Ford Adds Turbo-Diesel to 2018 F-150 Engines

F-150 diesel 5 II

The 2018 Ford F-150 will offer six engine choices for 2018, including a new Power Stroke turbo-diesel. That means consumers can choose from three V-6 EcoBoost engines, two naturally aspirated gas engines (one V-6, one V-8) and the new turbo-diesel 3.0-liter 60-degree V-6. The overall weight penalty for the new engine is about 300 pounds when compared to the EcoBoost engines.

The 24-valve turbo-diesel will make 250 horsepower and 440 pounds-feet of torque. The engine is the same diesel currently used in Jaguar, Land Rover and Range Rover vehicles, and is built in the United Kingdom, sourced from the Ford-designed Lion engine family. Although EPA fuel-economy numbers have not been established yet, Ford is hoping the diesel F-150 will be the first half-ton pickup to get a rating at or above 30 mpg highway.

Currently, only the mid-size Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon equipped with the inline four-cylinder turbo-diesel 2.8-liter get a 30-mpg highway rating from the EPA. The Ram 1500 EcoDiesel HFE (the only other half ton to offer a small diesel engine) received a 29-mpg highway rating when it was available in 2016.

Ford's new diesel uses a water-cooled variable vane turbocharger and will be mated to the 10-speed transmission with automatic stop-start capabilities. The engine block is made of compacted graphite iron for added stiffness and strength, and the heads are aluminum. Ford said it has made several upgrades to the crankshaft, the injection system, connecting rods and various engine bearings. The engine will include a 5.4-gallon diesel exhaust fluid tank, allowing the fluid to be injected into the exhaust stream to lower emissions levels. The tank will be located directly behind the fuel tank and filled from the same fuel door.

F-150 Diesel 3 II

Interestingly, the new diesel engine will not offer a multisetting exhaust brake switch (like that found in the Super Duty) to help with heavy loads or large trailers during descent down steep hills, but it will offer a slightly more aggressive engine-braking setting when the Tow/Haul mode is selected. The diesel F-150 will also include a selectable boost and DEF gauge within the information screen.

Ford is expecting the take rate for the new diesel to be around 5 percent of total F-150 sales, which is likely to be around 25,000 sales.

Retail customers can order Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum SuperCrew diesels with either 5.5- or 6.5-foot beds; SuperCab versions of those trims will be offered with a 6.5-foot bed. For most setups, diesel F-150s will either have 3.55:1 or 3.31:1 axle gearing.

Fleet customers can get the diesel across all trim levels as a SuperCrew with a 5.5- or 6.5-foot bed or a SuperCab with a 6.5-foot bed. 

The diesel will cost an extra $2,400 over the 3.5-liter EcoBoost for XL and XLT models, $3,000 over the 5.0-liter V-8 for King Ranch and Platinum models, and $4,000 over the 2.7-liter EcoBoost for the Lariat.

The baby Power Stroke will be available for ordering later in January, but diesel F-150s likely won't arrive at dealerships until spring. The Ford F-150 also will get a hybrid powertrain before the end of the decade.

Manufacturer images

 

F-150 Diesel 4 II

F-150 Diesel 6 II

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5 II

 

Comments

@ Frank

Worst motor?

The Essex V-6 motors might take that cake, and that's saying something because i once bought a $100 Chevy Vega. I got sixty thousand miles out of that little oil burner.

I had four different cars with that engine and they all sucked. I've never met anyone who owned one and liked it.

One of my Essex motors died before it had 90k miles on it.

All suffered from bad cooling system and EGR issues. Ford eventually tinkered with the 4.2 version of the Essex sufficiently to make it a decent engine, but that was almost 20 years after the first ones came out.

Don't worry Ford will claim best in class everthing as they always do.
They'll claim 40 mpg but will actually get around 23 !!!!
Will be able to tow 20,000 lbs. And actually be able to tow 5000 safely.
Always over rated junk.... lol

We both can sit here and re-tell the Auto History. Both Ford & GM had an extensive list of garbage.

The early 1980s 350 GM diesel was available in cars and trucks.


Posted by: papajim | Jan 8, 2018 3:28:05 PM

I'll give you that one, I forgot about it, maybe because it was the worst motor ever produced.

Sorry, unreliable diesel such as that didn't stick well as they were/are laughable.


Posted by: Frank | Jan 8, 2018 3:37:01 PM


-----------

it was an interesting attempt at a low cost diesel. If it would have held up better initially it would have gotten great mileage and been very cheap to produce. Contrary to most beliefs it was not a standard Olds 350 modified to run diesel. Almost every component was strengthened.

I do recall some people back then with 2wd chevy pickups using them for highway commutes. They were getting 30 mpg!!!! They were never meant for heavy duty use.

Frank,

6.0 powerstrokes can go right in the same dumpster with these.

6.0 powerstrokes can go right in the same dumpster with these.


Posted by: andrwken | Jan 8, 2018 4:29:27 PM

Nope, the 6L had way better reliability and are built bullet proof. Can't do that to a GM 350 Diesel.

I see many 6L Diesel on the road today, I never seen a GM 350 Diesel, oh wait, nope never seen one.

Nope, the 6L had way better reliability and are built bullet proof. Can't do that to a GM 350 Diesel.

I see many 6L Diesel on the road today, I never seen a GM 350 Diesel, oh wait, nope never seen one.
Posted by: Frank | Jan 8, 2018 5:08:48 PM

You have to dump $15,000 in a 6-blow to make it truly bulletproof. For that kind of money you could probably even build up a GM 350 diesel and make it work. And even after you dump all that money in a 6-blow, you're still stuck with a truck whose frame is so flimsy you'd swear it was made of wet spaghetti. Especially after it's been through 10 years of salty winter roads and rot has set in. My 04 F-250 flexed so much on our mountain access roads it would chew up the body mounts and the core support would flex so bad it caused the radiator to crack. Replaced the radiator twice before I gave up on the junk Ford radiator and put in a quality Mishimoto radiator.

Crunchtime, those diesels are 2016-17's, go to diesel forumsor the Ford/Ram/Chevy truck forums and you will see many guys on there talking about them not able to start the last few weeks.

Finally. A diesel is better suited for a work vehicle. Much better foir towing and hiway cruising. Can't wait for this to come out. I will get rid of my ecoboost in a heartbeat, when you work this ecoboost the fuel economy is terrible. A diesel gets better fuel economy when worked, and does not need to rev to do so.

JLR will add 2 cylinders to their in-house 2.0 I4 "ingenium" diesels, and being a newer design will probably be more efficient. But Ford's 3.0 V6 is still good and is well tested. Could make it's way in the F-150, some SUV's or the Ranger.

Cool, took a while considering they’ve had this engine available for a while, but that’s just some extra reassurance for durability and longevity. Haven’t researched that 3.0 too much but by now they’ve hopefully worked out the kinks and reinforced what needs it. I’d consider this over a 5.0. The 5.0 is a darn good engine though. Depends on the needs of the individual

I'm waiting for the Hybrid.

@dave. The diesels you are referring to were in the upper states that had not received proper winter fuel blending and gelled. Here in Canada the new Diesel pick ups start up just as easy as a gaspot motor. Even in -40 weather. With 5 event injectors and super fast glow plug systems, you don't have any cold start issues with CRD engines. We have a fleet of Duramax diesels at the mine site that fire up immediately and no smoke or smell, fantastic technology. I guarantee the take rate for the Diesel F150 will be at least 15%.
Look at when GM introduced the 2.8l inline 4 Duramax Diesel in the mid size trucks and estimated a 10% take on diesels, then couldn't keep up with demand. The take rate is now 25% Diesel over the high reving gas engine that sucks when it comes to towing, gets 9mpg.

Dave, they must have issues with them then, I have never heard of the newer ones having trouble starting and we have temps -20 here.

-CT

belt makes it easy for inspection. timing chains can go randomly. also belt can easily be replaced without taking the front cover off the motor.

@3.5 Ford. Yamaha R 1

you seem a little confused about cold weather diesel performance. Diesel engines simply perform better when they are fully warmed up. The same is true for gasoline engines, but not to the same extent. Diesel fuel has a lot of "energy per gallon" which is why they're so much more efficient than gas engines.

That said, gas engines are more practical when there's a lot of short-trip driving involved.

The typical family guy with a half ton truck probably does a fair amount of local trips, groceries, hardware store, soccer field, commuting. A guy who uses a full size pickup for extended trips with big loads will appreciate a diesel more; the family guy less so.

This is even more true in northern locales.

papajim--That is outdated info from 10 years ago when you bought your last truck. Try keeping up with the times. Diesel halftons are for buyers who prefer diesel. They don't care if they go on a 10 mile trip or a 100 mile trip. It doesn't matter to the diesel enthusiast. They must have a diesel and hate gas.

The new diesels, not the ones from the 60s dump trucks and 70s pickups, papajim knows and is talking about perform with no problems in northern states today. All engines perform the same on on a short trip to the soccer game as they do on a 100 mile trip to the casino. Jim doesn't know the new engines and is still hung up on the 2004 5.3 V8 2wds and the the memories of trucks he drove in 1970. Back up your post with current evidence if you find otherwise.

I just saw that Achates will show their new 37 mpg truck engine at NAIAS next week.

I like how you left off the part where it will probably get 2x the fuel mileage in real world driving.

The eco-boost is a cycle beater not a truck motor, most people have accepted that at this point.


Posted by: devilsadvocate | Jan 8, 2018 12:26:35 PM

The EcoBoost is an absolutely amazing truck motor. Low rpm (diesel like) torque and high rpm horsepower. They tow phenomenal. You can get very good MPG if that's your thing or you can literally haul azz if that's your thing.

Wow lotta folks having a HARD time with the REALITY that GM only puts the 6.2 V8 in less than 5% of its HALF TON TRUCKS really only for advertising bragging rights. Doesn't matter whats in low volume luxery SUV sales, special Camaros, or covvettes. Talking full size 1/2 ton trucks folks. Compare apples to apples. The EBs still outperform them. Remember 95+% of chevy and GMCs on the road DONT have a 6.2 and that's how GM wants it even if you are reading this and do happen to have one or your brother has one or your cousin or you heard of one once or think you saw one but lost count when the displacement went past 5. The GMC/Chevy 6.2 in a half ton is nothing more than an advertising bragging play and a poor one at that with other current offerings.

"2018 F-150 is targeted to have an EPA estimated rating of 30mpg with 3.0-liter Powerstroke for Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum edition Trucks........" It's a unicorn marketing gimmick. Glad I don't want one.

http://cars.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451b3c669e201b8d2cdbcfd970c-pi

Somebody let the FAKE Jeff S off the chain again!

Wow lotta folks having a HARD time with the REALITY that GM only puts the 6.2 V8 in less than 5% of its HALF TON TRUCKS

@Clint,

Every 1/2 GMC Denali has a 6.2. Every, Yukon Denali has a 6.2. Every Escalade has a 6.2.

The 6.2 is also available in GMC SLT trim and Silverado LTZ ans well as the new Tahoe RST

A quick search of the 3 dealerships here around Austin netted 21 half-ton trucks with a 6.2.

@Jack

None of the Ford boys on this site want to acknowledge that Ford brass made a big mistake dropping the Ford 6.2 OHC V8 from the F150 lineup.

It was a superb choice for F150 owners who want more engine performance. I guarantee that if Ford brought it back it would sell.

Hint: back in 2012 Ford execs did not want the 6.2 to take sales from the Ecoboost V6, just as they were afraid of the Ranger taking value buyers away from the F150

What is the third ecoboost engine? This is the third or fourth time I've seen this in an article about the new diesel engine. I'm only aware of the 2.7EB and the 3.5EB in the trucks.

@Jack

None of the Ford boys on this site want to acknowledge that Ford brass made a big mistake dropping the Ford 6.2 OHC V8 from the F150 lineup.

It was a superb choice for F150 owners who want more engine performance. I guarantee that if Ford brought it back it would sell.

Hint: back in 2012 Ford execs did not want the 6.2 to take sales from the Ecoboost V6, just as they were afraid of the Ranger taking value buyers away from the F150


Posted by: papajim | Jan 9, 2018 3:56:59 PM

Ford made a better business decision here and the Ecoboost outsells the 6.2L by a long shot, no competition.

There is no need for Ford to offer the 6.2L when they already produce better and more powerful engine then GM's 6.2L

Do you have any sales stats on 6.2L Sales?

@ Frank--- YOUR A MORON

@ Frank--- YOUR A MORON


Posted by: Chingon | Jan 9, 2018 5:38:52 PM

It's you're, and you're a FAILURE!

I have had lots of new gen Diesel pick ups in the last 15 years. Never have I had a cold weather issue with them , even in -30 to -45 degree temps. Since I grew up around logging and ranching, I learned early that if you want an efficient engine for work and or daily driver, there is no better choice than Diesel. -20 out and my Duramax 2.8l will start immediately, idle for 30 seconds and drive off, in 4 minutes I have heat from vents . Quickest Diesel I have owned to get cabin heat and up to operating temps. The fuel economy is insane, tank average is 28 mpg. All hiway and it sits at 38 mpg. Towing is effortless and with 6200 lb travel trailer get 17 mpg. That is better than my wife's ecoboost gets empty driving herself to town and getting feed and supplies. We have a 3500 Dmax to tow our 40 ft livestock trailer, it sits for a month at a time in winter, fires up right away and no smoke or Diesel smell.

Just got this from somewhere else:

In addition to the Power Stroke’s segment-beating engine output, the F-150 oil burner also gets a whole lot of capability. The F-150 diesel offers a maximum payload of 2,020 pounds and a properly equipped towing capacity of 11,400 pounds. Those numbers handily beat the only other vehicle in the 1/2-ton diesel segment, the 240hp, 420–lb-ft, eight-speed automatic Ram 1500 EcoDiesel. That truck offers a maximum payload of 1,600 pounds and a towing capacity of 9,210 pounds.

For all you Dodge guys......ouch!

And lots have said Diesel is dead...... Not a chance. All half tons will be offering a Diesel by 2019. GM has Diesel mid size truck. Ranger will have Diesel. Toyota to have Diesel in Taco soon. Nissan has Cummins V8, All HD pickups have Diesel. The only way to tow or work a vehicle AND get good fuel economy, is Diesel.

For those that say the 3.0 is too small for 1/2 ton are wrong, the small diesels are putting as much or more power ( torque), than a 454 gas we used in 1 tons. Heck the 2.8L Duramax has as much torque as the current gas V8 as the current V8 in the 2500 trucks.
If you need more than 500 ft/lbs then you don't need a half ton, you need a 2500+ HD.

@Frank

I'll just stand on the previous statement. Ford made a mistake dropping the 6.2

Did you ever ride one or drive one? I did.

It was (and still is) the perfect engine for F150 trucks.

What is the third ecoboost engine? This is the third or fourth time I've seen this in an article about the new diesel engine. I'm only aware of the 2.7EB and the 3.5EB in the trucks.
Posted by: Joe | Jan 9, 2018 4:27:30 PM

There is no 3rd Eco-Boost as Mark implied. He likes to puff up ford's name.. The regular F150's have your normal 3.5 Eco-Boost with 375hp/470tq and the F150 Raptor has the high output 3.5 Eco-Boost with 450hp/510tq. It's not two 3.5 Eco-Boost as implied. They are still the same 3.5 Eco-Boost, the difference is the one on the Raptor gets a added boost to make bigger numbers.

There is no 3rd Eco-Boost
Posted by: uh huh | Jan 10, 2018

@uh huh

Actually there's a 2.3 4 cylinder ecoboost that is avaiable in Mustangs and Ford Explorers. It would be the perfect engine for the upcoming US Ranger, but so far I see no mention of a turbo 4 cylinder in Ford's plans for the mid size truck.

Remember 95+% of chevy and GMCs on the road DONT have a 6.2 and that's how GM wants it even if you are reading this and do happen to have one or your brother has one or your cousin or you heard of one once or think you saw one but lost count when the displacement went past 5. The GMC/Chevy 6.2 in a half ton is nothing more than an advertising bragging play and a poor one at that with other current offerings.
Posted by: Clint | Jan 9, 2018 2:36:59 PM

The 6.2 is EASY to get in a GM half-ton, just that most truck buyers just assume they can only buy a truck that's on the lot. Most dealers will bring in a truck from another dealer that has a 6.2 truck on the lot. You can also order a truck with the 6.2 and any incentives available at the time of delivery can even be applied to the price of the truck. You're not even under obligation to buy the truck when it shows up.

And as far as being compared to "other offerings", the 6.2 is the only big output engine that can do so reliably. The 3.5 Ecoboost continues to be an unreliable turd in its current configuration. Ford still uses the same cheap stretch-prone inverted tooth timing chains, same junk cam phasers that have had problems for several years now, same blow-by problems that push junk through the PCV system, same design choices that end up dumping tons of fuel in the engine oil, etc.

FRENCH DIESEL IN A FORD ...OIU !!! OUI !!!

Turbo-Diesel 3.0-liter V-6 developed with PSA Peugeot Citroën years ago is in the Ford !

MORE FORD POWERJOKE JUNK.
QUALITY IS JOB NONE.

Posted by: Chingon | Jan 8, 2018 8:41:08 AM

At least they don't rely on other companies (Isuzu/Allison, Cummins/Aisin) To build their engines and transmissions.

At least they don't rely on other companies (Isuzu/Allison, Cummins/Aisin) To build their engines and transmissions.
Posted by: Chris | Jan 13, 2018

@Chris

So imagine you're standing by the side of the road 10 miles from town and there's smoke pouring out from under the hood. At that moment do you really give a (bleep) where the engine was made?

Just asking...

@Maga
It was a Peugeot design diesel( i.e. Lion name) produced by Ford Dagenham UK for Ford and PSA. Currently a 3.2 litre version is in the Peugeot Dakar Buggies that are leading the Dakar Rally Raid that goes for 6000 kilometres



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