New Blizzak Snow Tire Targets Heavy-Duty Pickups

IMG_4008 II

If you do any driving in snow country or live in a part of the country that can get neck deep in snow for several months, you might want to seriously consider getting a set of dedicated snow tires.

The name Bridgestone Blizzak is legendary in the world of snow- and ice-road driving because of the tires' special compound and unique tread specifically designed to grab, void and hold snow so your vehicle can safely navigate roads. Previously the Blizzak W965 LT was offered only in 16- and 17-inch wheel sizes, but now a new generation of the Blizzak LT will cover 16-, 17-, 18-, and 20-inch rims. The all-new LT (which replaces the W965) will be offered in 11 sizes and will cost similarly to the previous tire. That means the new tire will be available on light- and heavy-duty pickup trucks and SUVs.

A few years ago we conducted a winter tire test in Steamboat Springs, Colo., where we compared five different, popular tires on a closed snow track. In the end, the P-metric Blizzak DM-V2 SL snow tire showed how and why it made our test F-150s safer in the snow when braking and navigating the winding track. Blizzak claims this new-generation LT is even better.

The new Blizzak tire has an all-new tread pattern with more zigzag biting edges for more grip as well as more evacuation channels to help reduce hydroplaning. The tire also features a new rubber compound that is supposed to extend the tire's life. Although pricing is not yet available, we expect the tires to start at a base price of $150 a tire when they go on sale in July.

For more information, go to Bridgestone.com.

Cars.com photo by Mark Williams; manufacturer images below

BlizzakLT_180[7] II

BlizzakLT_180[7]A II

BlizzakLT_60 II

BlizzakLT_90 II

 

Comments

I can't speak for Blizzak tire performance on a personal basis, however, I can say that tires labelled as ice radials have incredible bite on ice slick roads.

Several years ago pickuptrucks.com published an article entitled(and I quote you from copying and pasting the article THAT IS STILL PUBLISHED AND UNCORRECTED!),

"10 Things to Know About HD Truck Tires"
"Posted by Mark Williams | May 22, 2014"
about putting new tires on a truck.

Your eighth section, entitled:
"8. Replacing Two Tires"
gave deadly and illegal advice to your readers as from a position of a supposed "expert".

And I quote you, Mark,(copied and pasted from the article, mind you),
"If you are replacing only two tires, move the remaining pair of tires to the rear axle and put the new tires up front. "

You said if you only put two new tires on the truck, put them on the front. This is illegal in many states and extremely dangerous. Many people die and are injured every single year after getting this bad advice.

The law is clear that in any conditions(especially slick conditions), the rear wheels of any vehicle no matter what kind must have the better grip to avoid the rear of the vehicle from losing traction while the front keeps grip. This causes the vehicle to spin out of control and/or not brake correctly.

What's worse, is that you are supposed to be an expert in pickup trucks, where this problem is greatly exaggerated because pickups are lighter in the rear than other vehicles.

Many of us wrote in vigorously demanding you take down that article and publish a correction.
You did not, and completely ignored us.

Additionally, right aftrer the deadly, expert advice, you contradicted yourself in the same paragraph by writing

"Plus, according to some experts, most people can recover more easily from loss of traction to the front tires (understeer) than they can from loss of traction to the rear tires (oversteer)."

So, yoru article is totally contradictory and confusing and wrong.

But you did not listen to us at all!

So many of us left pickuptrucks.com and Mark and built up your competitor's comment section.

I just heard from another that you have posted an article asking for advice.

Well, we will see if you are sincere about that and care about the deaths you have caused in the last several years. Not to mention those who have been injured by the spreading and publishing of this deadly and extreemely badly writting and edited article.

You will probably never be able to counteract the death and estruction you have caused, but you can do your best for years to come, dilligently and repeatedly publishiing the correct advice.

We still DEMAND that you take down that article and publish a new article humbly apologizing for your callis and lazy "so called" expetise.

And the next year's article you published about winter driving entitled,
"Mismatched Tires Steer Toward Winter Trouble"
"Posted by Mark Williams | September 18, 2015"
is no excuse for not publishing a correction and an apology.
Especially when you STILL HAVE THAT OLD ARTICLE UP!.

IF you want to write about comparing vehicles, fine.
If you wan to write about matters of life and death, then you'd better get it right.
Otherwise, stay to your usual fluffy topics.
And post a correction when you do get it dead, wrong, just like legitimate journalists do.

I tried searching for the law that you speak of but my google search found nothing, although I did find this

Federal law requires CDL trucks to have the steer axle tires at 4/32" tread depth and drive axle tires at 2/32" tread depth.

don't like the Blizzak, rubber too soft and wears fast

my F-150 Eco-Boost is so powerful I can't pull out from a stop without spinning-burning tire

SHOW THE TREAD.

Tom, you are wrong... In the days of no ABS then maybe your point is valid but most of today vehicles have ABS and some even have stability control, I would rather have my most grip tires in the front, where most of my braking is done. My back tires that are not able to slow me down as much the ABS/stability control system will help keep that under control.

Tom, the majority of cars are front wheel drive, so you want the better traction on the front. That way you will get the best traction, best stopping grip and best steering control. on front drive vehicles you steer the way you want the vehicle to go not the direction you are sliding like in rear wheel vehicle.

Tom, please post the njmber of the law so we can all look it up

it hardly snows here anymore...

Tom, you are wrong... In the days of no ABS then maybe your point is valid but most of today vehicles have ABS and some even have stability control, I would rather have my most grip tires in the front, where most of my braking is done. My back tires that are not able to slow me down as much the ABS/stability control system will help keep that under control.

Posted by: NoWayHosEH
/QUOTE

If your ABS works corectly then ALL four wheels do almost the same amount of braking on slipery surface..ABS apply the brakes to wheels with most grip,its not the fronts all the time..

@Tom
As others already posted can you provide some of this info you speak of.?
I'm not saying your wrong but I would put the better tires on the front too?
IMO better steering/breaking grip. But if some research differs from that then I would like to know about it.

The blizzak tires are very good here in the winter. Best tire for ice and snow.

Tom, You are a moron.

You should all be put in jail for saying what is killing people on our roads every day.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/a3121/6-common-tire-myths-debunked-10031440/

and be sure to google

"two tires" rear

just like that into google.
And go rad each link and their results.

I want apologies from each of you commenters as well as pikcuptrucks.com.

Tom is misinformed. Stop with the misinformation campaign.

Alex and others,
then prove it!
I put links and gave keywords for searching.
You now prove your links and keywords for searching.
Otherwise, you are admitting you are wrong.

I thought so.

@Tom
Thanks for info I didn't know that.

Tom, do us all a favour and take the bus please. I’ve been through this and tire shops up here in Canada refuse to do what you’re saying because steering is sacrificed. 40% or less tread and you’re not allowed to leave the shop, it’s now a legal liability to them.

Tom your wasting your time.
With some people no mater what you say there always right. Unfortunately you you can't change they’re way of thinking.

Thanks Tom. We appreciate your passion and your excellent memory and we'll completely agree with you regarding the issue as it relates to snow, ice, or rain; however, the original story (which was written by one of our HD truck freelancers at the time) was speaking for HD pickups that would be likely hauling or carrying heavier loads. He says his implied assumptions were that this would be a dry-weather temporary solution that would be corrected with a matching set of tires at a later date. Clearly, that was not stated in the story. With all that said, you are exactly right about some states not allowing or restricting the practice and that for wet or cold weather, it is much better and safer to have the two new tires on the front steering axle, driven or not. With that said, there are some other points of view on the subject as well (https://www.souzastireservice.com/tires-101/front-or-rear.aspx). We've also updated this story, which is specifically about snow tires and traction, with more info and photos. As always, thank you guys for the high-level of discussion and holding us to a high standard. --MW

Here tire stores place the new ones on the back for safety in the rain. Makes sense so that's what I do.

This link tends to agree with Tom about putting the new tires on the back if the vehicle is a 4WD.

https://www.angieslist.com/articles/do-i-need-replace-all-four-tires-same-time.htm.

Most tire experts recommend replacing all 4 tires at the same time.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=18

All Wheel drive vs 4WD can be different especially Subaru
https://www.souzastireservice.com/tires-101/tire-matching-awd-4wd.aspx

It appears from this link that front wheel drive vehicles it is better to put the newest tires with the best tread on the front.

https://www.quora.com/If-I-could-only-replace-2-out-of-4-tyres-in-a-front-wheel-drive-car-where-would-be-best-to-put-them-on-front-or-back

More important if you do not drive much is to replace your tires because age of the tires which tires can degrade over time. Go by the production date of the tires and not how long you have had them. I have been driving less than in the past so I usually replace my tires every 7 years and give the old ones to my landscaper who uses them on his farm wagons (flat bed wagons hauled behind tractors for hay and straw bailing). Usually my tire tread is still very good when I replace them but at 70 plus mph I do not trust them after 7 years but these tires are perfectly good for a hay wagon. See link below.

https://blog.caranddriver.com/how-long-should-a-new-set-of-tires-last/


I look closely at the production date especially since my 2 trucks have 15's which are harder to get and many manufacturers have stopped making many 15's for trucks. Also it is a good idea to get your tires from a place that sells a lot of tires since their turnover is greater and there is less chance of buying tires that have been sitting in a warehouse for years. Tires degrade over time and any tire that is 10 years old should be considered unsafe for highway use at high speeds. I usually have to order the 15's because the truck tires are usually not in stock. Learn to read the tire production code. Never assume tires are still good based on appearance and tire depth. Always look at the production date, which I provided the link below.

https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/how-to-determine-the-age-of-your-tires

I'm glad I don't have to deal with these decisions.

I was in grade school when we lived in the mountains and have fond memories of snow. I love to visit, though no more than a week. I'm more acclimated to heat now and notice it is easier to cool down than it is to get my core temp back up.

I can appreciate the determination and expense it must take to live at higher latitudes. Lately I know it has been particularly brutal. Thanks for hanging in there. It's getting really crowded down here.

***********************
Update below:
***************************

Several years ago pickuptrucks.com published an article entitled(and I quote you from copying and pasting the article THAT IS STILL PUBLISHED AND UNCORRECTED!),

"10 Things to Know About HD Truck Tires"
"Posted by Mark Williams | May 22, 2014"
http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2014/05/10-things-to-know-about-hd-truck-tires.html
about putting new tires on a truck.

Your eighth section, entitled:
"8. Replacing Two Tires"
gave deadly and illegal advice to your readers as from a position of a supposed "expert".

And I quote the words you edited and approved, Mark,(copied and pasted from the article, mind you),
"If you are replacing only two tires, move the remaining pair of tires to the rear axle and put the new tires up front. "

You said if you only put two new tires on the truck, put them on the front. This is illegal in many states and extremely dangerous. Many people die and are injured every single year after getting this bad advice.

The legal regulations is clear that in any conditions(especially slick conditions), the rear wheels of any vehicle no matter what kind must have the better grip to avoid the rear of the vehicle from losing traction while the front keeps grip. This causes the vehicle to spin out of control and/or not brake correctly.

What's worse, is that you are supposed to be an expert in pickup trucks, where this problem is greatly exaggerated because pickups are lighter in the rear than other vehicles.

Many of us wrote in vigorously demanding you take down that article and publish a correction.
You did not, and completely ignored us.

Additionally, right aftrer the deadly, expert advice, you contradicted yourself in the same paragraph by writing

"Plus, according to some experts, most people can recover more easily from loss of traction to the front tires (understeer) than they can from loss of traction to the rear tires (oversteer)."

This plainly contradicts your first statement.

Oversteer is corrected by the better tires on the rear. Understeer is corrected by the better tires on the front, but understeer is far, far safer than oversteer. Therefore, the better tires should always be put on the rear to prevent oversteer the best.

So, yoru article is totally contradictory and confusing and wrong.

But you did not listen to us at all!

So many of us left pickuptrucks.com and Mark and built up your competitor's comment section.

I just heard from another that you have posted an article asking for advice.

Well, we will see if you are sincere about that and care about the deaths you have caused in the last several years. Not to mention those who have been injured by the spreading and publishing of this deadly and extreemely badly writting and edited article.

You will probably never be able to counteract the death and destruction you have caused, but you can do your best for years to come, dilligently and repeatedly publishiing the correct advice.

We still DEMAND that you take down that article and publish a new article humbly apologizing for your callis and lazy "so called" expertise.

And the next year's article you published about winter driving entitled,
"Mismatched Tires Steer Toward Winter Trouble"
"Posted by Mark Williams | September 18, 2015"
http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2015/09/mismatched-tires-steer-toward-winter-trouble.html
is no excuse for not publishing a correction and an apology.
Especially when you STILL HAVE THAT OLD ARTICLE UP!.

IF you want to write about comparing vehicles, fine.
If you wan to write about matters of life and death, then you'd better get it right.
Otherwise, stay to yoru usual topics.
And post a correction when you do get it dead, wrong, just like legitimate journalists do.

And if you still doubt that you are to put two new tires on the rear, then:

Watch these videos:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query="two+tires"+rear&sp=CAI%253D

And be sure to google

"two tires" rear

just like that into google.
And go study carefully each link and their results.

If you want me to do it for you, here is one of them for you:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYcTrzmePnU

And don't bring up the electronic stabilization argument. That is well debunked as only a partial help, but does not stop the deaths due to the error of putting better tires on the front.

And it does not matter what kind of vehicle you have(excepting only specific big rigs only--with very specific parameters).


*********************************************************

Now, Pickuptrucks.com, you have finally responded to me and many others after many years. I thank you for that, sincerely. But I am very sorry to see you have responded with yet more dangerous incompetence. How is this possible?

Look at your response:

--------------------------------------------
Pickuptruck.com

Thanks Tom. We appreciate your passion and your excellent memory

{Tom: I sincerely thank you for responding after 4 years}

and we'll completely agree with you regarding the issue as it relates to snow, ice, or rain;
{Tom: NO, the law applies to ALL CONDITIONS, and the physics backs that up}

however, the original story
(which was written by one of our HD truck freelancers at the time)
{Tom: YOU approved the article as the editor with your name on it. Do not seek to excuse yourself. YOU financially benefited from your deadly advice on your website edited by your hand and approved by your hand}}

was speaking for HD pickups that would be likely hauling or carrying heavier loads.
{Tom: NO, it does not matter what kind of vehicle it is excepting ONLY specific conditions for specific semi tractors}

He says his implied assumptions were that this would be a dry-weather temporary solution that would be corrected with a matching set of tires at a later date.
{Tom: NO, ther is no "later date" for those who have died in these crashes which DO happen in dry conditions. Even dry days on dry pavement people die with better tires on the front. And many dry days have slick conditions with pipes or sprinklers wetting the road often etc.}

Clearly, that was not stated in the story.
{Tom: Thank you for "kind of" admitting fault.}

With all that said, you are exactly right about some states not allowing or restricting the practice and that for wet or cold weather, it is much better and safer to have the two new tires on the front steering axle, driven or not.
{Tom: What!, what did you just say? You just said above that you still believe it is safer to have the better tires on the front! I am not being mean or harsh to you . Sincerely, do you have dislexia or are you paying attentionn to what youare writing? Are you drunk this morning? Really, I am not being a jerk or trying to humiliate you. I am trying to wake you up to what you just said and to what your original article still says on the internet with no alteration. Wow! You just said to put the better tires on the front. The laws say to put them on the rear. What is wrong with you?}

With that said, there are some other points of view on the subject as well (https://www.souzastireservice.com/tires-101/front-or-rear.aspx).
{Tom: Mark Williams! That article you linked to says to put the better tires on the rear. What is wrong with you!?}

We've also updated this story, which is specifically about snow tires and traction, with more info and photos. As always, thank you guys for the high-level of discussion and holding us to a high standard. --MW
{Tom: Mark, yes, thank you so much for clarifying your second article found at
http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2015/09/mismatched-tires-steer-toward-winter-trouble.html
that helps the situation,
BUT YOU STIL HAVE THE COMPLETELY FALSE ORIGINAL ARTICLE ON THE WEB!!!!!!!!!!!! here:
http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2014/05/10-things-to-know-about-hd-truck-tires.html
It is still having its effect as false, expert advice to unsuspecting motorists and killing people!
Mark Williams! TAKE DOWN THAT ARTICLE!!!!!!!!
Or, at least correct it and publish a new one profusely apologizig and correcting it.}

Posted by: Mark Williams | Feb 24, 2018 8:53:18 AM


And all you readers, ALWAYS put better tires on the rear no matter the situation or vehicle, excepting ONLY semi truck tractors who should know their applicable laws for their specific vehicle situation.


With respect to replacing only 2 new tires, I have to ask, how did you get to this point? If one is following proper maintenance schedules as outlined in the owners manual you would be rotating your tires every 6-8 thousand miles. I recommend every 5000 miles max. Following the proper tire rotation schedule outlined in your owners manual will maximize your tire tread wear on all wheels including your spare and help prevent handling issues such as tire pulls to the right or left.
If you should happen to destroy one worn tire of a set, make the new tire your spare and continue your tire rotation schedule now using the 4 tire pattern rotation on the vehicle. When the remaining 4 tires get worn down to the wear warning indicators, replace all 4 tires as a set and begin including your spare once again into the 5 tire pattern rotation.

Regarding changing only two tires all you need do is look at tire companies policies like Discount Tire that want profits over safety. They only install the old tire set to the fronts as they know you will be back shortly since the fronts wear more quickly especially with front wheel drive cars. They've been doing it for years and it borders on criminal.

@GMSRGREAT ,

Great post, and thanks. You are right, but you must not have done what I requested in my posting. You need to follow the links and do the google searches that I specifically illustrated.

If you had, you will see that it is now strongly recommended to always replace all four tires at once, and rotate very often. As you say.

But, you must know, because the world is not a dictatorship(thank goodness), a high percentage of people will choose to only replace two at a time. And many people are getting killed and disabled, and much destruction occurs when people put the better tires on the front.

So in that case, it is still the law in many states and still the laws of physics to put the best tires on the back.

So put the best tires on the back if you must only do only two tires.


@Ken,

Oh Ken, you are seriously mistaken.

The overall material of all your tires put all together in one mass measurement does not shed off the vehicle faster or slower according to where you put them on your vehicle.

Some vehicles lose more material off the front faster, some vehicles lose more material off the back quicker .

But the overall material is lost at the same rate no matter which set of tires goes on the front or back.
from
Ken, please go and STUDY carefully my links above and do the prescribed google searches I outlined above.

It may save your life or limb. Not to mention others around you.

Think about it. Discount Tire is a greedy business. They don't want to be put out of business or lose money for contributing to killing people. Their reputation is very important to them.

They know that you have to put the best tires on the back to keep the rear of your vehicle from spinning, because in that situation, you lose all control including steering and braking.

But if you put the better tires in the front, you will just lose steering for a time while retaining braking and overall control.

Better tires in rear:
equals loss of steering.

Better tires in the front:
equals loss of steering AND BRAKING, and thus all control.

Thanks Tom. Don't worry about the misinformed "tire pro's" here. People don't understand the front tires are more important than the rear.
Always use 4 winter tires from October to April.

Tom, I am only going to tell you this one more time. Do not spam our comments section.

@Admin,

Pickuptrucks.com will not tolerate commenters impersonating our employees, and your i. p. address will be permanently blocked from using our site if you do this again like your above post.

Thank you. -M.W.

Sean G.,

Oh, you got it backwards by accident , Sean.

You mean the rear tires are more important than the front.
Put the best tires on the rear when you choose not to get all four new tires.

Thanks, Sean. :)

Oh, Sean, to be more complete, there are some semi tractors that these rules do not apply to for physical reasons.

And there are laws for those situations separately.

But for all other vehicles, NEVER PUT the best tires on the front.

Several years ago pickuptrucks.com published an article entitled(and I quote you from copying and pasting the article THAT IS STILL PUBLISHED AND UNCORRECTED!),

"10 Things to Know About HD Truck Tires"
"Posted by Mark Williams | May 22, 2014"
about putting new tires on a truck.

Your eighth section, entitled:
"8. Replacing Two Tires"
gave deadly and illegal advice to your readers as from a position of a supposed "expert".

And I quote you, Mark,(copied and pasted from the article, mind you),
"If you are replacing only two tires, move the remaining pair of tires to the rear axle and put the new tires up front. "

You said if you only put two new tires on the truck, put them on the front. This is illegal in many states and extremely dangerous. Many people die and are injured every single year after getting this bad advice.

The law is clear that in any conditions(especially slick conditions), the rear wheels of any vehicle no matter what kind must have the better grip to avoid the rear of the vehicle from losing traction while the front keeps grip. This causes the vehicle to spin out of control and/or not brake correctly.

What's worse, is that you are supposed to be an expert in pickup trucks, where this problem is greatly exaggerated because pickups are lighter in the rear than other vehicles.

Many of us wrote in vigorously demanding you take down that article and publish a correction.
You did not, and completely ignored us.

Additionally, right aftrer the deadly, expert advice, you contradicted yourself in the same paragraph by writing

"Plus, according to some experts, most people can recover more easily from loss of traction to the front tires (understeer) than they can from loss of traction to the rear tires (oversteer)."

So, yoru article is totally contradictory and confusing and wrong.

But you did not listen to us at all!

So many of us left pickuptrucks.com and Mark and built up your competitor's comment section.

I just heard from another that you have posted an article asking for advice.

Well, we will see if you are sincere about that and care about the deaths you have caused in the last several years. Not to mention those who have been injured by the spreading and publishing of this deadly and extreemely badly writting and edited article.

You will probably never be able to counteract the death and estruction you have caused, but you can do your best for years to come, dilligently and repeatedly publishiing the correct advice.

We still DEMAND that you take down that article and publish a new article humbly apologizing for your callis and lazy "so called" expetise.

And the next year's article you published about winter driving entitled,
"Mismatched Tires Steer Toward Winter Trouble"
"Posted by Mark Williams | September 18, 2015"
is no excuse for not publishing a correction and an apology.
Especially when you STILL HAVE THAT OLD ARTICLE UP!.

IF you want to write about comparing vehicles, fine.
If you wan to write about matters of life and death, then you'd better get it right.
Otherwise, stay to your usual fluffy topics.
And post a correction when you do get it dead, wrong, just like legitimate journalists do.

Thank you. -M.W.

Posted by: Administrator | Feb 24, 2018 3:02:15 PM

You respond to that but not to the tire article you posted that is killing people?

How many people have you killed with your bad advice?

@GMSRGREAT--Most of the tire experts agree that it is better to do routine scheduled tire rotation every 6k miles and that way you have even wear and get 4 new tires at the same time. If you have uneven wear then it can be the alignment or your suspension. I usually get 4 new tires at the same time. It is best to know that not every vehicle is the same meaning the rotation pattern and where to put new tires on is different for a front wheel drive, 4 wheel drive, all wheel drive, and a rear wheel drive. As my links show they are not all the same. The one thing we know today that we weren't aware of is that tires degrade over time and that you cannot judge a tire to be safe by tread wear along.

I am not an advocate of mixing in new tires with worn tires. Tires should be replaced as sets (4 or 6) and not in pairs. Ensure that identical type, size and tread pattern exists to ensure smooth, even safe braking and control.


GMSRGREAT ,

Yes, ideally, but a small percentage of people do it that way, so what do you advocate when all those people only buy two new tires. Where do you say they put them?
We don't live in and ideal la la land.
So please still continue to advocate all four tires and frequent rotations, but also be very vociferous to get the word around to only put the two new tires on the back axle.
It is criminal to do anything else.

Is this an advert for Bridgestone, why not a comparison between rival brands for traction, handling, longevity, etc.

BREAKING NEWS !

BREAKING NEWS !

Consumer Reports just named the 2018 F-150 as the TOP PICK in full size pickups

Why would anyone need to buy just 2 tires? If you do upkeep on your tires and get them rotated on a regular basis, they would wear roughly the same amount so when the time comes to getting new tire, you should be buying all 4 anyways. Plus keeping a tire longer than 4-5yrs isn't so good even if it does have plenty of tread left because a tire that old develops weather deterioration and compromises the structural strength of the tire. Most common symptoms is cracking..

The best advice from this article has come from GMSRGREAT. (Thank You) As with everything that takes maintenance..., vehicles, houses, mowers, lawns..., you can cheapen your cost outlay. However, when safety is concerned..., plan ahead..., save-up the $$$. You can cheapen-out on your lawn (Gulp!!!) and live with the consequences, but ya gotta do something about that tree branch hanging over the house..., hmmm

LA; "you can cheapen your cost outlay"

Temporality, yes. But ignored repairs only grow worse with time and therefore cost more in the end.

For some reason I thought your moniker was Lawn Arranger.
Sorry, Sr. moment. Hah.

For some reason I thought your moniker was Lawn Arranger.
Sorry, Sr. moment. Hah.

@Stevadore..., no worries about the name...
100% agree with ignoring repairs..., I shoulda gone into that a little further..., Thanks

Always use 4 winter tires from October to April.

Posted by: Sean.G | Feb 24, 2018
/QUOTE

Not necesary imho,,
IF you use ALL season tires,,
I have Michelins all season tires on my truck,,2 wheel drive btw,,
And I got thru any snow and ice with ease,,but then I also have G80 locker rear diff,,and put heavy load of stuff in the back to get traction..

Yo ADMIN..
Why dont you OPEN the FORUM again and make this site more active interesting,,!?

Those tires will fill up with compacted snow and never clean out in deep stuff, over a long period.
In an urban environment, probably a great investment.
But in the mountains on unplowed gravel, something more aggressive that cleans out more quickly is a better choice.
Been here, done that, several times.
Some city guy always brings up a half-ton or SUV with “winter tires” and gets stuck. A couple hundo each weekend Thanksgiving to Christmas is nice. I just take the same truck, same tires that I use all year, plus straps, shovels, and traction aid (poop filtered kitty litter and salt).
About this 2 tires will kill ya nonsense.
If a person is that inept, perhaps staying home or riding the bus is imperative during bad weather.

Funny thing to announce in late February, rather than, say, October. Going on sale in July is just weird.
Interesting- Firestone stores will mount/balance Blizzaks from your summer tires every season, at no additional charge. That way, you only need one set of wheels.



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