Rumble in the Rockies: Are These the Most Evenly Matched HD Trucks Ever?

Rumble in the Rockies: Are These The Most Evenly Matched Trucks Ever?
Photo: Harry Rawlins

How evenly matched were the 2011 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 and 2011 Ford F-350 Super Duty that faced off in Chevy's Rocky Mountain towing challenge? We'll let you be the judge after you consider the following facts:

2011 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 LT 4WD Crew Cab

Engine: 6.6-liter Duramax V-8
Transmission: 6-speed Allison Automatic
Horsepower: 397
Torque (pounds-feet): 765
Rear Axle Ratio: 3.73
Measured Curb Weight (lbs.): 8,220
Max 5th Wheel Trailering (lbs.): 21,100
Max GCWR (lbs.): 29,200
Wheels/Tires: 235/80-R17 = 31.8 inch overall diameter
Odometer Reading in Denver (miles): 1,731
Price as Tested: $54,740
Place of Purchase: Mike Savoie Chevrolet, Troy, Mich.

Chevrolet Silverado 3500 Price as Tested

Download 2011 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 Window Sticker (Adobe PDF)

2011 Ford F-350 Super Duty XLT 4WD Crew Cab

Engine: 6.7-liter Power Stroke V-8
Transmission: 6-speed 6R140 Automatic
Horsepower: 400
Torque (pounds-feet): 800
Rear Axle Ratio: 3.73
Measured Curb Weight (lbs.): 8,440
Max 5th Wheel Trailering (lbs.): 21,700
Max GCWR (lbs.): 30,000
Wheels/Tires: 245/75-17 = 31.46 inch overall diameter
Odometer Reading in Denver (miles): 1,549
Price as Tested: $54,805
Place of Purchase: Harold Zeigler Ford Lincoln, Elkhart, Ind.

Ford F-350 Price as Tested

Download 2011 Ford F-350 Super Duty Window Sticker (Adobe PDF)

In our opinion, it doesn't get more "apples-to-apples" than these two trucks.

We'll have the full results of the Rumble in the Rockies on Nov. 15.

Comments

I'm finding this whole CDL thing confusing.
The over 10,000 lb. trailer weight guys are talking about is really puzzling as most new 1/2 tons out their can be equiped to tow around 11,000 lbs.
Would that tow rating need a CDL for personal use?
What about commercial use?
One basically needs to pay attention to the rules in their own jurisdiction or in the jurisdictions they plan to travel.
I know that where I live, I can down rate my towing and GVW numbers to save on insurance costs but if I get checked - my towing or cargo weight must be within my insured numbers. (and below the manufacturer's settings).
Commercial use 1 ton pickups must go through weigh scales whether they are loaded or empty. I had a friend find that one out the hard way. Personal use is a different story.

The lesson to be learned is to make sure you are legal and within the rules.
The problem is - most people on the roads today are clueless.
I already see elderly tourists behind the wheel of greyhound bus sized motorhomes pulling big trailers.
Scary - real scary.

@ Lou
I'm finding this whole CDL thing confusing.
The over 10,000 lb. trailer weight guys are talking about is really puzzling as most new 1/2 tons out their can be equiped to tow around 11,000 lbs.
Would that tow rating need a CDL for personal use?
What about commercial use?

Here is the federal law on the subject:

[Class A -- Any combination of vehicles with a GCWR of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class B -- Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.]

Basically, the answer is YES. If you are towing 10,000lbs behind a half ton you most likely need a Class A CDL, as your total GCWR is going to be over 26,001lbs.

Now, if you aren't towing, than you don't need a CDL unless your vehicle itself exceeds a 26,001lb GVWR. This means it's perfectly legal for someone to drive an F650 with a 25,000lb GVWR without a CDL, as long as said driver doesn't tow over 10,000lbs. This is why some times people need just an Air Brake endorsement on their license and not a full CDL, because they might drive a truck that is big enough to have air brakes, but not big enough to have a 26,001lb+ GVWR.

@Sam

I doubt Ford or Chevy will issue a recall to re-rate these vehicles. It's the buyers job to know what he needs to operate any vehicle he buys.

The Ford motor is built in Mexico. That alone is reason enough not to but one.

Silverado crewcab is made in Mexico.

You don't need a class A or B CDL for these trucks. Class A and B licenses only go by the GVWR, not the GCWR. If you look at the GVWR for each truck, the Chevy is 13,000 and the Ford is 13,300. That is right on their window stickers. If CDLs went by GCWR, then you wouldn't need a B CDL to drive a school bus, without air brakes, which weighs around 20,000 pounds empty, well under the 26,000 CDL limit. Also going by that 26,000 pound limit, the Ford and Chevy GVWRs are WAY under, so no you do not need a CDL for these.

And Shawn, you only need DOT numbers if using a truck for business. At least in PA if you want to buy a motorhome for yourself to drive, and it is over 26,000 pounds, you can get a non-commercial class B license, and not need DOT numbers on it.

i would have to go with the ford but i really like both of these trucks

i am so glad this internet thing works and your article really helped me.



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