2019 Ford F-150 Raptor Sports Exclusive Traction Tech

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The 2019 Ford F-150 Raptor pickup truck, at first glance, doesn't look much different from the 2017 model. In fact, given the new grille and headlight design of the regular 2018 F-150s, the current Raptor still has the look and design of the previous-generation Ford half tons. This all seems quite odd given that the 2019 version of the off-roading pickup boasts traction technology not seen on any other pickup in the world.

Ford quietly revealed two new features — Fox Racing Shox Live Valve technology and Trail Control — on the 2019 Raptor this week. Now that we've done some more digging about these new traction systems, they could be the most under-publicized pieces of automotive technology we've seen in a long while, certainly on a pickup truck.

New Shocks Technology

The Fox Live Valve technology is basically the same suspension upgrade setup recently offered on the all-new 2018 Ford Expedition full-size SUV, which was impressive enough to win sister site Cars.com's 2018 Full-Size SUV Challenge. The Expedition uses the adaptive system to quell many of the annoying road chops and vibrations so typical on a big SUV truck-based platform. The 2019 F-150 Raptor takes this technology to the next level.

These new, active Fox Racing shocks have a dedicated computer that monitors multiple inputs all around the vehicle, such as wheel speed, steering angle, throttle position, yaw rates and more. And it's doing so every millisecond. That means that even when the pickup is airborne from an unintended (we're assuming) jump, with both the front and rear suspensions completely relaxed, it knows that each shock (especially the fronts) will need more resistance and stiffness to accommodate the impending impact. Essentially, it is predicting what's coming and does that before the wheels hit ground. It's even capable of making micro-adjustments as it monitors the truck during the impact as well.

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The Live Valve system has three internal automatic algorithm settings, each of which includes several more software settings that will adjust differently in each of the Raptor's six Terrain Management System modes: Normal, Rock Crawl, Baja, Mud/Sand, Sport and Weather.

Interestingly, unlike the Expedition, the Raptor does not offer Tow/Haul mode to allow the rear active shocks to provide load-leveling or towing benefits. From Ford's point of view, maybe that makes sense since so few Raptor owners carry anything in their bed or tow toys to the lake, snow country or desert (read heavy sarcasm here). That needs to change.

Trail Control

The second impressive upgrade to this 2019 Raptor is Trail Control. This integrated software allows the Ford to offer a type of slow-speed cruise control when combined with the active and predictive ability of the shocks. It will help the new Raptor crawl rock-strewn sluices or slippery, rutted, algae-green stream trails with confidence and more technical skill than most expert off-roaders.

The best way to understand Trail Control is to think of it as a cruise control system that takes over throttle and braking duties — usually below 10 mph, depending on the terrain setting — to allow the driver to concentrate on steering the truck toward or away from nasty obstacles. Trail Control is activated with a new button atop the center display stack (replacing the hill descent control button). It works within speed parameters of 1 to 20 mph in two-wheel drive or high range, and between 1 to 10 mph in low range.

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Once active, Trail Control will navigate the vehicle forward at the set speed until it meets an obstacle that provides resistance. It will then adjust the throttle to climb the obstacle, reading wheel travel via the electronically controlled shocks. It will also know, based on the same sensor readings, how much brake pressure to apply when descending the backside of the obstacle it just climbed. Speed slows or increases based on "perceived" terrain, eventually speeding up to the selected speed allowed by the terrain setting. The system can be automatically slowed by the driver with a touch of the brake or by tapping the steering wheel control up or down. Trail Control shares controls with the conventional cruise control system.

Improved Ride?

Both systems will be standard on all 2019 Raptors. Although we haven't driven the new truck yet — we're hoping to get behind the wheel before the end of the year — the end result is likely to be a Raptor that handles and drives better than any other F-150 or Raptor before.

We're not saying that all the Raptor's sway and body roll will be gone on the 2019 model, but with these new technologies you can expect it will drive like a completely different vehicle both on the pavement and off-road, in high and low range. In fact, it wouldn't surprise us one bit if the 2019 Ford F-150 Raptor gained popularity with people who spend most of their time on pavement instead of off.

Pricing for the 2019 Raptor is still a long way off — we're told Ford won't be making the new Raptors until late in the third quarter of this year. We'd like to see technology like this on the coming 2020 Ford Bronco SUV or a Raptor version of the 2019 Ford Ranger. We could even imagine a new Mustang with a set of shocks like these doing well on a track. More to come.

Manufacturer images

 

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Comments

that was not me !!!!!!!!!1

Yes it was!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

TNT stop being like this, we are here to bash Ford and ruin the forums. Go GM, go GM.

First off. Who is this TNT...he better not trying to impersonate me!

Second, I have stated many times that people who try to use others user names are childish

In 1999, Delphi became a fully independent company. No ties to GM.
Posted by: Harvey | May 30, 2018 8:55:24 AM

General Motors \decided to reorganize its business and sell off its non-core business lines. GM created the Automotive Components Group as a subsidiary, and later named the company Delphi Automotive Group in 1995. GM took Delphi Automotive public in 1999.

GM spent at least $12.5 billion to prop up Delphi during its bankruptcy and ended up taking back Delphi's steering business and four Delphi plants as part of the final reorganization plan. GM owned $3.8 billion in preferred shares of Delphi all the way up until early 2011.

Now TNTGMC is using my name!!!!!!!! This has to Stop!!!!!

@ TNT

Grow up whom ever u are. I have been posting on this site for over a year.
Take your childish antics someplace else.

who cares who sells more. It doesn't make it a better product...heck look at all the recalls GM has. They are number 1. And they are below average in getting recalls handled... If they would recall everything, they would blow the number one gap wide open!

Case in point. I just got back from our lake house. I pulled my 5,000 lb boat up interstate going 75 mph and got 14.9 mpg with my 3.5LTT. My 2018 6.2L got 17 mpg while pulling nothing!
The 6.2's are over rated and GM doesn't make a V6 to compete with the 3.5LTT in the half tons!! That's a fact!!!

Just like this 4 cylinder from GM. I'm a huge fan of it, I won't bash it until I see reviews and real world tests. But I can guarantee u I will buy one!

@ McFeisty

Like I said don't waste your time with the pretender Ms. Harvey, she doesn't know

Man seriously!! Stop posting under others names.....u are really upsetting me! Get a life and grow up.

U must be a Ford fan-boy bc your jealous of GM and the superiority of their V8/engines, other wise u would grow a pair of b@lls and post under your own name!!

Woman seriously!! Stop posting under others names.....u are really upsetting me! Get a wife and grow up.

U must be a GM fan-boy bc your jealous of Ford and the superiority of their V6 TT/engines, other wise I would grow a pair of b@lls and post under my own name!!

LMFAO

Anyone who has half a brain knows I would never pick a junk gerbil motor over GMs V8!!!
Sorry impersonator! You are brain dead to make a half @ss comment like that!! Jokes on u fool!

TT v6 over a 6.2L V8. Wow you are a sad individual.

LMFAO

Anyone who has half a brain knows I would not pick a junk 6.2 motor over Ford's V6TT!!!
Sorry impersonator! I'm brain dead to make a half @ss comment like that!! Jokes on me i'm a fool!

6.2L V8. over a TT v6 Wow i'm a sad individual.

TNTGMC STOP USING MY NAME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! PUTC please ban this idiot!!!!!!

Ford clowns always using other peoples names, because they know the facts don't fall in their favor. Guess that's what they got to do though to still feel like a man after buying a Ford with a lawn motor engine power it LMBO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Pretty sad that guys are so insecure about their ecoboost that they have to make fake comments using other people's names to make them feel better.

Nah, I think they're just sick of what ya'll been doing to them for years.

General Motors \decided to reorganize its business and sell off its non-core business lines. GM created the Automotive Components Group as a subsidiary, and later named the company Delphi Automotive Group in 1995. GM took Delphi Automotive public in 1999.

GM spent at least $12.5 billion to prop up Delphi during its bankruptcy and ended up taking back Delphi's steering business and four Delphi plants as part of the final reorganization plan. GM owned $3.8 billion in preferred shares of Delphi all the way up until early 2011.
Posted by: McFeisty | May 30, 2018 11:19:01 AM

Correct. GM spun off their parts division just like Ford did with Visteon in 2000. Toyota owns 24% of Denso, which was spun-off as Nippondenso Ltd back around 1949.

GM sold-off all shares it owned in Delphi back in 1999, but quickly had to invest billions in them when they began to go into bankruptcy a few years later. GM continued owning a portion of Delphi until 2011. This isn't surprising as 67% of Delphi's business was with GM. Ford makes up 80% of Visteon's business.

To try to claim that MR dampers was a BWI innovation is ridiculous. BWI didn't purchase the rights to MagneRide until 2009, 7 years after they were first used in a GM vehicle. Technology like that takes a LONG time to develop. Delphi was once a major division (Hughes) within GM and maintained strong ties with GM even after becoming "fully independent".

You can read about MagneRide and GM's involvement here:
http://www.corvetteactioncenter.com/tech/knowledgebase/article/2003-corvette-technical-article-magnetic-ride-star-wars-meets-the-50th-car-444.html

OMG. When did our butts get so important that we had to spend many thousands of bucks on shocks for an "off-road vehicle"?

@Brick: great find on the magnetic ride article. I was working at the dealership level back in 2001 and remember watching a training video about upcoming technology. I watched the actual comparison video of 2 corvettes driving over a series of bumps. The basic corvette suspension actually got airborne while the magnetic ride equipped vette ran over the same series of bumps and no tire lose contact with the pavement. It was amazing video. I just found the video on the vettes running over the bumps.

https://youtu.be/48m1_otpD9c

Nice video find. It's one thing to read about the difference it makes, it's another to see the MR shocks and standard monotubes compared side by side.

Quoted

Nahhhh...not for me... Overpriced and doesn't off road as well as a ZR2.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



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