How Does the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Drive With the 2.7-Liter?

03-1526583197792-(4) II

By Chad Kirchner

The 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 due at dealerships in the fall has more engine choices than ever before, offering six different power options for the new pickup truck. One of those new engine options is a 2.7-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gas engine. We had a chance to go behind the scenes to get all the details about the new engine and drive a 2019 Silverado equipped with it during a media event in Milford, Mich.

The 2.7-liter makes 310 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 348 pounds-feet of torque from 1,500- 4,000 rpm. That engine is mated to an updated version of GM's eight-speed automatic transmission.

The Tech Behind the Numbers

To achieve these numbers, Chevrolet developed a dual-volute turbine. Unlike a twin-scroll turbocharged, a dual-volute system sends exhaust gas into the turbine through two separate inlets, coming off the exhaust manifold. Because the gasses aren't combined before going into the turbocharger, flow is smoother and boost pressure builds faster.

An electronic boost controller keeps everything in check as the 2.7-liter builds up to 22 pounds per square inch of boost. The results are impressive. Chevrolet claims that the 2.7-liter turbo engine reaches 90 percent torque quicker than any other engine in the class. In layman's terms, turbo lag is virtually nonexistent. To reduce friction, the new engine uses a computer-controlled continuously variable oil pump. An offset crankshaft also is at play here.

The 2.7-liter is also lighter than the 4.3-liter V-6 by 80 pounds. Compared to a similar-spec 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, 380 pounds are saved overall from the V-6. A die-cast high-pressure aluminum block and lower crankcase extension saves weight. The oil pan and air-fuel module are also made of composite material.

10-2.7L-Turbo-I4 II

Engineers spent a lot of time developing three different modes for the valvetrain. A high valve lift configuration is used for full power. A low valve lift profile is used for cruising. No valve lift is employed for the active fuel management system.

The various profiles improve torque in the active fuel management mode by up to 24 percent and up to 5 in the low lift configuration. The key here is that Chevrolet is trying to make improvements across the board in normal driving situations, not just when the engine and truck is under maximum load.

Engine Cooling

An active thermal management system is employed on the 2.7-liter. An integrated exhaust manifold, electric water pump and coolant control valve allows the Chevy to control cooling independently via computer. On cold startup, the system can reduce cooling so that the engine and transmission oil warms up quicker. As the engine heats up, the system can increase cooling to maintain optimal temperature. When the engine is warmed up, the system improves combustion efficiency and exhaust cooling.

Another neat trick is that when the truck is in a stop-start situation, the system can continue to heat the cabin without the use of a secondary heating system. Yes, the 2.7-liter has stop-start, but Chevrolet does include a button to disable the system.

To help minimize vibrations from the four-cylinder engine and cylinder deactivation, Chevrolet uses a centrifugal pendulum absorber in the torque converter to smooth everything out. It's a similar setup first employed in the Chevrolet Colorado diesel.

Driving Impressions

Chevrolet emphasized that this engine was built from the ground for the new Silverado. It's a truck engine through and through. To convince auto journalists of that, Chevy invited us to drive the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado with the 2.7-liter back-to-back with a 2018 Silverado equipped with the 4.3-liter V-6. Chevrolet set up a short loop around GM's Milford Proving Grounds with different types of road conditions, so we could get a small taste of what the truck is like to live with. To make things interesting, Chevy didn't tell us that the new truck had the new engine in it. All we knew is that the engine was different, so we were shocked to learn it was new.

02-1526583197792 II

The new 2.7-liter engine is quite impressive. Acceleration is brisk and the shifts are imperceptible with the new transmission setup. All the telltale signs of a four-cylinder engine just weren't there. Driving the 2019 Silverado 1500 unloaded, it's clear why Chevy went with this engine as the base engine on the volume models. Current owners who have the V-6 are going to be blown away by the 2.7-liter. Even some 5.3-liter V-8 owners are likely to be impressed.

This setup is also light. The biggest impression from our short time behind the wheel was just how light the new truck is. The weight savings up front make the truck feel nimbler than before.

Chevy didn't provide details about suspension and chassis tuning, but you can tell shortly after you start driving that this new truck is special. Its lightness translates into a noticeable improvement in handling. Crossing over simulated railroad tracks really emphasized how much stiffer the chassis is, and how much freedom engineers had to build a lighter truck that can handle that kind of choppiness.

Compared to the 3.3-liter base engine and six-speed automatic in the 2018 Ford F-150, the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500's 2.7-liter setup is more powerful and more refined. Performance numbers for this four-cylinder inch up on the performance of Ford's 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6.

Some unknowns remain. Chevy has yet to provide towing and payload numbers for all configurations of the truck, including the new four-cylinder. We also don't know what the EPA fuel economy numbers will be, nor do we have pricing information. What we do like is when you walk into a dealership this fall to purchase a new truck, the volume models you'll see will likely have this engine.

The 5.3-liter V-8, which we also drove during the same event, remains an upgrade option. Chevrolet isn't getting rid of the V-8 anytime soon. But the new 2.7-liter in the lower trim levels isn't a penalty box for someone who doesn't want to spend a ton of money on upgrading.

We'll spend a lot more time behind the wheel as the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 gets closer to launch, including testing its the towing capability. But this early teaser has whetted our appetite.

Manufacturer images

 

01-1526583197792-(1) II

04-1526583197792-(2) II

 

Comments

for those who care, we now know the fate of the 4.3 "volume" six cylinder at GM.

Expect the 2.7 four cylinder to feel smoother than a v6 simply because fours are usually better balanced than sixes.

As the owner of a 4.8 eight cylinder Silverado, it's ironic to see the base half ton engine being replaced by a more powerful gas engine that's 2100 cc's smaller, and correspondingly lighter as well.

This GM engine will never achieve the thermal efficiency and reliability of the Toyota 2.7 liter 4-cylinder on both of my Tacoma trucks!

A Turbocharged 2.7 inline four designed specifically for truck duty is a much better choice than a V6 2.7 liter. Those larger pistons in the in line 4 will pump out plenty of smooth low end torque.

I presume Oxi buys his Kool Aid by the truckload, which is no doubt delivered to him by a long lasting, durable, dependable GM truck

Look at V8-only papajim eating words like a hotdog contest champion.

You got the smoothness comment half right, however. The main reason why this engine isn't raucous like most 4's is the that turbocharging buffers a majority noise and vibration.

It's amazing the pull of gravity Ford has on the industry, right?

This needs to go into the Colorado too. I think Ford has the right idea in the turbo 4 in the Ranger.

Sounds like an impressive little engine.

Literally YEARS behind Ford, GM is constantly chasing them like a puppy. Meanwhile Ram is doing things the right way, creating their own innovations.

It's amazing the pull of gravity Ford has on the industry, right?

Posted by: redbloodedxy | May 18, 2018 7:32:44 AM

Yes of course. Have Ford got their F-150 back into production yet?

2.7 liter turbo, that sounds familiar??

@redbloodedxy

Not sure I get your point. Back when the new Ranger was announced I applauded Ford for using the boosted 2.3

What's not consistent. I even mentioned the superiority of the new design in my comment.

Your *ss is on your shoulders again.

@redbloodedxy

Not sure I get your point. Back when the new Ranger was announced I applauded Ford for using the boosted 2.3

What's not consistent. I even mentioned the superiority of the new design in my comment.

Your *ss is on your shoulders again.

What is more amazing, you guys, pap/gms/maybe tnt complained about Fords turbos, when in actuality, this engine chevy has will be very popular just like the Fords engines are. Most of us have been saying for some time that Chevy needs to catch up to Ford. This may do it for them. I commend Chevy for finally offering some engine choices over the current boring ones. On another note, I really am warming up to the new Chevy, that red one is a sweet rig, and the turbo is a welcomed fit.....

@ Nitro

HEY, HEY, HEY...now, don't speak for me! I am not a fan of a boosted 4 in a truck! Especially a full size truck! For some people who only drive trucks now as family haulers maybe, BUT, that's not me! Also, AT-LEAST GM DIDN'T ABANDON THEIR BEST IN CLASS V8 ENGINES!!!

And their engine line-up now is far from boring! You need to ride in a 6.2L and you won't feel bored! I agree with you that the Red Jewel truck in photo is sharp looking!

Also if GM would have given the 4.3L the 8 spd it would have benefited from it greatly.

So what are the other 2 powertrain options?? A supercharged 5.3L or 6.2L in an SS model? But they need to make sure to give a "REAL" SS treatment instead of just badging.

@TNT, just sayin. I said maybe. I know alot of guys on here complain about 6's turbo'd and now they are in the chevys. I have been in the 6.2, and yes great engine, lots of power, but you loose if you dont tap the whole market. Theres a reason why they dont kill it in sales with the 6.2.....you open another door for more sales by going this route...

Nitro, please explain.

If GM wanted a 2.7 liter engine, they should have taken the LGW {3.0 twin-turbo V6} and reduced the stroke by 8.5 mm.

Opps just read other article. I now know the 6 options. I was really hoping for a supercharged big V8! Maybe 2020!!

@ Nitro

I hear what you are saying by offering more choices, but GM isn't BRAGGING up their 2.7L right now like Ford did with the Ecoboost. That's the thing that drives me crazy with Ford is that they "claim" best in class FE, towing, Ect.Ect. with 6 cylinder engines, yet we have seen that GM's v8s have beaten them in all of those statistics!
Ford didn't need to jump ship on their V8's. They have made HUGE upgrades to the 5.0L which is awesome. They should have done this earlier, like GM has with their engines, and also upgraded their own 6.2L,,, because it is a very good motor in its own right. Just needs some tweaking and it could be a power house! That's all I am saying. I am not an Ecoboost fan, have many in my family that have them. I drive them a lot and other than acceleration, they fail at everything else compared to the 5.3L I had and my new 6.2L

Drop the engine talk and take a moment to enjoy the pics of the Silverado. That is a great looking truck and if the economy holds up, it will sell very well.

Now all 6 power train combinations have been revealed, I am kind of disappointed. The other two power train combinations not mentioned here are the virtually carry over 4.3 V-6 and 5.3 V-8 with the 6 speed transmissions. I find the 4 cylinder turbo interesting, but compared to the Ford ecoboost with the same displacement, it is down 15 horsepower and 52 foot pounds of torque. So far in other applications, GM has not been successful in getting good fuel economy out of their boosted engines unlike Ford (at least according to EPA estimates). I would personally never buy the 4 cylinder anyway because I tow a lot (around 7000 pounds) and long term durability is a big concern of mine. I am still excited about the diesel, that could work for me, as could the 6.2. Still think the exterior of the new Silverado looks great, with the interior looking just ok.


Wow! This news has got to be a huge burn for all the GM fans that always rag on Ford's non-V8 Turbo engines because now they have a "big ol" I-4 in their favorite brand. Jajajajaja

On another note did everyone notice how the all the other engines in the lineup are carryovers with no power bump like everyone was so sure there would be? Come on now, the 2 V8's have basically the same power level since 2007 (12 model years ago!!!)

Texas1836...down 15 and 52...but the new GM trucks are 400 to 450lbs lighter...if talking just numbers...they will possibly be equal or a bit better...we will have to wait and see. I too think the new design looks very good...modern.

@ Texas and Fullsize

Read other article. They are not having the 6 spd anymore. They are all getting the 8 spd, except, the 6.2L and 3.0L diesel.

One 5.3L is current model, and the other is all updated! They haven't said yet if the 4.3L is updated.

Plus, as other have said, the truck is 400+ lbs lighter, and in the last shootout, The 6.2L won in all performance categories, while the 5.3L placed no less than 3rd!! Can you imagine how well they will perform now with an NFL lineman and Running back not in the trucks anymore! Awesome!

5 engines revealed and 1 more to follow. 6.2 V8, 5.3 V8, 3.0 TD, 2.7 TT I4, and 4.3 V6. What could it be? I,m betting on a boosted V6.

I read a GM press release this morning that mentioned that the 6 speed transmission will in fact carry-over for entry level 4.3 and 5.3 engines (lowest trims only). I guess that it could possibly be only for the carry over Silverado's (they will continue building the old Silverado for a while, concurrent with production of the all new 2019's) I believe that I also saw that the 4.3 will be getting DSF, so it is updated, but the power output remains the same as the current version. I just wish they could have maybe offered something more on the high end, such as a turbo 5.3 or 6.2 with DSF and possibly paired with E-assist. It will be interesting to see if the new 4 cylinder will be as efficient as the newly updated 4.3.

@TNT. Go over to TFLT as they have a chart with the 6 powertrain combos. Unless that is wrong the 5.3 with 6 speed and AFM along with the 4.3 with 6 speed are carryover. Seems strange to carryover the 5.3 from last year as an option

@ TNT

Dont know what article you read but again the gas V6 AND V8's are carryover power rating. So no change except for the new "gas saving technology" that they are forcing on you this time.

The 400lbs weight loss is for the people that get the I4, the other engine equipped (V6 & V8) trucks will likely be heavier than the equivalent previous gen truck.

@TNT. Go over to TFLT as they have a chart with the 6 powertrain combos. Unless that is wrong the 5.3 with 6 speed and AFM along with the 4.3 with 6 speed are carryover. Seems strange to carryover the 5.3 from last year as an option


Posted by: Smokin’ a 6.2 | May 18, 2018 9:48:05 AM

That's just a little marketing fluff by GM. The carry over engines will be offered in the classic style as they will still be produced along with the all new body styles.

@fullsize. Yes power ratings carried over. The 5.3 from last year csrries overwith the 6 speed and the new 5.3 with DFM is offered with the 8 speed. Those count as 2 of the 6 powertrain combos. The 4.3 carries over from what I can tell with the 6 speed only

@gmsrgreat. Wrong. The old body styles will not carryover like RAM is doing. The old 5.3 with 6 speed and AFM will be offered in the 2019 WT, Custom, an Custom Trail Boss. The carryover 4.3 will also be standard in those trims

The 400lbs weight loss is for the people that get the I4, the other engine equipped (V6 & V8) trucks will likely be heavier than the equivalent previous gen truck.

Posted by: FullSize_only | May 18, 2018 9:49:46 AM

I believe GM marketing said that the new generation of truck will be up to 400 lbs lighter. This i4 engine is 80 lbs lighter than the 4.3 V6. A V8 engine is probably no more than 50 lbs heavier than the 4.3 V6. With all that said, a new model V8 powered truck will probably be 250-280 lbs lighter than the classic style.

@ GMS

Ya just read motor trend and the carryover 4.3L and 5.3L will have 6 spd in the work trucks. My bad, I swore the other article here on PUT stated that they all were getting 8 spds except diesel and 6.2L

I don't alike that. Just have the 8 Spd across the board. 10 spd for the 2 higher end engines.

Still think GM should have bumped numbers by 20 HP...I know they are losing a ton of weight but their is still room for increases!

If you read the article about the cylinder deactivation, Its states that everything else gets the 8 speed. My bad, I thought that meant all engines! But other cites like motor trend, TFL, and Car and driver are stating Work trucks get 6 spds
Interesting!

@ TNT. I thought interesting as well. My guess is those trucks will have a lower ATP and GM may be trying to improve the ROS on those trim levels.

@gmsrgreat. Wrong. The old body styles will not carryover like RAM is doing. The old 5.3 with 6 speed and AFM will be offered in the 2019 WT, Custom, an Custom Trail Boss. The carryover 4.3 will also be standard in those trims


Posted by: Smokin’ a 6.2 | May 18, 2018 10:05:49 AM

You are correct with the new body style drivetrain offerings. However, I am sure that I read the classic body style will continue for some time in fleet sales. I'll update if I find that info.

Nah, no way, it's going to hold up.

I hope this goes in to the Colorado, would love to have this in a ZR2...instead of the 3.6 that is in mine

And people were whining about the 2.7 and 3.5L Ecoboost engines in the Ford F150, which are V6s. Now you got something that will really sound like a sewing machine!

Rant aside, I will withhold judgment until I see real-world test results. The 5.3 with the AFM or cylinder deactivation method shuts off cylinders when not needed so I will see how the four-banger will operate under full duress.

I have never actually seen GM release specs on the 5.3 and 6.2 for 2019.

Could someone provide a link that we have actually seen a GM release with power numbers on the v8's.

I believe they are being silent on that as of yet....

And people were whining about the 2.7 and 3.5L Ecoboost engines in the Ford F150, which are V6s. Now you got something that will really sound like a sewing machine!


Posted by: Liam | May 18, 2018 11:10:29 AM

People were "whining" about 3.5 and 2.7 Ecoboosts because of poor reliability, not sewing machine noise. Although the exhaust note of the ecoboosts are absolutely awful.

----------
Ya just read motor trend and the carryover 4.3L and 5.3L will have 6 spd in the work trucks. My bad, I swore the other article here on PUT stated that they all were getting 8 spds except diesel and 6.2L

I don't alike that. Just have the 8 Spd across the board. 10 spd for the 2 higher end engines.

Posted by: TNTGMC | May 18, 2018 10:12:42 AM

GM is smart carrying over the 6L80. It's a proven transmission and would probably be the preferred choice for fleet customers.

@brick

People weren't whining about poor reliability when the Ford 3.5 and 2.7 V6's came out since Ford had just introduced them. There were however plenty of GM fans ridiculing Ford for embracing new tech and putting a turbo V6 in a truck and now those same people have a I-4 in their favorite brand. What do all those GM guys who looked down on Ford turbo V6 engines have to say about that???

@brick

People weren't whining about poor reliability when the Ford 3.5 and 2.7 V6's came out since Ford had just introduced them. There were however plenty of GM fans ridiculing Ford for embracing new tech and putting a turbo V6 in a truck and now those same people have a I-4 in their favorite brand. What do all those GM guys who looked down on Ford turbo V6 engines have to say about that???


Posted by: FullSize_only | May 18, 2018 12:10:04 PM

////

The difference is the ecoboost was a car engine fitted to trucks. That alone has the potential for issues in reliability right out if the gate based on potential duty cycle.

Ford already had enough junk truck motors in the pipe with the 5.4 issues, so most people were pessimistic.

Turns out they were right with the first few years of ecoboost. Lits of problem...

GM has not been successful in getting good fuel economy out of their boosted engines unlike Ford (at least according to EPA estimates). I would personally never buy the 4 cylinder anyway because I tow a lot (around 7000 pounds) and long term durability is a big concern of mine. I am still excited about the diesel, that could work for me, as could the 6.2. Still think the exterior of the new Silverado looks great, with the interior looking just ok.


Posted by: Texas1836 | May 18, 2018 9:05:00 AM

Huh? Car and Driver just had an article out this month. The 2.3 Ecoboost delivered 23% worse fuel economy than its EPA rating. 2011-14 F-150 Ecoboost was widely criticized for its worse than EPA rated fuel economy. The 2015+ F-150 Ecoboost trucks did not deliver exceptional fuel economy. Most of the fuel economy improvement was due to the fact that the trucks were up to 800 lbs lighter. In the 2016 Texas Truck Showdown, the 2016 F-150 3.5 EB delivered worse fuel economy than the 5.3 and 6.2 while empty, and worse fuel economy than the 6.2 while towing 10,000 lbs. Any turbo gas engine will get good fuel economy when the truck is empty and you're out of the boost. When your hauling, towing, or just driving the truck hard, that fuel economy is out the window. Manufacturers are going to turbo gas engines because they make it easier to score well during EPA fuel economy testing. In the real world, engines like the 3.5 EB guzzle gas like a big V8.

------------------------------
Dont know what article you read but again the gas V6 AND V8's are carryover power rating. So no change except for the new "gas saving technology" that they are forcing on you this time.

Posted by: FullSize_only | May 18, 2018 9:49:46 AM

Forcing on you? Deactivating AFM has been TRIVIAL for years. You can shift to M instead of D and select the first overdrive (5th gear for the 6 speed, 7th gear on the 8 speed) and AFM is disabled completely. Range Technologies sells a device that disables AFM without avoiding your warranty. Then there are several tuning options for turning it off including EFI Live, HP Tuners, and the dozen different handheld tuners. There are plenty of AFM delete kits that block the AFM solenoids and replaces the AFM lifters.

------------------
The 400lbs weight loss is for the people that get the I4, the other engine equipped (V6 & V8) trucks will likely be heavier than the equivalent previous gen truck.


Posted by: FullSize_only | May 18, 2018 9:49:46 AM

ALL of the 2019 trucks are 450 lbs lighter due to the aluminum doors, hood, and tailgate, plus the bed is 500 mpa high strength steel, allowing it to be lighter. GM released that information way back in January.

The 2.7 I4 is 80 lbs lighter than the 4.3 V6.

And people were whining about the 2.7 and 3.5L Ecoboost engines in the Ford F150, which are V6s. Now you got something that will really sound like a sewing machine!

Posted by: Liam | May 18, 2018 11:10:29 AM

The v6 eco boost sounds like 1.5 sewing machines.

People weren't whining about poor reliability when the Ford 3.5 and 2.7 V6's came out since Ford had just introduced them. There were however plenty of GM fans ridiculing Ford for embracing new tech and putting a turbo V6 in a truck and now those same people have a I-4 in their favorite brand. What do all those GM guys who looked down on Ford turbo V6 engines have to say about that???

Posted by: FullSize_only | May 18, 2018 12:10:04 PM


When the F-150 first got the 3.5 Ecoboost in 2011, it was already having reliability issues in the Taurus SHO. Flex, and Lincoln MKS/MKT. The major problems carried over to the F-150 and continued on for years.

The 2.7 Ecoboost also inherited the cam phaser/timing chain issues, including the same stretch-prone inverted tooth timing chain that caused years of problems for the 3.5EB.

@gmsrgreat. Wrong. The old body styles will not carryover like RAM is doing. The old 5.3 with 6 speed and AFM will be offered in the 2019 WT, Custom, an Custom Trail Boss. The carryover 4.3 will also be standard in those trims

Posted by: Smokin’ a 6.2 | May 18, 2018 10:05:49 AM

You are correct with the new body style drivetrain offerings. However, I am sure that I read the classic body style will continue for some time in fleet sales. I'll update if I find that info.

Posted by: GMSRGREAT | May 18, 2018 10:37:11 AM

https://www.topspeed.com/cars/car-news/gm-will-continue-current-silverado-sierra-production-past-2019-model-launch-ar178953.html

Brick,

All brands have and will continue to have "junk truck motors in the pipe" just like the all the people that had and still have their 5.3L burning excessive oil issues.

Yeah it's what comes with the vehicle no? If you have to buy aftermarket parts or swap internal engine components to remove it then yeah I would say they are forcing it on you.

So you are saying that all possible cab/engine configurations from a single can V6 2wd to a crew cab V8 4wd are losing 450lbs?? Umm no.

I’ve never seen a 4-door 4.3 V6 in any Chevrolet dealerships where I live, and I don’t know if many of these 4 cylinders will find their way to our dealerships either. For several years after they came out, the local Ford dealerships didn’t stock any ecoboost engines either, just the 5.0 V8.

@ Fullsize

Some of the early 5.3L did have oil consumption problems, those issues have been addressed. I'd rather burn oil and still make it home instead of throwing a timing chain and get towed home? Correct? Or maybe you prefer riding shotgun in a tow truck?

I'm not going to sit here and bash Ford vs Chevy, we have done this. But GM stated that this is a truck motor, built from ground up to be used in a TRUCK.
Ford did not do this with the Ecoboost. They had it in cars/SUV's first. There is a big difference.

Again, I am not a fan of smaller engines in a truck. I prefer the bigger 5.3L or of course 6.2L!!

@gmsrgreat. Interesting find on that article. I had not heard any talk about that and am surprised that GM has not issued a formal statement. Seems strange to continue the 18 body and offer the new with the old powertrain in WT trim. Strange

It may be harder to deactivate this version of AFM since a 3rd party (Tula) developed and owns the proprietary software. 66,000 lines of code just for skip fire and a 12.5 ms rate of change - wonder how they get the mechanicals to keep up? Oil pressure is used so there must be super fast solenoid valve(s).



Post a Comment

Please remember a few rules before posting comments:

  • Try to be civil to your fellow blog readers.
  • Stay on topic. We want to hear your opinions and thoughts, but please only comment about the specified topic in the blog post.
  • Your email will not be shown.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In

Home | Buy or Sell a Truck | News | Special Reports

Powered by Cars.com. By using this site, you agree to our terms of service | © 2017 Cars.com | Privacy Statement | Contact Us