Sibling Rivalry: 2018 Toyota Tundra Vs. 2018 Toyota Tacoma

01-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-angle--exterior--front--grey--red copy

Among the first choices that many prospective pickup truck buyers face is how big to go. Will a mid-size pickup, with its smaller footprint and better fuel economy be enough to get the job done? Or do they want something will full-size capability but aren't sure that they'll be able to park it?

The most immediate difference between a full-size and mid-size pickup is obvious: a significant gap in size. But we wanted to take a more nuanced look at just how much performance variation there is with day-to-day tasks. With that in mind, Pickuptrucks.com Editor Mark Williams and I headed to the Pacific Northwest to test the mid-size 2018 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off-Road double cab and full-size 2018 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax.

One reason we chose these two is the Tundra's age; it hasn't received a full redesign since the 2007 model year, though it got a significant update in 2014. Contrast that with the Tacoma, which got a full redesign for the 2016 model year, making the mid-size truck larger and more expensive. Our two contenders for this head-to-head had some overlap in terms of features: They had the same Entune Premium multimedia system and matching 7-inch screens, the standard Toyota Safety Sense suite of active safety features and similar bed sizes. However, they had plenty of differences worth noting.

For a closer look at their specifications, check out the chart below.

Challenge_WYG_18Tundra-v-18Tacoma-560px

In the name of full disclosure, we should note that just before we started this test in Seattle, we fell victim to a commuter-traffic rear-ender. You might notice in some of the photos there is damage to the passenger-side rear bumper of the Tacoma, where we lost the color-matched covering and some parking sensors. Thankfully, no one was hurt and, even more importantly, the Tacoma was more than ready and able to jump into our full schedule of contests.

Seattle offered a nearly ideal mix of urban and rural driving with access to city streets and forest trails for putting these trucks through their paces. We even drove the Tacoma through its namesake city at one point. We came up with nine key categories to see how they stack up:

Drivability

07-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-angle--dynamic--exterior--front--grey--red copy II

Although many factors were at play here (tires, shocks, weight, etc.), the combination of a longer wheelbase and street tires made the Tundra ride better on pavement; it soaked up road imperfections better and had a quieter cabin on the highway — the only exception being when you tip into the throttle, which yields a satisfying sound.

Contrast that to the busy ride of the Tacoma with its off-road-biased monotube shocks and it wasn't much of a contest. The truck chatters at low and high speeds, and there's more road and wind noise to boot. Less off-road-oriented trims of the Tacoma likely would provide a better ride, but there would be a trade-off in capability.

Another notable distinction between the two is how the steering wheels feel. The Tundra's setup is well-boosted with low effort, while the Tacoma's has a heavier, stiffer feel without much change at slow speeds, which could make tighter maneuvers like parking a little tougher.

Acceleration

05-toyota-tundra-2018-angle--dynamic--exterior--front--red copy

No surprises here; the Toyota Tundra's V-8 feels more powerful than the Toyota Tacoma's V-6. But there are still some important points to remember here, whether you're choosing a daily driver or weekly worker.

The Tundra's old-school formula of a big V-8 with strong torque numbers and a no-frills six-speed automatic transmission paid big dividends in terms of acceleration. The 5.7-liter V-8 offered even and strong power delivery, combining with the transmission to deliver a responsive driving experience at both low and high speeds.

Our experience in the V-6 Tacoma was not as positive. It also had a six-speed automatic transmission, but it was paired to a 3.5-liter V-6 that runs on what Toyota calls a "simulated Atkinson cycle" that makes it more efficient in certain load situations. This engine seemed to struggle with power delivery due to its focus on efficiency. If you need extra power, we strongly recommend finding and using the ECT (sort of a Sport mode) button to change the sometimes sluggish engine feel.

Visibility

51-toyota-tacoma-2018-center-stack-display--interior copy II

With rare exceptions, a half-ton pickup will be taller and larger than its mid-size counterpart. In this case, the taller Tundra offers greater forward and rearward visibility with its large windows. The views feel more expansive all around and it has a larger set of sideview mirrors, which are crucial on a large truck that rides high and could tow a trailer.

The Tacoma isn't bad in this department, but it falls victim to its size. With that said, front visibility over the hood and to each corner give it a huge advantage, but we found bigger blind spots over the shoulder, through the rearview mirror and out the smaller rear window. Still, the Tacoma's smaller size and the ability to more easily see to almost every corner of the truck would certainly help in tighter urban settings and city parking situations.

Cabin

16-toyota-tundra-2018-cockpit-shot--front-row--interior copy II

There is a 16.6-inch difference in the overall length between the two Toyota pickups, but only 6.2 inches of that comes from the bed — meaning much of the rest is found in the cabin. This is where the Tundra flexes its biggest advantage: In CrewMax guise it has the largest passenger volume of any full-size pickup and the space there is expansive. The Tundra has 42.3 inches of rear legroom, which is nearly 10 inches more than the Tacoma's 32.6 inches.

The Tundra's backseat area is gigantic, with legroom and headroom that rivals anything you can find in a luxury sedan or SUV. The Tundra's backseat cushion bottoms fold to provide a large cargo area for securing valuable gear; additionally, the rear door opening measures almost 41 inches tall by 26 inches wide. In comparison, the Tacoma has a much smaller opening at almost 36 by 18 inches, with its seat bottom folding forward instead of up for much less storage area.

Where the Tacoma strikes back is with more tech features and higher-quality materials (leather seats instead of cloth), a more modern design and luxuries like heated front seats, dual-zone automatic climate control and an Entune Premium JBL audio system.

It boils down to this: If you're going to have regular backseat passengers, cabin space and storage should be a priority. That's where the Tundra is going to win for you. If you don't need that kind of room, take the extra features you'll get in the smaller Tacoma.

Parking

50-toyota-tacoma-2018-exterior--grey copy II

When it comes to parking, size matters. However, because of how our two Toyotas were equipped, we didn't find much of a difference between parking the two trucks. Obviously, there are spaces the Tacoma will fit into that the Tundra won't. That's undeniable. But they both can be easily parked in roughly the same size space.

Though both came with parking sensors, the Tacoma offered sensors just in the rear whereas the Tundra had sensors on both the front and rear bumpers with visual and audible warnings.

We conducted our parallel parking test in downtown Seattle on a fairly busy street. I didn't feel any less at ease than parking the larger truck than the smaller one. That is in part due to the Tundra's quick-turning steering wheel, which is easier to turn than the stiffer steering wheel found on the Tacoma. It had so much weight that it took two hands to turn quickly.

Garagability

54-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-exterior--front--grey--red copy II

Besides parking the trucks on the streets and in parking lots in Seattle, we also tested how the two trucks fit into a normal suburban garage. As you might expect, this is where the Tundra's size worked against it, more so than in the other parking scenarios.

Here, the photos tell the tale.

The Tundra's 16 extra inches of length were at play here. No matter which side of the garage we parked it on, it partially or completely blocked the door to the house or storage closets built into the garage.

With the shorter and narrower Tacoma in either slot, there was plenty of room to maneuver around the truck on either side as well in front and behind. As to ceiling height, the lowest point of the garage was 76.5 inches — directly underneath one of the motors for the garage door — that made for some nervous moments in the Tundra with its 76.2-inch roof height. But it fit in both sides of the garage nonetheless.

The point here (and probably everywhere else) is if you are choosing between these two pickup sizes, consider everywhere you'll drive and park your pickup. Check to see if you will still have access to all the important doors and equipment stored in your garage.

Fuel Economy

03-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-exterior--grey--red copy II

We drove two fuel economy loops around the Seattle area to see how the two sizes compared, mixing highway and city driving with a few hours of commuter traffic for good measure (the things we do for you, dear readers). The first loop was performed empty, the second one loaded to near each vehicle's maximum payload figure. That came out to 1,200 pounds for the Tundra and 900 pounds for the Tacoma. We switched seats throughout the loops to account for differences in driving style, and the pickups were filled at the same pump, at the same time, by the same person at the start and the end of the loop. Here are the results:

Tundra

  • EPA estimates: 13/17/14 mpg city/highway/combined
  • Calculated, empty (5,940 pounds): 17.4 mpg combined
  • Calculated, loaded (7,140 pounds): 13.8 mpg combined

Tacoma

  • EPA estimates: 18/22/20 mpg city/highway/combined
  • Calculated, empty (4,600 pounds): 20.8 mpg combined
  • Calculated, loaded (5,500 pounds): 17.4 mpg combined

The Tundra outperformed its EPA highway fuel economy rating on our unloaded loop, while the Tacoma got closer to its EPA-estimated combined mpg figure. The two trucks had similar gaps in both the empty and loaded tests, with the Tacoma having a 3.4 mpg advantage in the unloaded test and a 3.6 mpg advantage with a full load.

Payload

63-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-cargo--exterior--grey--rear--red copy II

The engine doldrums that we noticed during acceleration in the Tacoma were exacerbated with a bed full of cement bags. The Tundra, however, handled it with aplomb with the flip of the Tow/Haul switch on the dash, allowing the transmission to hold gears up and down longer. If you plan on hauling heavier loads, there's nothing that compares to strong V-8 power.

The Tacoma? We used ECT power mode for towing, but it didn't have quite the same effect as a Tow/Haul mode. The Tacoma's V-6 worked hard with the extra weight in the bed and felt much less confident off the line and around corners, especially going up steep hills in downtown Seattle. However, having a hand brake near the driver's right hand was a huge advantage when stopped at a red light on a steep incline.

Both trucks handled the added weight pretty well from a ride-quality perspective, though the Tundra appeared to have more dip in its bed with its maximum payload. The springs didn't appear to be overwhelmed and we didn't feel any worrisome motions. The Tundra felt like it could handle more if needed, but the Tacoma was at its limits.

Off-Roading

68-toyota-tacoma-2018-dynamic--exterior--grey--off-road--profile copy II

The off-road portion of our testing was where the Tacoma shined; it was the more natural truck on the small off-road loop we ran in the Tahuya State Forest. Many of the smaller pickup comes with decent off-road packages; our Tacoma was the stout TRD Off-Road trim, which included aggressive tires, Crawl Control, Multi-Terrain Select, a locking rear differential, extra skid plating and impressive articulation.

Whether using Crawl Control or doing things the old-fashioned way, the Tacoma was the much better tool on the loose, off-camber surfaces. Additionally, since we were running in low range much of the time, the earlier complaints about the V-6 engine performance simply went away.

While the Tundra ran the same off-road course, it was clearly less at home and pushed closer to its limits — although it was impressive on the course. The Tundra's size worked against it and the light steering we welcomed in the city was less of an advantage on the trail where we wanted feedback. Also, it lacked the amount of articulation found in the Tacoma and required more preparation before every obstacle.

Conclusion

IMG_3416 copy

This full-size versus mid-size comparison test reinforced some assumptions and offered a few surprises.

Size can be both an advantage and disadvantage. If you need to park your truck in the garage, it may not fit; however, if you need more payload or you tow a trailer, the bigger truck will pay dividends.

Conversely, if you don't need as much capability, the Tacoma offers you more truck overall. Going smaller for a bit less money — our Tundra cost $45,168 and the Tacoma $41,367, including destination fees — nets a ton of off-road capability, but if you don't need that, jump down a trim level and save even more. I would be OK putting friends in the backseat of the Tundra for hours, but in the Tacoma that time window shrinks to much shorter trips.

We didn't get a chance to test towing, but it's still worth mentioning that the Tundra's higher gross vehicle weight rating and more powerful V-8 engine will help deliver a more confident towing experience. As equipped, our half-ton Tundra had a max tow rating of 9,800 pounds, while our mid-size Tacoma had a max tow rating of 6,400 pounds. And we're guessing, as with payload, the Tundra will offer the more confident ride at or close to its max numbers while the Tacoma will be pushing it.

As you'll see in our head-to-head video, we had the requisite "which one would you take home?" conversation. And despite being the one who lives in the city, I'd choose the larger Tundra. Williams, on the other hand, chose the Tacoma even though he lives in the suburbs and has a garage big enough to handle both. I preferred the Tundra's spacious cabin and powerful performance. Williams found the Tacoma's off-road capability and value in regard to features too hard to pass up. Of course, we agree there's a lot to consider when choosing between these two pickup sizes.

Cars.com photos by Christian Lantry

 

64-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-cargo--exterior--grey--rear--red copy II

31-toyota-tacoma-2018-exterior--grey--profile copy II

12-toyota-tacoma-2018-engine--interior copy II

32-toyota-tacoma-2018-front-row--interior--wide copy II

48-toyota-tacoma-2018-backseat--interior copy II

93-toyota-tacoma-2018-cargo--exterior--grey copy II

13-toyota-tundra-2018-exterior--profile--red copy

09-toyota-tundra-2018-engine--interior copy II

14-toyota-tundra-2018-front-row--interior--wide copy

29-toyota-tundra-2018-backseat--interior copy II

86-toyota-tundra-2018-exterior--red copy II

65-toyota-tacoma-tundra-2018-cargo--exterior--grey--rear-angle--red copyA II

 

Comments

Considering the small difference in prices (as equipped here) there is no contest. You'd have to be a complete nut to choose the Tacoma. The Tundra despite its advance age remains a good truck in many ways.

The Tacoma's so called improvements a few years ago (3.5 engine for example) result in a truck that is panned universally by reviewers.

Who would do that?

The payload what a joke, those trucks can haul 3 or 4 times that much weight no problem. Who tf comes up these numbers

Standard Garage 235" length
Tundra in article 228.9"
Tacoma in article 212.3"
Tacoma Long Bed 225.5"

Judging from production numbers there is no rivalry as Toyota prefers the Tacoma.

Tacoma makes a lot of sense for a light duty weekend project pickup who’s owner works in a profession that is set in an office setting. Will fit in a parking garage in an urban area without worry of height restrictions. When I had my ’12 RAM 2500 and had to visit a client in the biotech area of Cambridge, MA; most of the parking garages had height and length restrictions which prevented me from parking anywhere near the builds. Don’t want to miss the start of a client meeting based on parking issues.

Awesome trucks, much nicer than papajim and the gm look alikes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It wont work imposter

Toyota has always had reliability behind them. The Tundra is a great truck. My cousin went through 3 of them. They just don't get any FE what so ever, from his perspective. The best he got with it was his 2010 and he said 16 at best. Tons of power though!
I drove his 13 limited to get tinted at friends shop and it had plenty of that!
The Tacoma is still a good truck, not as great as its predecessor! It needs more power and a new face-lift! But its still a very reliable truck.

The author makes a number of valid points between the two sizes of truck; it really does depend on personal needs and desires as to which is better for you--despite the similarity in pricing before/after incentives. It would behoove us all to keep this in mind if/when Ford actually does bring out an even smaller truck, as they've suggested.

The name says it for both,
"TOY"ota

And-d-d, the Toyotas don't vibra-a-a-te and sh-sh-shake when you drive them.

Those prices are similar because they chose a well loaded tacoma to a basic SR5 tundra. An equally loaded tundra would be 50k. Regardless, there's no doubt a fullsize will always perform duty better than a midsize. We already know the tundra can handle more than what's written on paper. It's Ford that puts more in the paper than it can in real life.

And-d-d, the Toyotas don't vibra-a-a-te and sh-sh-shake when you drive them.
Posted by: redbloodedxy | Aug 27, 2018 3:36:27 PM


Well the Tundra has had quite a few complaints of vibration (2-piece driveshaft vibration and front diff vibration), it was just nowhere near as bad as the wobblin gobblin aka the Ford Superduty you are talking about. Those trucks death wobble by 10k miles and Ford tells you the truck wasn't designed to go over 65 MPH. Some shake so bad you'd think the truck was about to throw itself into the ditch. Even the 2018 F-350 that PUTC tested was showing signs that it wanted to start death wobbling when it hit expansion joints.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpxfZkujLhU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeJO1QZKj9w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgpITguczYM

So much for all those guys claiming that Ford "fixed" the death wobble issues that the 1st gen Superduty constantly had. The 2017+ trucks are WORSE.

@nitro

Yep my friend's new 2017 F-250 did the same thing. Ford told him the DW was "fixed" twice now. 15k miles on it. Started doing it at 6k miles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6YKTf7cm-o
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXlvYKslRus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS-qQ0D8frA

Less than a year old:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyjWAeSl5R4

I feel bad for the guys that bought these trucks. Ford knows about the problems with their geometry and alignment spec, but they'd rather push the alignment for max turning radius and cut money out of the setup even though they should know what's going to happen. SFA trucks and SUV's have always had DW problems but they shouldn't be happening at such a low mileage.

I wish I had bought a new Tundra instead of buying the new Ram.

-CT

It's a tough call between the two trucks. I can't stand the weak 3.5 V6 - the powerband is weird, the torque just isn't there, and it's buzzy at highway speeds. All that aside, the Tacoma is definitely the better offroad truck of the two. No matter which brand of truck I've owned, I have always prioritized decent ground clearance and a reliable 4-wheel drive. The Tundra TRD Pro is a mediocre offroad package. Nice shocks surrounded by a less than impressive suspension design. The Triple-tec frame is flimsy enough that you can feel how it affects the handling and stability of the truck, and the 5.7's fuel economy is terrible. I think the 2017+ F-250 6.2 gas trucks probably might match it in fuel economy. Overall, the Tacoma would be the obvious choice but the powertain is really unimpressive. It's a draw.

Honestly, Toyota would have to knock 35% off the price of a new Tundra to help me overlook all the gleaming age-related issues with the truck. The resale value is there if you think you can find someone to pay what KBB thinks its worth. But 17 MPG highway is unacceptable to me when Ford, GM, and Ram all offer more powerful, more efficient, stronger trucks for the same price (and sometimes much less). I would even wager that the difference in reliability so small it's difficult to differentiate. I mean, look at NoQDRTundra's saga with his new Tundra. That truck was at the dealer WAY too many times. The response from Toyota's Mike Sweers was so casually dismissive of NoQDR's issues, it's apparently the new normal owner experience when you own a new Toyota. Where's the reliability? Why doesn't Toyota take the issues seriously and fix them, instead of allowing design issues to go unfixed for several years? I still see new Tundras with leaking cam towers and Hino 10.5" axles with bearing issues at low mileage.

I wish I had bought a new Tundra instead of buying the new Ram.

-CT
Posted by: crunchtime | Aug 27, 2018 5:57:17 PM

Oh why is that?

I'd only buy a Tacoma if I wanted an offroader, or a stripped down base model and the price difference was significant enough to be worth it. Otherwise I hardly see much reason to buy the Tacoma over the Tundra. If you're sweating the difference in fuel economy, you probably shouldn't be buying a new truck. Not enough parking space for your Tundra? Buy a Corolla.

In the end both are Toyotas, the oatmeal of vehicle brands: boring but offers a long life... but is it an exciting one?

I have a tundra n for no reason my radio just stop playing for no reason n you folks want $3000 for a replacement im letting tundra go n bac to the dodge ram a very unhappy person who pay her bill

I work for Toyota and some of these facts on the Tacoma are a little off. Nothing too drastic but the mrsp they listed is a $1000 less than that of a TRD Pro. The trd off-road does not come with leather and it does have a smart key.

No reason to buy a tundra. The big three are better trucks in many ways and a much better value. Toyota reliability is still there but is not really significantly better than other brands anymore.


The tacoma has some strong points for a mid-size but it is still not really a good value compared to a stripped down full-size ford or chevy.

Not sure why Toyota has not done an all new Tacoma or Tundra since 2004 or 2007 respectively. Clearly these trucks make a lot of money for Toyota, so it is hard to understand why they don't invest much in them. I know they are working on replacement models for both, I think for the 2020 model year? In the meantime, while they are both reasonably reliable, they are just plain outclassed by much of their competition. It would be hard for me to spend the big bucks on a new truck that looks 15 years old from the day you drive it off the lot.

it is still not really a good value compared to a stripped down full-size ford or chevy...Posted by: beebe | Aug 27, 2018

@beebe

Well said! Compare a new F150 3.3 base model regular cab pickup to the Tacoma. Or a super cab 5.0

The Tacoma has lost its way. It was never a comfortable truck for anybody over 5'10" tall, but the old 4.0 engine (even with the auto trans) was a solid package on road or off.

Now with the recent drivetrain changes, you get lousy gas mileage and worse acceleration. dumb.

"The tacoma has some strong points for a mid-size but it is still not really a good value compared to a stripped down full-size ford or chevy." ---- Posted by: beebe

That's where opinions will vary. For one, at the same price you're getting a well-equipped Tacoma compared to that stripper, which really means a better value. Add to that the fact that the Tacoma is smaller... enough so to fit into a garage reasonably comfortably and can maneuver in tight city streets and even on narrow country roads better than the full-sized 'stripper.'

It all depends on what the buyer needs as to which is the better value. If all you want is a basic utilitarian truck and size doesn't matter, then yes, the full-sized stripper is a good value. But if you prefer comfort and features to go WITH that utility, then you either pay more for the full-sized version or get the marginally smaller one at the same price as that 'stripper.'

then you either pay more for the full-sized version or get the marginally smaller one at the same price as that 'stripper.'
Posted by: Vulpine | Aug 28, 2018

@vulpine

What planet are you from???

The Tacoma in this story is over $40k. You can buy a basic half ton Ford or Chevy in the low 30s and even less later on in the year.

The Tacoma gets lousy mileage, has poor overall performance and comes loaded with Off Road capabilities that even off road fans only use once in a while. What utility are you talking about.

Comfort? You clearly have never been in a Tacoma.

I see TNT and gms are using my name again. The real Nitro is here.

The Toyotas are still nicer than the gm twins. Who cares about gas mileage unless your tnt and get 30 in your 6.2...

@ nitro and HD Ram King
My 2017 SD must be one in a million. 22k miles and no death wobble - in fact, not a single issue at all.
Sure am lucky....
My friends Ram HD dropped its drivers side tie rod end and chewed up his ball joints at 30k... sure was unlucky...

@oxi

Are you using Nitro's name again?

@ Nitro

Have no need to use your name man.

BTW...get your jealous facts straight. Its 23.8 not 30. Geez. U hoodwinks are all the same.

I see TNT and gms are using my name again. The real Nitro is here.

The Toyotas are still nicer than the gm twins. Who cares about gas mileage unless your tnt and get 30 in your 6.2...


Posted by: Nitro | Aug 28, 2018 6:46:36 AM

Using your name again, which name are they using?

-CT

Go to the Taco forum and every body complains about the motor, in a small truck the power should come on before 5,000rpm..take those bilstien shocks off and put some rancho's on and you will have a nice riding truck, that is what I did..before the frame rusted in two

@Brick: The role of the Tundra in Toyota's vehicle line-up is definitely questionable. As you've noted, problems with it persist. As a matter of fact it is the most problematic vehicle in Toyota lineup in recent years. Also, Compare the marketing of it back in '07, '08, '09, and '10' to today; back then it was a tough truck ready to take on the big three. Now, one has to wonder if it's been put out to pasture at the Andersen Cattle Ranch. The Tacoma is set to have a record sales year, which is helped by sacrificing--perhaps--Tundra sales. Like I noted earlier, there's no rivalry as the Tacoma does more good for Toyota's image than the red-headed step child does.

You're spot on about MS's dismissive comments as I honestly expected more of an "engineering" response from him being an engineer. I can understand bad things happen during production of parts and assembly of them. But just to sum it up as "Not ours or TSB" goes to show just how little control Toyota has over QDR. I would like to have a open conversation with MS someday.

What Toyota has much more control over is ones ownership experience and for that they were dismissive as well. The Toyota today is not the same as the Toyota of the late 90's.

Didn't know NoQDRTundra's tundra issues represent all tundra's. Sounds like a whiny kids who thinks he's entitled to perfection... lol

@uh huh: My expectations were set by owning serveral GM trucks and a Dodge.

I would have to go with the Tundra for the added interior space.

Dealerships make a huge difference in regards to warranty for every manufacture. Dealerships can go to bat or can leave you out to fend for yourself.

I have a buddy that has a 7" lifted Tundra on 37" tires and Toyota has warrantied stuff that they really shouldn't be once you modify a truck as such. I think Toyota has replaced his CV axles at least once under warranty due to tore boots from the increased CV angles as a result of the lift kit.

Dealerships make a huge difference in regards to warranty for every manufacture. Dealerships can go to bat or can leave you out to fend for yourself.

I have a buddy that has a 7" lifted Tundra on 37" tires and Toyota has warrantied stuff that they really shouldn't be once you modify a truck as such. I think Toyota has replaced his CV axles at least once under warranty due to tore boots from the increased CV angles as a result of the lift kit.

How many trucks has your buddy bought there? Does he spend a lot with that shop? It matters.

If Toyota thinks their support will help sustain a good customer relationship they will pitch in.

If they hadnt used the tow/haul button in the Tundra the fuel economy differences would have been very small... you dont need to hit tow/haul for that little bit of weight.

you dont need to hit tow/haul for that little bit of weight.
Posted by: hemi lol | Aug 28, 2018

@Hemi

Great point! Also cannot understand the super low rear end (gear) in the Tundra.

@ Nitro

Have no need to use your name man.

BTW...get your jealous facts straight. Its 23.8 not 30. Geez. U hoodwinks are all the same.


Posted by: TNTGMC | Aug 28, 2018 7:21:54 AM

You seem to think everyone is jealous of you? That's not good. A sure sign of someone who says they have more than they do and they lash out at everyone else for wanting what they "allegedly have". I get 19mpg outta my 6.2 and that's good. Stop lying and making real GM owners look like idiots.

For as long as I can remember, Dodge has been know to be a lemon. Not necessarily major problems but lots of small issues. Windows won't roll down, knobs fall off, gauges stop working, AC issues, electrical problems. Etc
General motors trucks, I've had a few. Rattling noises, interior control knobs lettering wears off, door hinges wear out, suspension problems.
Ford's are just plain ugly, except for the raptor. I don't like their ride or handling. I have a F350 4 door that only one of the electric widows work. The door handles break, neither of the lighter/power outlets work, AC won't hold refrigerant. Etc
I have a 28 year old Toyota extra cab 4x4.I bought it new. Everything still works on it. Except for the junk in the glove box, it doesn't rattle, it gets over 20 mpg, interior/dash pad and instruments haven't faded or cracked. Nothing has rusted out and original paint is still pretty good. I could go on. The only thing I can think of is the drivers side seat and door hinges are wore.
That's what I base my opinion on.Track record. That's why I bought a 2018 tundra trd.

Tacoma is catching up and still ideal for off-road and fun, Tundra remains the bigger brother for many work load.

@ Nitro

Have no need to use your name man.

BTW...get your jealous facts straight. Its 23.8 not 30. Geez. U hoodwinks are all the same.


Posted by: TNTGMC | Aug 28, 2018 7:21:54 AM

You seem to think everyone is jealous of you? That's not good. A sure sign of someone who says they have more than they do and they lash out at everyone else for wanting what they "allegedly have". I get 19mpg outta my 6.2 and that's good. Stop lying and making real GM owners look like idiots.


Posted by: REAL.GMC.OWNER | Aug 28, 2018 1:58:45 PM

@ Hoodwink
here's how a real man posts

@ Real GM owner

Glad to hear you get 19. Where I drive, I get 23.8 mpgs. I don't lie. My nephew who is die hard Ford guy couldn't believe it!

Stop whining! I'm not saying I get that average ALL the time, every-time I travel. I'm saying I get that on highway 75 when I travel it

BTW. for all you ford fans, my father in laws brother owns a new 2.7L eco-bust, and he averages over 25 mpgs with his traveling that highway. So I am not lying, its a very flat highway! Get a grip and a life and shove your nonsense excuses up your @$$!!

Now when I travel on interstate 29 or going to see family I have yet to get below 20 mpgs since I've owned it traveling the highway, (not in town) I have had it for 6 months and 6200 miles on it. I rarely drive it in town. We take it to our lake house and and long trips. I have a 98 Silverado for in-town use.
Anything else you want to accuse me of you clown!


@ Drools

Come up with something original please. AKA..claims he has most powerful half-ton.....lack of intelligence there boys!!

@ Drools

Come up with something original please. AKA..claims he has most powerful half-ton.....lack of intelligence there boys!!


Posted by: TNTGMC | Aug 29, 2018 8:46:27 AM

Hoodwink
you're in denial again there's ways to fix it
i posted the facts

@ Drools

Its not a fact! you don't own the most powerful half ton.

You have an 18 3.5L ecoboost
375HP------470TQ

I have a 2018 6.2L

420HP----460TQ

I have 45 more HP in my truck.
You have 10 more TQ

I have the most powerful half ton UNTIL ford releases the Raptor motor in the limited. Now, I'm done trying to explain this 3rd grade level numbers to you!

You don't post facts, you KEEP posting a You-tube video of a drag race that is Driver won! The fact that you think its a FACT is all the reasons for you to get a helmet on that head of yours

Are they still using those soft metals and lousy paint?
Practically every tundra I see over 5 years old has a severely dented tailgate, mine included. The paint chips. It just seems more car-like soft metals than the other brands.



Post a Comment

Please remember a few rules before posting comments:

  • Try to be civil to your fellow blog readers.
  • Stay on topic. We want to hear your opinions and thoughts, but please only comment about the specified topic in the blog post.
  • Your email will not be shown.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In

Home | Buy or Sell a Truck | News | Special Reports

Powered by Cars.com. By using this site, you agree to our terms of service | © 2017 Cars.com | Privacy Statement | Contact Us