Nissan NV Cargo X Preview

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By Mike Hanley

The humble, workaday cargo van isn't traditionally the basis for a customized auto show vehicle, but that didn't stop Nissan from turning the NV2500 HD full-size cargo van into the four-wheel drive NV Cargo X concept, which will bow at the 2017 Chicago Auto Show. The automaker got help from builder and TV host Ian Johnson. Featuring a lifted suspension with 37-inch off-road tires, front and rear solid axles, an HD transfer case, and a Cummins turbo-diesel engine, the NV Cargo X reimagines the cargo van not as a deliverer of Amazon packages but as the means for rock-crawling adventure, ready to take you deep into the backcountry.

Created as part of an episode of Johnson's "Xtreme Off-Road" TV show, the NV Cargo X incorporates aftermarket parts and components from other Nissan vehicles. The upgraded suspension features heavy-duty solid Dynatrac front and rear axles fitted with 37-inch General Grabber X3 off-road tires on beadlock wheels. Meanwhile, the NV2500 HD's available 5.6-liter V-8 gas engine was swapped for a Cummins turbo-diesel 5.0-liter V-8 from the Nissan Titan XD pickup truck. The diesel engine is rated at 310 horsepower and 555 pounds-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission splits the engine torque via the transfer case to the front and rear live axles.

Exterior modifications include LED lighting, a front winch rated to 10,000 pounds, a custom tubular bumper and a custom skid plate. Inside, the cargo area has been fitted with equipment traditionally found in off-road support vehicles, such as a full-size spare tire, high-lift jack, portable welder and a tool bag.

Chicago Auto Show visitors will be able to see the NV Cargo X during the show's run (Feb. 11-20), and Johnson will be signing autographs at the show from noon to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. Feb. 11. To see how the NV Cargo X performed on the Pyeatt Draw trail in Arizona's Tonto National Forest visit NVCargoX.com.

Manufacturer images

 

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Comments

Big demand for cargo van offroad vehicles. Pfft..

Just think of all the goose decoy and blinds, or tree stands and game cart plus all your gear you could put in one of these with out hauling a trailer around... pretty cool

Just think of all the goose decoy and blinds, or tree stands and game cart plus all your gear you could put in one of these with out hauling a trailer around... pretty cool

That would be the perfect van to hail a small narrow travel trailer behind and go boondocking.

@Ken

Ditto. will probably sell at least a dozen of 'em.

Nice Van, would be good for an OEM to get in on 4x4 vans as Quigly has a big business doing the conversions now. The NV and GM vans are the best being body on frame

The more you dislike this truck the more I like it.

This looks better and will out due the weak as hell Ford Pooptor and its a van HAHAHAHA!

Will outsell Chevy Colorado. LOL

This looks better and will out due the weak as hell Ford Pooptor and its a van HAHAHAHA!
Posted by: johnny doe | Feb 5, 2017 12:53:59 PM

Ford Pooptor. Good one HAHAHAHA!

Some people never grow up, this site needs to just stop comments. What a joke.

Give Nissan kudos for building what Americans refuse too. Ford owned the full size van market. They abandoned it for the euro vans. Same with Chrysler. This Nissan van is more truck like than it's American predecessor. No dog house. Lots of power. Vans were such a cool part of American history 70's were full of custom vans. Paint, interior, real nice vehicles. Gas shortage of the 70's killed the van and almost killed Chrysler who didn't make small powerless eco models. Suppose campers could find a market for this vehicle.

Yes, 70's was the era of vans in the US. Hauling dirt bikes, type C motorhomes, utility, businesses, etc. And custom paint, wheels, and tires was common.

And in Southern California they weren't complete unless they had a window sticker declaring the preferred toy: Yamaha, Honda, etc.

A IVECO Daily 4 x4 version of the Van has a 5,000lb payload and has exceptional Off Road abilities. Used a lot for Expedition Vehicles
http://www.goingbush.com/iveco.html

Where did everybody go?

Awesome idea,,wrong brand..P!

Let me know when GM builds 4x4 van like that

A straight axle front end? That is so out of date!

The U.S. military buys and uses independent suspended trucks today like the new Oshkosh JLTV, MTVR, LVSR, PLS-A1, etc...

Straight axles are for guys that want to plow some extra snow underneath their rigs!

Straight axles are for guys that want to plow some extra snow underneath their rigs!


Posted by: oxi | Feb 5, 2017 9:45:16 PM

Maybe if you spend enough time off roading youll understand why they want a solid axle front end.

Power Wagon has been and always will be the first in off road.

70 years young and still the King.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grUsR5JvWpo

@oxi, Ram Rebel has an independent front suspension. It soaks up bumps smoother than a solid axle. Every time the suspension cycles the center diff comes closer to the ground. Reducing your clearance. If you continue to beat an independent you can slip the yoke right from the joint. Solid Axles are stronger. Less break points. You add big tires on the end of an axle and you want a solid front axle.

Independent for a jeep,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUEGP4HGPCw

@RR- I that's the old Daily. 2. The SCAM based 4x4 Daily costs a bloody fortune. 3. Iveco has no presence in the US. 4. The Daily 4x4 doesn't come as a VAN body. 5. For a boutique cab&chassis, we have these :
http://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=2aciF9bK&id=DC50665B8170E131BDBF790622A1B6624A491B9F&q=aev+prospector+regular+cab&simid=607999986990254882&selectedIndex=1&adlt=strict&ajaxhist=0

Wow, that is cool. I'd bet it will sell more than the Corvette.

Both solid and ind have their places in off road uses. With that said yes the straight axle will have more strength, but the ind will have better ride and handling, weight is a toss up. If any percentage of driving is to be done on the road, yes ind is better, but if mixed, both are fine. The only place the straight front axle is better, is of road, as slower speed, and if carrying capacity is required. This van does have some potential, but I am more partial to the Chevy GMC full size vans, especially for a 4x4 conversion! for a couple of reason, one is the length of time in production, it has been so long GM must have all the bugs worked out by now?! Second there is the option of a 6.6 Duramax Diesel, that has more power potential and a better dealer base behind it. Lastly there is more room, but you will need to spend the extra on a custom high top, that you wont have to on the Nissan that is available with a high top. But if Nissan were to come out with a factory 4x4/AWD option? that would be great, as the van has no real shortcomings other than the looks, but with a mild lift and aftermarket help that is no longer an issue! Like if Nissan could actually produce this van, obviously not as high, but with the straight front axle, Cummins V8, and a good high low range transfer case, with their very good warranty? that could be a great base for adventure Van/Campers!!

@oxi, Ram Rebel has an independent front suspension. It soaks up bumps smoother than a solid axle. Every time the suspension cycles the center diff comes closer to the ground. Reducing your clearance. If you continue to beat an independent you can slip the yoke right from the joint. Solid Axles are stronger. Less break points. You add big tires on the end of an axle and you want a solid front axle.

Posted by: HEMI V8 | Feb 5, 2017 11:27:06 PM

So explain to us all why the U.S. federal military is buying trucks with independent suspensions? The military off-road's more than we do and they prefer independent suspensions that can carry more, have higher ground clearance and move faster off-road with or without weight!

Explain to us all why the military chooses NOT to but straight axle trucks anymore?

Both solid and ind have their places in off road uses. With that said yes the straight axle will have more strength, but the ind will have better ride and handling, weight is a toss up.


Posted by: Sandman4x4 | Feb 6, 2017 4:15:20 PM

If solid axles are so much stronger, than why is the military using and buying mostly independent suspensions?

Your theory is old and outdated!

@oxi, Ram Rebel has an independent front suspension. It soaks up bumps smoother than a solid axle. Every time the suspension cycles the center diff comes closer to the ground. Reducing your clearance. If you continue to beat an independent you can slip the yoke right from the joint. Solid Axles are stronger. Less break points. You add big tires on the end of an axle and you want a solid front axle.

Posted by: HEMI V8 | Feb 5, 2017 11:27:06 PM

Please explain why the military is no longer buying solid axle trucks...

IIRC Quigley made an NV 4X4 conversion using IFS.

@oxi

Current military procurement is for vehicles that make sense in loose, open dessert.

Meaning, convoys creating ruts, which purpose built independent suspension fare better in, as the diffs hang much higher. The military also prefer independents for their higher potential operating speeds.

Also, Independent suspensions can have decent articulation if you just make them wide enough. See Raptor, Humvee et al. Again, no problem in open dessert.

If the military bought woods trucks for tight Appalachian goat tracks where track width and operating speeds were limited, they'd quickly be back to Jeep layouts, as solid axles can articulate well even on a narrow track vehicle, and don't suffer much at lower speeds.

And then there is the difference that the military travels around with parts, equipment and staff to fix things on the spot. And have unlimited budgets. For the solo offroader more concerned about getting there than getting there before the enemy; simpler, more inherently rugged solid axles, which have been around since horse drawn carts, tend to make more sense.

Love the NV. It's a great van, although I don't see the point in building it up like this, aside from just showing off that it can be done.

The standard Quigley conversion, makes much more sense for a vehicle intended to be used as a van, but which still requires 4wd. For something this offroad specific a flatbed, along with stakes and a tarp for when cover is needed, is much more versatile.

Posted by: Stuki Moi | Feb 7, 2017 2:29:29 PM

The United States Marine Corps, the toughest military branch when it comes to tactical truck requirements buys MTVR's LVSR's, M-ATV's and will get the new JLTV, all of which are FULLY INDEPENDENT suspensions!

You are making sore loser excuses!

King of the Hammers race is on this weekend, just look at how many of those vehicles now run IFS or fully independent suspensions compared to just a few years ago!

Independent suspensions have evolved and are brute tough and reliable as heck!

@ Stuki Moi,

Looks like another IFS won the tough King of Hammers race AGAIN!

Congrats to Shannon!



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