2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Vs. 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro

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We previously compared these two off-road pickup trucks — the 2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 and 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro — based purely on their factory numbers. While that's one way of comparing them, the best way is to drive them. And what better way than in an off-road head-to-head test?

2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Photo Gallery | 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro Photo Gallery

We put these two through the ringer, spending a few days in the mountains and deserts of Southern California in a variety of off-road environments that included rock crawling, hill climbs and high-speed dirt runs through dry riverbeds and more.

We scored each truck in nine distinct categories, each worth a maximum of 10 points. We did not weight these categories, and four of the nine were off-road focused.

If you're interested in how the new ZR2 fared as a daily driver and how fuel efficient it is, keep an eye out for a follow-up story.

But for now, let's jump right in to the head-to-head.

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Powertrain

Winner: Tacoma TRD Pro (by a nose)

Both trucks offered a different approach. The TRD Pro has only one engine option: a 278-horsepower, 3.5-liter V-6 putting out 265 pounds-feet of torque and mated to six-speed automatic transmission. The Colorado ZR2 came to us equipped with its optional engine, a turbo-diesel 2.8-liter four-cylinder Duramax that makes 186 hp and 369 pounds-feet of torque mated to a six-speed automatic transmission.

The low-end torque in the ZR2 was much appreciated — especially when going slow off-roading — but it runs out of breath higher in the rpm range when going faster. Williams mused that the eight-speed automatic from the gas version of the ZR2 might have helped matters here.

I'm not a fan of the Tacoma's V-6; it runs on the Atkinson cycle, which makes it feel pokey at times and the lack of torque at lower rpm makes it difficult to finesse the throttle when trying to crawl. It also seems to run out of breath on the highway while passing unless you really push the revs. It makes sense for Toyota to use the V-6 across several vehicles to keep overall costs down, but this engine might be better suited for Highlander duty than a sporty truck like this. Williams was more magnanimous in his assessment, saying "I found the Toyota to have plenty of power in the high- and low-rpm range, but you have to work for it — it doesn't just give it to you."

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Acceleration

Winner: Tacoma TRD Pro (by a nose)

When it came to acceleration, both of these trucks struggled. The low-end torque of the ZR2 definitely provided an advantage off the line; it got into the power faster and delivered it more evenly. Williams, however, found problems at the top end, saying "The torquey little Duramax is impressive in many ways, but it's almost an odd-couple type of marriage here with the less-than-quick throttle response and hard-breathing upper rpm feel."

This was contrasted by the TRD Pro, which really let us fly once we got it into the higher rev-band range — but getting there was the issue. Williams liked the presence of the electronically controlled transmission button in the TRD Pro; it allows you to shift quickly through the gears manually by tapping up and down. It's a better setup than the thumb toggle found in the ZR2.

I was less impressed with both systems; neck-snapping acceleration wasn't the goal of either of these trucks and it shows.

 

Braking

Winner: Colorado ZR22

We both had big issues with the TRD Pro's brakes, which were twitchy to the point of being difficult to use. During our step test to check the articulation of both trucks, it was challenging to get the TRD Pro to crawl up the steps. The engine wouldn't step it up slowly and just grazing the brake would bring things to an immediate shuddering halt. Williams also noted that the brakes felt even worse in low range, having to overcome the added gear reduction. What's more, even in TRD Pro trim, the Tacoma still uses rear drum brakes.

In some ways, the ZR2 won this category by simply not being as bad as the TRD Pro. But it went beyond that — the ZR2 provided predictable, progressive pedal feel and linear stopping power in a variety of situations, which made it easier to stop more smoothly and confidently.

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Suspension

Winner: Colorado ZR2

This category demonstrated another area of differentiation between these two trucks. The ZR2 comes equipped with Chevrolet's new Multimatic Dynamic Suspensions Spool Valve shock absorbers, which are not just a mouthful but amazing as well. Beyond offering plenty of travel, the shocks were incredibly adept at swallowing up imperfections at just about any speed. Williams had high praise for the suspension, saying it's "difficult to overstate how good these shocks are at giving solid on- and off-road dynamics, as well as accommodating the harsh duty cycles at a good off-highway 4x4 park."

The ZR2's new technology put the TRD Pro in a tough spot here. The 2017 TRD Pro does swap out the previous year's Bilstein setup for a new Fox shock absorber with remote reservoirs in the rear. This new equipment is a big improvement over the old system, but when compared to the ZR2's Multimatic technology, it just couldn't keep up.

 

Off-Road Technology

Winner: Tie

These two trucks had different philosophies: almost a classic new school versus old school. The TRD Pro comes with a high-tech computer-controlled crawl control system, and even though this isn't the first time we've used this system it continues to amaze. Williams embraced the new, computer-based future pretty quickly. He said it felt like Toyota is "conceding that since computers can control, adjust and perceive things — like wheel slip — infinitely better than a human being, they've turned the whole process over to their crawl control to do it all."

The ZR2 goes for a more analog approach to off-roading, but to its credit it does give the driver many more options than the TRD Pro. For example, there are front and rear lockers (the TRD Pro only offers rear) and a clever Off-Road mode that allows more wheel slip. Finally, much of the technology can be used in two-wheel, all-wheel and 4x4 settings. On the face of it, each of these technologies weren't super high-tech wizardry like in the TRD Pro, but we liked that the ZR2 put its tech where a driver might need it. This category was a tie.

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Rock Crawling

Winner: Colorado ZR2

The slow-go portion of our testing gave each of these trucks a chance to shine, and each did, but for different reasons. The TRD Pro showed off its off-road technology with a few quick button settings; all we had to do was set the crawl control to the proper setting — which does take some time to get used to — and steer. The system figures out the throttle and traction control at each wheel and all the driver does is avoid the big rock. Beyond the occasional buzzing and chirping of the traction control system, crawl control works like a point-and-shoot camera.

For different reasons, the ZR2 also performed extremely well. The low-end torque from that diesel was appreciated when trying to apply even power to climb over rocks and ruts, which was a big contrast compared to the TRD Pro. Crawl control is a wonder in that regard, but trying to get consistent output from that engine at low and mid-rpm was a challenge.

The ZR2's suspension also was a standout feature. Cabin isolation while climbing over the rocks was impressive; we could barely feel the suspension working to smooth out the bumps and flex over obstacles, and there was relatively little head toss. Inside, the truck was neutral. Williams also appreciated the "aggressive mud-terrain tread and best-in-class ground clearance," which gave the ZR2 "crazy clawing power."

 

Dirt/Sand Running

Winner: Tie

Although the ZR2's diesel engine wasn't particularly well-suited for this, its great suspension compensated for it. Running over the same roads as the TRD Pro, we noted speeds of 5 to 10 mph faster thanks to the magical nature of those shock absorbers. Points that the ZR2 lost in this category were because of the engine; the rest of it was almost flawless.

The TRD Pro struggled a bit here because its off-road technology is geared toward slow, low-range off-roading. The Multi-Terrain Select System can't be activated unless the truck is in low range, an oversight that Williams called unacceptable. This could be easily solved with just a few software changes; here's hoping we'll see that in future TRD Pros. Williams did prefer the engine/transmission setup in the Tacoma because of how much easier it was to quickly choose a gear — and see it on the dash — with the knob shifter.

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Interior

Winner: Tacoma TRD Pro (by a nose)

Yes, this is an off-road-focused head-to-head, but you must be inside the trucks to drive them, so it's important for the cab to be comfortable and of good quality.

Williams preferred the layout and the materials found in the TRD Pro, saying "the overall quality, feel and look of the interior materials, seams and where corners touch is pretty impressive for a truck in this segment."

He'll get no argument from me except in one key area: The front seats were uncomfortable. I couldn't find a good seating position the whole time we tested, and the manual adjustments feel cheap on a truck that costs north of $40,000.

 

Value

Winner: Tacoma (by a nose)

The ZR2, which starts at $41,990 (which includes destination) with the gas engine and eight-speed automatic transmission, offers exceptional value. But our test vehicle added the diesel engine ($3,500), and Bose stereo and a larger multimedia display ($995) that pushed the final price to $47,060.

That's a lot of money compared to the TRD Pro, which shakes out to $43,700 (including destination) with the automatic transmission selected. There aren't many options for the TRD Pro: How it is, is how it comes and you'd better like it. We would suggest providing multi-adjustable, electronically controlled seats to provide better comfort.

Williams gave a slight edge in this category to the Tacoma TRD Pro due to the differences in performance between it and the rest of the TRD lineup. Of course, we should note Chevy does offer a Z71 version that doesn't have all the bells and whistles or body mods found on the ZR2, but it does give it a viable contender in its own stable.

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Results

Winner: Colorado

It wasn't that long ago that the TRD Pro had no off-road peers. But that's changed since Chevy resurrected the ZR2 nameplate. And the Chevy engineers have certainly done something special with the ZR2. It's worth noting again that these two pickups use different strategies to deliver superior off-road manners and abilities, and our close scoring is a testament to how these trucks performed.

Of the nine categories, the TRD Pro won four (all by the slightest of margins), the ZR2 won three (all by wide margins) and two were a tie. In the end, the Colorado ZR2 scored 143 points, while the Tacoma TRD Pro scored 138 points, giving the win to the new off-road challenger, the 2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2.

Let us know what you think.

Editor's note: This post was updated July 31, 2017, to add the What You Get chart.

Cars.com photos by Evan Sears

 

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Comments

Sales numbers tell the real story.

@redbloodedxy: If that's the case then where does the Tundra stand against Ford, RAM and GM?

When I reading the article, it sounded like the Taco was going to win. Anyway, a very close outcome.

I wonder what the results would have been with the GM V6 and eight speed? I would imagine this would the ZR2's most popular drive train.

Looks like taco won to me. The chevy is just boring, not sure why anyone would ever buy one of these little crappy off roaders

Oxi is gonna be mad.

Realistically, it should have been the 3.6 gas against the Toyota. The gas v-6 smokes the Tacoma, and 8 speed made huge acceleration gains, though not mileage.

@NoQDRTundra re: where the Tundra stands...it is driving to work/errand/road trip/whatever while your GM/Ford/Fiat are in the shop again.

Well based on the category wins for Toyota, it's pretty clear that if the ZR2 had come with the Six Cylinder Gas engine instead of the Diesel, it would have won by a landslide! Why wasn't this noted or talked about? 3 of the categories that Toyota won were: Powetrain, Acceleration, and Dirt/Sand Running which are all tied specifically to the engine. GM's gas version has more power and comes with an 8 speed transmission compared to Toyota's 6 speed, so it's pretty obvious that the Colorado would have performed better than the diesel and won these categories as well.

Next time, why don't you guys compare apples to apples in a comparison test like this that's going to include so many categories tied to the powertrain? That's like doing an HD Shootout Comparison and having one truck with a Diesel and the other with a gas version. Each motor is built for specific tasks and does certain tasks better than the other. This comparison should have been done with both trucks equipped with gas motors. Period. The fact that GM even offers a diesel option in this class should be a further selling point but to penalize this Colorado for it when a more comparable gas version is available that would have further distinguished it as the head to head winner equals bad journalism on your part. That's like picking an HD truck the winner in a comparison test because of its newer interior............oh wait. LOL!! 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

From what I've seen on the forums, many of the ZR2 owners have come from late model Tacos. The new Tacomas are not the truck they used to be. The Colorado is the new king of the midsized truck.

Sales numbers tell the real story.

Posted by: redbloodedxy | Jul 31, 2017 8:09:47 AM

Where is the Ranger?

Where is the Ranger?????? OH if you need a truck you need a F-150 .

Not a valid test. Colorado should come with the v6 to be an apples to apples contest. The Chevy would win the shootout by a large margin.

I'm with Chris on this one. need apples to apples comparison not watermelon to cantelope comparison. even then the Colorado would have won every catargory except the interior.

I know one guy who had a Taco, went to get a new truck, drove the Colorado, but bought a new Taco, cause he was use to the interior layout of the Taco, not cause he did not like the Collie...

my wife is the same way, she does not want a new vehicle cause she will have to re-learn everything.....

"@redbloodedxy: If that's the case then where does the Tundra stand against Ford, RAM and GM?"

Where do you think it stands? Heheheh! I know for sure the Tundra is inferior to the F-150. I won't speak for RAM or the GM twins.

Tacoma won more categories but yet the fake news from CNN rates the Colorado the winner?

Not surprised at all!

Toyota won 6-5 in categories but lost?

I'm not sure how you can cry about how hard it was to get the Tacoma up your articulation pile in one paragraph, and in another state that the crawl control is absolute point and shoot.
Suspension is definitely the ZR2's ace. The front locker is neat, but in most situations the rear locker and traction control function will get the job done just the same. I would love to see the multi-mode t-case from other Toyota products available in the Tacoma.

"Tacoma won more categories but yet the fake news from CNN rates the Colorado the winner?

Toyota won 6-5 in categories but lost?"

Don't believe everything you read on the internet. GM has a ton of media influence.

I think they for this article they should of kept things strictly off road focused. Most of us know the pros and cons of the trucks themselves but were more interested in seeing how they stacked up off road. TBH I was expecting the article to be a little more in depth but not bad considering I haven't seen another review site get a chance to directly compare these two.

To those thinking compare apples and oranges, the TRD Pro is the top off-road trim of the Tacoma as for bail out GM the ZR2, so the answer to that is simple, NO!

We are comparing apples to apples here!

The standard TRD off-road would be up against the bail out GM ZR1.

And why do you guys want more gears? More gears mean more problems and less longevity. Must be millennials or something?

I would still choose the Tacoma TRD Pro for obvious reasons:

Almost $4,000 less.

Can be modded much easier that the ZR2, that is shocks and suspensions.

Lower operating costs with a gas engine and easy to swap out shocks.

Better value in the long run with higher retention of value.

I live where it gets cold in the winter, the diesel does not do well in cold weather without fuel additives, etc...

The Tacoma has a PROVEN platform unlike the GM, so that is a big plus with me!

The problem with this test IMO is that nothing broke. - And that means they didn't get tested to the limits. I know that they are loaner trucks and the OEMs want them back clean and ready for the next magazine to use. But if you're not testing the limits - you're not really testing offroad capability. The perfect example is the desert race events. The Ford Raptor checks all the boxes for desert race trucks. It does great in reviews - but it doesn't fare so well in ACTUAL racing. Why? It always breaks down. It barely limped through the Baja 1,000. It got smoked by the Tacoma in the Mint 400. As a few recent examples. On paper and by review it should run away with podium finishes. The same is the issue here. The review doesn't tell us anything about how hard you can push these trucks. Obviously the ZR2 rear shock mounts would last about 10 seconds in real rock crawling, but that wasn't really attempted here. Similarly the Tacoma could use better transfer case skid protection. Again - not really tested here.

For those of us who do use them offroad - the first thing we typically do is toss the OEM suspension in the recycle bin. What does that mean for the GM setup? Can you find some way to retain it? Does it work the same outside of it's static ride height? Or is it basically a very expensive set of shocks to throw away? The TRD Pro Fox shocks are 7 stage internal bypass shocks, not mentioned in the article. If you want to actually desert race - they're a lite version of the real deal. But without overheating them we have no idea how good they really are.

And to be clear it's not the magazine's fault. They have limits on what they can do. The problem is that you can't do a realistic review within those limits. I REALLY hope GM will race a ZR2 head to head with the Tacoma and Raptor in a few desert races. Then we'll get to see how they compare in a true test to the limit of their performance.

Scores of 143 to 138 is a difference not large enough to shake a stick at, since the "by the nose" was a frequent comment. And what is the reproducibility of the scores (i.e., if everyone on the staff did the evaluation again week later, not knowing the previous results, how much would they fluctuate?)

They are both good trucks, and it's good the see the Colorado really in the game.

But I would venture that purchase decisions may be based on things other than those tested here, like:
1) Appearance (exterior and interior)
2) Reputation
3) Long-term reliability
4) Ease of repair
5) Dealership/factory incentives and final price

======================

I called the Colorado in the first comment in the previous head to head article. But secretly I worried that Lionel and his pixie dust Ranger would magically appear and take the crown. HAHAHAHA!.....LOL......HAHAHAHA.....HAAAAaaa!

A few other thoughts that could really improve the article if it were added:

What material and gauge are the OEM skids made from? I know the TRD Pro has 1/4 aluminum - they're beefy. What does GM use? Is it tin foil, or something that can will hold up to dropping on rocks?

Does the ZR2 use an aluminum driveline? That's a common failure point on these trucks. Without a carrier bearing to keep that shaft up out of harm's way and a low pinion - it's going to be a big problem. The Tacoma as a comparison has a carrier bearing to keep the shaft up high, and also has a pinion output that is up higher just as a result of the differential design. Having seen them break and ridden over rocks on my drive shaft, an aluminum shaft is a big liability.

What is the length of the control arms? The ZR2 uses longer control arms which IMO is the right way to go. Toyota is lacking on that front. But, are they actually longer than the OEM tacoma ones? That would be something important to know as it gives a good idea of what is possible suspension wise up front.

It would also be great to have some side by side measurements of things like steering joint size. Ball joint size and range of motion. The Toyotas have bolt on lower ball joints - so you never separate the joint to remove the spindle. Two bolts and it's apart. When you break a shaft on the trail - that's a HUGE benefit to the newer Toyota design over older Toyotas. Did GM follow suit and make trail repairs easier? What size are the shafts and joints? Again a few measurements would go a long way to get an idea of whether the GM front shafts and joints are up to the task. My GM HD2500 shaft broke with an open front differential and stock tires. Twisted off at the splines. No way it would handle any larger tire or front locker. I assume GM stepped up the shafts for this truck, but I'd love to see one side by side to see how they compare.

Also put a front and rear wheel bearing on the table next to each other. Compare size and design. Those are other parts that indicate durability.

Anyway - just some more thoughts on what would help improve on the article for folks who might be serious about offroad or overland use and want to compare these trucks. Thanks!

GM should have done better. The ZR2 is supposed to be some halo vehicle but barely beat a Taco with some Fox shocks. smh. GM loses to Ford once again.

A huge issue for me is reliability and being problem free. Any Chevy, Ford, Ram/Fiat will have issues by 100k. Where as a Toyota truck will go up to 300k without issues if maintained halfway decently. Consumer reports stats even show that the Toyota and Honda trucks are the ONLY reliable trucks with Ford/GM in middle and old Ram/Fiat always dead last.

"GM should have done better. The ZR2 is supposed to be some halo vehicle but barely beat a Taco with some Fox shocks. smh. GM loses to Ford once again."
Posted by: Fred

Well-said. With a few exceptions, GM routinely does just enough to get by. Too bad for the sheep who buy them.

Pretty sure you won't find many TRD PROs sitting on the lot waiting for buyers, no $ on the hood. I'll have to stop by the local Chev dealer to see what kind of discounts are being thrown at the ZR2s already. The real winners are decided by the marketplace, it's not even close in that arena.

@Jack: I was out of my Tundra for 25 days; I drove several Nissans, Camrys and Corollas.

The TRD Pro is and has been racing in the desert and winning with drivers like Jay Leno in the stock classes!

reliability and resale value is where its at for me.

That was an easy to read well written review comparison.

I do believe the scoring or better the difference between the winner and loser is accurate.

Here in Australia the Colorado's 2.8 diesel isn't a well received engine by the reviewers as there are better diesels out there. But, in the US you only get the one diesel midsizer which is a pity.

I do like the suspension on the ZR2 it's quite nice as is the diff locks.

Well, even though the Taco tested is considered new, it is actually a heavily revised old Taco and this shows.

Maybe or even hopefully the next Taco will be a Hilux. Here in Australia TRD Hiluxes are just stickers and some accessories, not real moded suspensions.

I don't think it will be possible for any midsizers to produce a factory modified off roader that will sell in Australia. Even the FX4 Ranger is just some stickers, roof racks and nothing else. It has been termed a "rip off". Our factory 4x4s generally come well equipped for off roading.

Things to consider:

Are the GM shocks rebuildable/serviceable? If not then that is a huge cost down the road for disposable shocks...

I would be willing to bet that the Tacoma's Fox's are rebuildable/serviceable. This is a huge benefit for the Tacoma. Plus if you wanted to ditch the Fox setup anything that bolts into a regular Tacoma will bolt right up to the TRD Pro suspension.

The gas Colorado also lacks low end torque, and it would have the same complaints that the 3.5 Taco engine did in regards to lack of low end torque.

Things to consider:

Are the GM shocks rebuildable/serviceable? If not then that is a huge cost down the road for disposable shocks...

I would be willing to bet that the Tacoma's Fox's are rebuildable/serviceable. This is a huge benefit for the Tacoma. Plus if you wanted to ditch the Fox setup anything that bolts into a regular Tacoma will bolt right up to the TRD Pro suspension.

The gas Colorado also lacks low end torque, and it would have the same complaints that the 3.5 Taco engine did in regards to lack of low end torque.

It would have been interesting to see the V6 Colorado in the test, but at the same time it was nice to see the little Duramax in a comparison test. If the V6 was in the test, then pricing would have been very close. Both really cool trucks!

I don't see running out of high rpm power much of an issue for 99% of the motoring public. Who rev's their engines that high?

The new Tacoma has been panned almost everywhere for its new engine. Durability has also dropped.

I'd take my chances with the Colorado but pony up for the extended warranty just in case.

Anyone got experience with a ZR2 diesel with regular wheels/

What kind of mileage do you get?

The bumper makes really very little difference in mileage, it is really for cooling when towing hard. But the extra weight of the ZR2 gearing etc.

So if I just put the off-road wheels in my garage most of the time, what can I get for MPG?

As several have pointed out ....this is really no contest.

The categories the Tacoma won , it won ONLY because it was against a DIESEL ....which is NOT meant for the same type of duty. Does Toyota offer a diesel? Uh , no.....

Chevy V6 ZR2 is hundreds of pounds lighter than diesel and has nearly DOUBLE the hp of the diesel AND the 8 spd transmission. It slaughters the TRD in acceleration , especially now that Toyota has hampered the Taco with the new and significantly crappier new V6 with Miller cycle.

With V6 they are nearly same price. Chevy faster and way better suspension , offers things you cant get in Taco like front locking diff and diesel power and spool valve wonder shocks. More ground clearance better brakes ......its just NO contest.

As several have pointed out ....this is really no contest.

The categories the Tacoma won , it won ONLY because it was against a DIESEL ....which is NOT meant for the same type of duty. Does Toyota offer a diesel? Uh , no.....

Chevy V6 ZR2 is hundreds of pounds lighter than diesel and has nearly DOUBLE the hp of the diesel AND the 8 spd transmission. It slaughters the TRD in acceleration , especially now that Toyota has hampered the Taco with the new and significantly crappier new V6 with Miller cycle.

With V6 they are nearly same price. Chevy faster and way better suspension , offers things you cant get in Taco like front locking diff and diesel power and spool valve wonder shocks. More ground clearance better brakes ......its just NO contest.

That little rice burner just got smoked by GM! Bring on the Ford Claptor next and watch GM crush it too. HAHAHAHA!!!

Good comparison. Wish you could have used the V6 Colorado to prevent the apples to apples complaints. I'd probably be happy with either truck.

First reading though the comments I would like to remind most the these trucks are for people that want the extra but are not expecting to do lots of suspension modes. If you are doing that you would start with a cheaper model. Here are some things that have not been commented but does not do anything for going offroad. First up here in Canada the trd pro is very hard to find and only comes in three colors but if you ever find o e you have to take what you find. The trd pro does have keyless entry and push button start. One you have this you just can't believe why not all are like this. As for the zr2 diesel I would like to hear more about it's reliablity as I read lots about the exhaust system sensors and blue stuff having problems needing to bring it in for flushes and new sensors. Never want that for daily driver. Would have been nice if they did testing on v6 to v6.
Again for someone that is not doing lots of upgrades being able to add primiume audio is nice don't know why pro does not have or offer. The pro in Canada has the sunroof for me that a good thing for others maybe not.


I called the Colorado in the first comment in the previous head to head article. But secretly I worried that Lionel and his pixie dust Ranger would magically appear and take the crown. HAHAHAHA!.....LOL......HAHAHAHA.....HAAAAaaa!

Posted by: GMSRGREAT | Jul 31, 2017 10:28:27 AM

@GMSUCKS; actually in my country, the 2.8 TD in the Colorado's/D-MAX are just ok, Ranger's 3.2 TD smokes & runs rings around it (I know, buddy has one & I keep embarrassing him everywhere street or off-road).

So knowing Ford will only improve it's power plant offerings for the US version, you can already predict the wimpy US Colorado will be left in the dust...again...HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

In all honesty, Toyota needs this kick in the azz to wake up. They only made minor tweaks to the Tacoma because they knew GM was bringing their trucks to the U.S. They have sold these trucks and other products based on urban legend that they're bullet proof. We all know they are definitely not rust proof on top of several other issues they've had (like every manufacturer).

GM should have done better. The ZR2 is supposed to be some halo vehicle but barely beat a Taco with some Fox shocks. smh. GM loses to Ford once again.
Posted by: Fred | Jul 31, 2017
/QUOTE

Taco is made by Ford now??

Ford doesnt even offer small truck...you better quit smoking the funny tabaky kiddo,,

No doubt the ZR2 wins overall by points and would have dominated in this particular test with the V6. It's just amazing to me how many yota fans get so upset when their product loses. The Tacoma is a great truck and many will agree but it's really out of its league in this test. Sure it may last for 500,000 miles but people that afford these trucks are not worried about keeping a truck for 20 years. Get serious, there will be newer better things out we will want in the next few years. I've had my GMC for 9 1/2 years now with no real issues but guess what? I'm ready for a new truck just like everyone else that can afford it. So there goes the "it will last longer argument".. I would much rather be happy in a truck I have for 5-7 years tearing up the dirt than trying to be gentle and reach 1,000,000 miles on the original engine, lol.. it's just crazy that people can't admit their favorite manufacturer needs a drastic makeover.

When it was all said and done the Chevy needed a trans rebuild and the 3.6L needed 3 stretched timing chains replaced.

Ranger's 3.2 TD smokes & runs rings around......

Posted by: Lionel | Jul 31, 2017 5:29:22 PM

That's been a problem with Fords for decades.

see us again at 150,00 miles. see which truck is still hammering thee wins. better yet, at 300,000.

I suspect Toyota would sell a lot more Tacos if they'd just put halfway-decent seats in the trucks. As it is, you feel like you're riding in a lifted go-cart, but maybe that's what the kids like nowadays....

I'd like to know which truck is expected to last longer. Could one expect to put 300,000+ miles on each, or would one rust out, blow up before the other? Also, resale value? Are they equal or does one have an advantage over the other?
Thanks!



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