Pickup Truck Sales Breakdown: January 2018

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The year is starting out pretty well for the pickup truck side of the auto industry, with most of the big truckmakers showing gains over January 2017 sales numbers. Only Ram, the GMC Sierra and the Honda Ridgeline experienced a decline.

Mid-size pickups remain on everyone's radar, with the all-new 2019 Ford Ranger getting plenty of attention at the 2018 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, and the next-generation Nissan Frontier rumored to debut before the year's end.

The top-selling mid-sizer, the Toyota Tacoma, had a strong month. It continued its 2017 momentum by outselling the light-duty and heavy-duty Sierras by more than 5,000 units. That meant the Tacoma started 2018 in the No. 4 position on our chart, moving up from No. 5 at the end of 2017. Chevrolet Colorado numbers for January were up almost 25 percent when compared to last year, with the Ridgeline falling into the bottom spot, selling just more than 2,000 vehicles.

In the full-size pickup sales, the Ford F-Series continued its domination, while Ram and GMC struggled. The Nissan Titans (Titan and Titan XD) maintained their 2017 momentum as well.

Looking at manufacturer sales numbers, GM continued to benefit from its unique three-truck strategy for each of its brands, meaning both Chevrolet and GMC offer a mid-size, a half-ton and a pair of heavy-duty pickups.

January is typically one of the weakest months of the year for auto sales, but we'll have to wait and see how long winter lasts to determine how pickup sales fare. Some analysts point to low interest rates, steady job gains and the recent tax reform to justify moderate optimism, but given how quickly things can change we're not making any predictions.

Manufacturer images; Cars.com graphics by Paul Dolan

 

 

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Comments

When is the KBB 2018 results going to be published here?

Just because the two best trucks for retention of value are the Tacoma and Tundra does not mean a media blackout!

If the Colorado was tops, oh boy this would have been front page news!

The reason why the F-150 leads in sales is because they are lower cost.
You can get between $12K to $15K off sticker price on a new F-150.
Heck ! You can buy a NEW F-150 for LESS than a used F-150 !

when you walk into a Silverado or Ram Dealer and ask for a discount the dealer sticks his nose up in the air and if you're lucky you'll get $3000 off

when you visit any Chevy or Ram dealer take a notice that they stock twice as many used trucks than new trucks, they keep the price high on new so they can sell their used trucks at a higher profit

you got to have rocks for brains when a dealer wants $40K for a used Silverado with high mileage when you can get a NEW F-150 for $33K

"You can buy a NEW F-150 for LESS than a used F-150 !"

That's because the 2015+ F-150's are worth-less and the steel F-150's are more sought after. Between the junk aluminum bodies and the cheap plastic 4WD system, the "military-grade" F-150's are throwaway trucks. Throwaway trucks because you're basically throwing your money away when you sign the papers to buy one.

can PUT.com please delete all these worthless brand bashing posts?? Just clogging up the comments section...

Sure glad at least one person has and uses common sense on this blog. Thank-You and great post Blackdragon.


Ford has the newest half-ton and newest 3/4 and 1-ton. They sold nearly 900k full-size trucks. YET, Ford's pre-tax profits for 2017 are DOWN $1.5 billion. If Ford can't increase profits while selling the most full-size trucks they've sold in the last decade, there's no hope for them. Especially as they are projecting material costs for aluminum to increase again, just as they did in 2017. Not only is the aluminum F-150 the weakest and least durable new half-ton, Ford's profits on each one are shrinking as material costs are up and incentives are higher than they had hoped. Despite all the fanboys gloating that aluminum would be a game changer that would push ATP's sky-higher, the actual ATP's so far are very unimpressive considering the F-150's MSRP can now climb into the mid $70k range and the Superduty line can climb to nearly $100k. Why are ATP's so dismal despite the F-series being the latest and 'most capable' F-series trucks yet (as the ads would have you believe)?

All those billions spent to develop a "game changing" aluminum F-series line-up. Trucks with higher material costs, weaker beds/bodies, and only a marginal fuel economy improvement. Sales are only up slightly, ATP's have grown by a small amount but relative to the latest MSRP's are very unimpressive, and pre-tax profits are down. Ford's CEO was fired last year and his replacement slashed the R&D budget for internal combustion engines in half in order to help fund mobile electronics and electric cars. Oh and Ford's stock valuation today is $10.76. 1 year ago it was $12.38. Four years ago it was $14.57. Are you sure you want to bring up financial health of GM vs Ford? Because Ford shares look like they're slowly turning into toilet paper.

Posted by: Blackdragon | Feb 8, 2018 1:36:27 AM

Dear PUTC..., The next time you decide to photoshop my brand new truck into an article..., please do not remove my โ€œThe Lawn Rangerโ€ decals from the side panels and throw them in the bed..., thought they were stolen... ๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž

Some analysts point to low interest rates, steady job gains and the recent tax reform to justify moderate optimism, but given how quickly things can change we're not making any predictions.

@PUTC

Where I live the housing market is red hot. Anybody with a shovel, a hammer and a pickup truck is working. Let the average guy in construction make a few solid paychecks and he's gonna start wanting a new truck.

Papa Jim: Are you referring to the hurricane rebuild?
Gary Ullman's line in 5th Element comes to mind:
"Destruction breeds commerce"

Florida has had some difficult laws in the past that kept non Floridian's from bringing in out of state crews. That makes it hard for affected homeowners to find available contractor's.
Great opportunity for free agent workers to negotiate higher wages. Not so much for companies who don't establish brick & mortar operations in-state.

Here's the kicker; Hurricane repair is historically a transient industry. With the increase in size and numbers of destructive hurricanes of late it will absolutely be providing full time, off season work in the near future if not already. There will be ton's of specialized companies that do nothing but disaster work.
It also gives the insurance guy's cause to raise rates again.

Apologies. Gary Oldman.

General Motors (NYSE:GM) reported a 2017 pre-tax profit that matched its record result in 2016 and set another all-time record for earnings per share, on strong sales of high-profit trucks and SUVs.

But huge one-time charges related to the new U.S. tax law and GM's sale of Opel AG erased nearly all of that profit on a GAAP net income basis, though most of the charges were non-cash accounting adjustments.
GM has for several years carried what it calls "deferred tax assets" on its balance sheet. These are tax deductions that GM is entitled to take because of its huge losses during the last recession. Because the U.S. corporate tax rate has been cut from 35% to 21%, those deferred tax assets have lost $7.3 billion in value, and GM took that $7.3 billion as a one-time charge against its fourth-quarter earnings.

Earlier in the year, GM took a total of $6.2 billion in charges related to the sale of its German subsidiary, Opel AG, to French automaker Peugeot SA.

To sum up: One-time items decreased GM's net income by $7.3 billion in the fourth quarter and by $13.5 billion for the full year. But the key takeaway for investors is that most of that was a paper accounting adjustment. The actual impact on GM's cash was modest, and not a concern in light of GM's strong underlying earnings.
Excluding those one-time items, GM earned $6.62 per share in 2017, a record. For the fourth quarter of 2017, GM earned $1.65 per share on the same basis, trouncing Wall Street's consensus $1.38 estimate.



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