Spray-On Products Can Protect Entire Truck

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Bed protection is an important issue that every pickup truck owner needs to consider. Nowadays, it seems like every truckmaker offers a spray-in bedliner option, but there are dealers that offer the less expensive drop-in bedliner option. In our opinion, a good-quality spray-in bedliner provides the best way to protect your truck bed from damaging scratches that could lead to rusting or metal fatigue while also providing nonslip grip for your load.

Line-X is one of several companies that make sprays that protect all types of trucks and trailers that see harsh duty. Line-X offers a full line of products — from economical to pricey — for people who want to protect their two-wheel and four-wheel investments, providing spray-on protection for toy haulers, boats, motorcycles and vehicle accessories such as roof racks, aftermarket bumpers, light bars and grille guards.

We recently had the chance to get up close with Line-X's recent Ford F-150 Raptor project for which the company showcased its spray-on technology for the outer skin of a truck instead of just the bed. The Ford Raptor pictured here is fully covered with Line-X's Ultra line of textured spray that can be pigmented to any color you want. This Raptor sports some custom extra-wide front and rear fenders, giving the beast more drama with a wide-mouth stance. The custom-made front and rear prototype bumpers add to its menace. We thought the little project looked pretty cool, so we took it out for a quick photo shoot and offer this photo gallery.

Cars.com photos by Mark Williams

 

Raptor 5 II

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Comments

That truck looks awesome. NICE!!! Thanks FORD for the F150 and RAPTOR and all the FORD TRUCKS AND THE RANGER.

NOT LIKE THE CHEVYOTA TUNDERADO WANNA BE FORD AND TOYOTA.

Terrible idea.

How much weight does the bedliner add, and how much drag does the texture cause resulting in lower economy? Maybe it's necessary to protect those flimsy aluminum panels, nevermind all the extra weight negating the only advantage of aluminum over steel. Also good luck when you need bodywork, just leave your wallet at the bodyshop if you want it matched correctly.

I can see a rockcrawer being coated in bedliner but that's a totally different application. Not much drag at low speed and nobody builds them for economy.

Also you may find spray on liners better to haul around your tampon boxes and tandem bike but having had both a sprayed liner and drop in bedliner (both factory) I prefer the drop in. It's in far better condition after ten years of daily use hauling building materials and tools and I prefer being able to slide things in and out. Maybe you should consider using drop-in panels to cover the flimsy aluminum body panels on the raptor, wouldn't that be something.

Terrible idea.

How much weight does the bedliner add, and how much drag does the texture cause resulting in lower economy? Maybe it's necessary to protect those flimsy aluminum panels, nevermind all the extra weight negating the only advantage of aluminum over steel. Also good luck when you need bodywork, just leave your wallet at the bodyshop if you want it matched correctly.

I can see a rockcrawer being coated in bedliner but that's a totally different application. Not much drag at low speed and nobody builds them for economy.

Also you may find spray on liners better to haul around your Kleenex boxes and unicycle but having had both a sprayed liner and drop in bedliner (both factory) I prefer the drop in. It's in far better condition after ten years of daily use hauling building materials and tools and I prefer being able to slide things in and out. Maybe you should consider using drop-in panels to cover the flimsy aluminum body panels on the raptor, wouldn't that be something.

Terrible idea.

How much weight does the bedliner add, and how much drag does the texture cause resulting in lower economy? Maybe it's necessary to protect those aluminum panels, nevermind all the extra weight negating the only advantage of aluminum over steel. Also good luck when you need bodywork, just leave your wallet at the bodyshop if you want it matched correctly.

I can see a rockcrawer being coated in bedliner but that's a totally different application. Not much drag at low speed and nobody builds them for economy.

Also you may find spray on liners better to haul around your tampon boxes and tandem bike but having had both a sprayed liner and drop in bedliner (both factory) I prefer the drop in. It's in far better condition after ten years of daily use hauling building materials and tools and I prefer being able to slide things in and out. Maybe you should consider using drop-in panels to cover the thin aluminum body panels on the raptor, wouldn't that be something.

Does this mean they WILL (obviously they are able) spray the bedliner in whatever color you ask? I'd love to see keymatched bedliners!

I also share concerns regarding weight. Would love to see comparisons to traditional paint and wraps.

@DB

re: Weight---do you realize that the optimum thickness for the spray-on would potentially be a lot thinner (read: Lighter) than the surface of a truck bed that has to endure a ton of punishment in normal applications?

re: Aero---evidently you presume that all driving is done at speeds where aero considerations even come into play. At speeds below fifty mph aero is a non factor.

err, make that BD!

This is all a waste of money.
You would have to take the body off and completely seal it with this stuff underneath to prevent all the wear and rust.
So spraying it just on the outer fenders and hood is a joke.

Like the color and stripes

You would have to take the body off and completely seal it with this stuff underneath to prevent all the wear and rust.
So spraying it just on the outer fenders and hood is a joke.
Posted by: Jack | May 1, 2018

@Jack

You might have seen more body shops than me during the last 60 years, but I've never seen the typically body/paint shop completely remove the body from the frame for a standard paint job or collision repair.

A custom paint job, sometimes. Routine? No.

Chingon on drugs again. Should stay off them for once so your head gets clear of all the crap you keep spitting out

Chingon on drugs again. Should stay off them for once so your head gets clear of all the crap you keep spitting out

Pete

I agree ! he is making me look bad as the chief cheerleader of the F-150 Eco-Boost.
Not only are my comments some of the best, my comments are creative and honest.
I mean if you're going to type something with no substance it's just a waste of time.
I always look for the the better comments here and enjoy reading them and I will call out and respond to the better and informative comments with my highest respect.

I have Line-X professionally done in all the beds of my trucks including interior walls/floor of my jeep wrangler...if you can afford it, it's one of the best investments you can add to protect your vehicle; they look great plus & easier to hose down/clean-ups after a day out with family hauling all kinds of crap/BBQ & all the mud-dirt-sand that comes with it......

Not a fan of Bedliner other then in the Bed.

@japapim, I mean papajim, so what's the additional weight? Is it worth it for the 99.99% of road use these see? And that's still just one factor. I'm still curious how a textured coating vehicle is effected by friction and, if so, what percentage drop in fuel economy there is... and again is it worth it for a truck that is driven on the road most of the time.

My plumber likes this because "stuff doesn't slide around on it".

That's the reason I like slippery drop-in type. It's easier to load/unload. As for loads in transit; I use bungee cords and bed dividers.

@BD

aero is not a concern when the truck is not moving, or is traveling at moderate speeds. Not a factor.

Aero becomes a big factor at speeds above 70mph but even then you'd have to do a comparison to even be concerned about it. If it only costs you 2 mpg, do you really care?

@BD - I do see the occasional work truck and offroader with bedline sprayed onto the body. I doubt that parasitic drag is a big issue for most buyers. A change to an aggressive tire will drop MPG more than spray-on line slathered all over the exterior.

I love those bumpers. They fit the lines of the truck very well.

Weight is a serious consideration. Especially with so much bedliner coating used and so much higher up on the vehicle.

I personally would love to coat the rocker panels, bumpers, nerfbars/steps and lower body portions with bedliner but don't see the return going higher (even with roof racks).

On an aluminum Ford there is no consider for using this for anti corrosion purposes. The military has found that this stuff does add significantly to the strength of whatever it is applied to to resist denting, bending, puncture which is very advantageous to all trucks and especially aluminum panels/parts.

I just use a regular rubber bed mat. Stuff won't slide but I'll probably order a spray in when I buy new again.

I typical bedliner adds approx. 45 lbs. to the truck. I've been told this material, LINE-X Ultra is sprayed much thinner, hence less weight. The coating probably adds a total of 150-200 lbs to the truck.



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