distributor, that replaced the points and manual dwell measurement that old cars back then.

Chrysler is essentially the first manufacturer to offer a mass produced computer controlled engine and that was about 1975-76ish.
@GMSRGREAT

Sorry, but Daimler, Porsche and VW all had plug-in diagnostics and even electronic fuel injection by the mid 70s (Bosch actually).
@papajim


That's 1975-76 ish isn't it ?

Chrysler is essentially the first manufacturer to offer a mass produced computer controlled engine and that was about 1975-76ish.
They never received the credit they deserved for such a break through because of perceived problems with their lean burn electronic computer controlled ignition system. Unfortunately, the technology was too far ahead for the auto technicians of the time. Had Chrysler developed good diagnostic training courses and had their dealer techs well prepared in advance, they would have garnered much more respect for that computerized system.

I have spoken with several techs from that time who admit they always suspected the black box on the air cleaner and not knowing how to properly trouble shoot it, simply removed it in favor or the older point system. Too bad.


Posted by: GMSRGREAT | Jan 7, 2017 2:32:17 PM

Try and learn some history

Chrysler was the first domestic manufacturer to offer an alternator and torsion bars. Also Chrysler developed the turbine car which was from their defense contracts during WW II. Chrysler had some great engineers but unfortunately the quality of their products did not measure up to the quality of their engineers. It is sad to see Chrysler go down with the exception of Ram and Jeep which are doing well.

Chevy went to number one in sales after they bought out Studebaker and used their truck design. You can see the Studebaker design in the 68-74 Chevy Trucks. Then their in-house did a redesign and Ford took over in sales.

@papajim: the Chrysler electronic ignition you speak of happened in about 1972, my 1972 Duster 340 had it.

The lean burn was something else, from 1976. A good idea, but yet ahead of it's time, and mechanics didn't know proper troubleshooting procedures.

Who cares about overpriced German Porshes and Daimlers?

Please, VW in the 70s were trying to figure out what's next after air cooled didn't get it no more.

Tell me about Cadilac, they couldn't make MDS work, but Dodge could, and Chevy learned from it.

Chrysler always had a best engineers and always will. Ford couldn't make that aluminium cabin without them. Abomb was Chrysler as well.

Chrysler always had a best engineers and always will. Ford couldn't make that aluminium cabin without them. Abomb was Chrysler as well.

Posted by: RAM | Jan 7, 2017 7:30:58 PM

Then you would think they would not be on the very bottom for reliability ratings. For a very long time too.

The electronics you are referring to was Chrysler's adoption of the solid state distributor, that replaced the points and manual dwell measurement that old cars back then.

Posted by: papajim | Jan 7, 2017 2:47:28 PM

First, earlier I was referring to domestic manufactures and their wide spread use of electronics in their vehicles.

Now back to the lean burn:

This was much more than a replacement for points which was the dura spark and HEI systems. The lean burn was a computer that more accurately controlled ignition timing emissions based on varied inputs such as engine temp, air temp, throttle position etc. A precursor if you will for what we enjoy today as computerized fuel injection.
With respect to the Porsches and vw' you mentioned, I would read up on mechanical, electronic and computerized fuel injection systems, there are vast differences in the use of technology for each.

Yeah papajim do like GMdude and read Wikipedia.

The RAM guys really have a hard time with facts.

papajim - it would be cool to meet face to face. Too bad I'm 2,400 miles away. Cheers.

Then you would think they would not be on the very bottom for reliability ratings. For a very long time too.
Posted by: Sexy dude in a Chevy truck | Jan 7, 2017 7:48:42 PM

Abomb, Pentagon building, HEMI, 545 RFE, multilink 8 speed..... Nothing is more reliable.

If anyone wants to meet at the Detroit AutoShow, I'm down. We can meet up at a bar near Cobo. Just determine the time/place and I'll be there.

Hay Frank/Chris/Nitro, Meet me somewhere and I'll smoke you!
Posted by: papajim | Jan 7, 2017 3:29:02 PM

----------------------------------------------------------------

the above is not my post. Not leaving sunny Florida for Michigan in the dead of winter.


Abomb, Pentagon building, HEMI, 545 RFE, multilink 8 speed..... Nothing is more reliable.

Posted by: RAM | Jan 8, 2017 1:57:03 AM

Yea, within the fiat product line. Not compared to every other vehicle brand in the world. Funny how most of what you listed is old.

"1987: Chrysler purchases Jeep assets from American Motors and Mopar grows its Jeep parts lists"

No. Chrysler purchased American Motors itself. In addition to Jeep, they got the Renault-designed Premier sedan (which was quickly badge-engineered to sell as the Dodge Monaco), and the Brampton ON assembly plant - almost brand new at that time - which is currently home to the Charger, Challenger, and 300. That also gave them all rights to AMC's intellectual property, thus the use of "Eagle" as the transition name, and the long-rumored Dodge Hornet subcompact (from the old AMC compact of the same name).

Funny how most of what you listed is old.
Posted by: Sexy dude in a Chevy truck | Jan 8, 2017 9:10:12 AM

Yes, old and still reliable. That's what I expect from any manufacturer and
that's why I drive a RAM with HEMI, 545 RFE and multilink.

Who said I read them.

Posted by: Sexy dude in a Chevy truck | Jan 8, 2017 1:31:42 PM

Well, you should. The positive is your driving a Chevy so your on your way.

40 years, and soon to be 50, great Job Ford.

40 years, and soon to be 50, great Job Ford.

Posted by: Nitro | Jan 9, 2017 3:09:33 PM

Huh,.....Can you tell us how many more years it will take before reaching 50? And secondly, how many decades that will be.?

I read the article title and thought that it was going to be a news release stating that FoMoCo finally caved in to Marchionne and would begin merger negotiations LOL



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