Dana Tests Axles, Tire Inflation System at Jeep Safari

Dana 44 AdvanTEK CTIS 1 II

Each year, Moab, Utah, hosts the annual Easter Jeep Safari during which 4x4 enthusiasts get to climb some of the most beautiful and remote trails this country has to offer. For the last 10 years, Jeep has allowed its engineers to build unique concept trucks for the event, which in some cases offer clues about upcoming technology. We've even seen some pretty interesting full-size pickup trucks on the trails.

But they're not the only ones having fun and testing things in Moab.

Dana Corp., maker of driveline technologies, did some testing at the 2018 Easter Jeep Safari with several Jeep Wrangler Unlimiteds to gather real-world feedback on some new pieces we might see on a future Jeep pickup. They included a pair of heavy-duty live axles, one called the Ultimate Dana 80 and the other the Ultimate Dana 60. Both are designed for Jeep builders looking to run 40-inch or larger tires or modified Hemi or LS V-8 engines. Naturally, these axles also could inspire Ram, Ford or GM to offer some interesting special editions.

Dana also brought along a new, more compact central tire inflation system that allows the driver to raise or lower tire pressures from inside the cab with the push of a button. Some may remember this system from the military-based AM General Hummer line a few decades ago. Originally created for government and vocational applications, Dana is now looking to see if there's a market for the inflation system in the consumer arena. Being able to manually (or automatically) control settings and keep tire pressures within the optimum range could be a huge advantage for both SUVs and tow vehicles, benefiting the safety, capability and longevity of a vehicle.

For now, Dana is just studying the feasibility of these products, but they could become a reality if the company thinks there's a market for them in the popular and profitable full-size pickup market.

Manufacturer images

 

Dana CTIS 1 II

Dana CTIS 2 II

Dana CTIS 4 II

Dana CTIS 6 II

Dana 60 1 II

 

 

Comments

It would be nice to see some Dana 60's or 80's under a Ram 2500
instead of those AAM axles.

Wait, I thought Dana went bankrupt. Toyota went after them for building crappy frames and then they filed bankrupt to escape it.

@RichardNY66 - curious, what do you have against the AAM axles that any Dana product would do better?

I just remember Dana-Spicer as THE axles of the 60's,70's and
80's. They were what went into most, if not all of American made
trucks from that era. If they hit on hard times, I'm not aware of
it. Like Eaton and Rockwell, they were/are the go to axles.
Correct me if I'm wrong here. And I didn't know they made
frames as well.
I've heard iffy things about AAM units: quality control, leaky
seals bad carrier bearings, etc. All things mechanical and mass
produced have issues. Some just more then others. Hope this
helps.

Knowitall....

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/dodge/1003698-why-dodge-switch-aam-dana.html

They built the frames that rusted out on toyota. Up until they went bankrupt. Then toyota switch to someone else to build their frames. All the rusted frame recalls were from Dana. The dispute was Dana cheaped out on the rust protection because Dana were trying to save on cost. It was not physically detectable until the frame actually rusted may years later. Toyota could not recoup the loss because Dana went bankrupt. All the new frames since '10-'11+ are built from a different source now and SHOULD not have the same frame rust issues in the future.

They built the frames that rusted out on toyota. Up until they went bankrupt. Then toyota switch to someone else to build their frames. All the rusted frame recalls were from Dana. The dispute was Dana cheaped out on the rust protection because Dana were trying to save on cost. It was not physically detectable until the frame actually rusted may years later. Toyota could not recoup the loss because Dana went bankrupt. All the new frames since '10-'11+ are built from a different source now and SHOULD not have the same frame rust issues in the future.
Posted by: uh huh | May 16, 2018 2:20:05 PM


Well that was Toyota's claim. Yet somehow Toyota's auditors never detected this during one of their visits to the Dana plant. They also somehow never detected the substandard frames during routine QA inspections when the frames arrived at the assembly plant. Somehow Toyota didn't put the pieces together over the last 2 decades that maybe their frames weren't meeting their specifications.

So either Toyota is not telling the truth or they have little to no quality control with their suppliers and the parts they use in their vehicles.

I just remember Dana-Spicer as THE axles of the 60's,70's and 80's. They were what went into most, if not all of American made trucks from that era.


I've heard iffy things about AAM units: quality control, leaky
seals bad carrier bearings, etc. All things mechanical and mass produced have issues. Some just more then others. Hope this helps.
Posted by: RichardNY66 | May 16, 2018 11:27:47 AM

Funny. The 90's Dana axles fit with what you mentioned about AAM: poor quality control, cheaper seals, premature bearing failure, etc.

The US-made AAM stuff I saw had decent quality, but after the plants moved to Mexico a couple years ago, the quality became inconsistent. I've seen parts from Silao with runout that would make you cringe.

Well that was Toyota's claim. Yet somehow Toyota's auditors never detected this during one of their visits to the Dana plant. They also somehow never detected the substandard frames during routine QA inspections when the frames arrived at the assembly plant. Somehow Toyota didn't put the pieces together over the last 2 decades that maybe their frames weren't meeting their specifications.

So either Toyota is not telling the truth or they have little to no quality control with their suppliers and the parts they use in their vehicles.
Posted by: Brick | May 16, 2018 4:21:12 PM

I don't think it's easy to conclude a build quality issue on a frame fresh of the line with no rust. Rust is a timed deterioration. It's not something you can gauge right away. But I do agree, toyota should've put two and two together and say and say hey.. something is wrong. It's is just as much toyota's fault for allowing it to go this long. When the first round of rusted frame started to show up, action to change should've happen then.

@uh-oh

Accelerated weather isn’t new. Unpainted frames are routinely subjected to corrosion tests.

@ the rest...

Dana is just one axle supplier, that did supply many truck axles to Chrysler, Jeep/AMC, and Ford, but not ALL.
GM ran their design, before AAM was spun off, for a very long time. Some limited trucks had HD Dana rears and DANA front axles were normal through the late 70s.

The AAM albumin IFS stuff GM uses has a reputation for limited tolerance of big tires, torque, or abuse.
The AAM 925 in the RAM has the same torque capacity, but holds up better. In the days of GMT400 and 800s, if your 1500 had 285/75R16 or 285/79R17s (or larger) they would use that as the reason to deny front diff failures under warranty. (Ask me how I know). They tried the same on my K2500 C6P, until I pointed out the H2 used the same design IFS 925 with 315/70R17s.

And yet the 28 spline 8.5 10 bolt up front in the ranch truck is still kicking with a lunchbox locker and 35s. 34 years later.

The F-150 Eco-Boost has a different heavy duty driveline than the 5.0 engine.
All Eco-Boost F-150's have the 9" diff , heavier driveshaft, bigger u-joints.
They have too cause the extreme power and torque the Eco-Boost makes.

go ahead! get a pair of calipers and go to the Ford Dealer and crawl under the new F-150's in the lot and do the measurements yourself if you don't believe me !

The F-150 Eco-Boost is so wonderful and so much better than any other pickup out there and it's a shame if you don't own one.

@EcoBoost

The 9” hotchkiss style rear axle was discontinued after 1985 for the Salisbury style 8.8.

Current trucks with EB or the 5.0 use the Salisbury style 9.75” ring gear Visteon unit.

It isn’t just torque, but load carrying capacity in a semi-float application. At 4,800 lbs.ft of capacity, it is hardly an earth shattering unit.
By comparison, the GM-AAM 960 SF is 5,200 lbs ft.

Take a clue from the military, straight axles are old technology that they no longer trust nor want!

@oxi

Take a clue from the Military, they have dozers and they utilize portal reduction.

This military vs civilian thing is funny because many of the Military IFS/IRS trucks fail on courses a Rubicon can complete.

They aren’t about US style off-road trails, they are about our next likely combat theater.

And yet you’ve failed to bring forth any data.

Same guy who adds springs and says he increased the capacity of his Tacoma to 1 ton. Meanwhile the axle housing is deflecting, the axle shafts are running in a state of deformation, but you’ll show me.

I put magic hot sauce in my gas tank and now my truck gets 40 mpg while traveling at 80mph. Physics? Never heard of it.

@ James,

A Oshkosh MTVR has not failed anything! The U.S. Marines off-road carrying something Jeep's fail at, and that is heavy payloads while off-roading!

The United States government via her citizens trust fully independent suspension vehicles like the MTVR to increase the mobility and survival of our Marines!

Sorry, Jeeps are no longer trusted on front line battle fields because they would fail in today's modern battle field.

Today's military requires mobility and payload, something Jeep's lack!

@ James,

Again, your blatant ignorance on truck suspensions is obvious!

I will give you an example of increasing payload by simply adding a thicker load spring from the 1980's on Toyota's 1-ton small truck! I owned an 1985 Toyota 2wd pickup, and trust me, it was nothing different than the 1 ton except a thicker load half spring. Again, get an education please!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHxW0ZEf_R4

I have 10 leafs per spring on my setup that is rated 500 lbs. over stock 3 leafs, thus payload increased. It's called basic math, which you proved you failed!



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