2012 V-10 F-650s Get Ready For Sale

Production of Ford's new 2012 F-650 with a 6.8-liter V-10 gasoline engine – a class-exclusive in the medium-duty truck segment – kicked off Aug. 15 at the automaker's plant in Escobedo, Mexico.

The three-valve V-10 gas engine produces 362 horsepower and 457 pounds-feet of torque with a 6R140 six-speed transmission with double overdrive gears for improved fuel economy. An optional gaseous fuel prep package is available for conversion to compressed natural gas or propane.

The F-650 6.8-liter Pro Loader with 19.5-inch wheels starts at $54,840, and the F-650 6.8-liter Dock Height with 22-inch wheels starts at $55,065. Ford is reporting that average vehicle savings at the time of purchase for an F-650 V-10 compared with an F-650 with a diesel engine is $8,300.

Ford is moving production of the F-650 and F-750 medium-duty trucks from Escobedo to its Ohio Assembly Plant in Avon Lake, after the plant stops current production of the Ford E-Series cargo and passenger vans.

Comments

@DenverMike
Gasoline has gone down the same path as diesel engines. Lead was removed and some declared that the lead was necessary to lubricate valve etc.

On aircraft AVTUR doesn't lubricate and the pumps etc last for 10 of thousands of hours.

Why don't you think Ford hasn't made a 5.4 Eco Boost for this application. The way Ford has been talking up the Eco Boost you would think it would have been a better option.

The reason why is to design and construct an Eco Boost to run in a truck for commercial application would have probably more expensive than a diesel. It just wouldn't be durable for this type of application.

Yes I do believe the initial outlay is cheaper, but I don't really see the longer term benfits of this engine configuration. A 7 litre 6 cylinder diesel truck engine (not an HD diesel) would be better.

I'm sorry but we have exactly the same applications in Australia and if we did have this engine it would only be LPG if any fuel.

@Big Al from Oz - The V10 has the naturally aspirated torque of ancient big blocks, but with better mpg. A boosted 5.4 would be constantly under pressure and likely get worse mpg and a shorter life.

Actually I had a '75 F-500 with an 'industrial 330' gas engine and it pulled just fine. That's approx a 5.5L and had an extra thick block.

If you've never had gas engines available for commercial applications, then you're missing an important alternative to diesels. You have to admit, if you've never had a gas option for commercial class 6 and under, you can't really give an honest review.

@Denvermike
"If you've never had gas engines available for commercial applications, then you're missing an important alternative to diesels"

We have. I am the age of seeing them around. They made up a large part of the Australian Truck market, all types in the early 1950's started to taper off dramatically after that.

@DenverMike
Gas engine trucks finished in the 60s and 70s and hung around to the 80s here. We had Internationals both cab overs and normal cabs with V8 Chrysler engines, V8 Dodges, Ford D series trucks. We even had Bedford trucks with gas engines. I still think the Beford pickup was one of the nicest looking pickups around.

We used to have what were called Dodge paper trucks, they got replace by Hino's in the early 80s. The were able to do 100mph and apparently the Hino's were geared to do the same.

When I worked on a farm as a teenager we had a V8 Ford dump truck, a little larger than a F-350 with a V8.

My father had a Canadian built F-100, but in Australia it was sprung to carry over one tonne. He replaced it with a Japanese Nissan Cabstar. The Nissan with a small diesel out performed the petrol Ford and cost half as much to run.

Beford is a GM product from the UK.

http://www.speedace.info/automotive_directory/bedford.htm

International made this model into the early 70s, I think, then came out with a new cab but still had 345 V8s. I wish I knew how to combine the links into one post.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/46046969@N03/5697041743/

"My father had a Canadian built F-100, but in Australia it was sprung to carry over one tonne. He replaced it with a Japanese Nissan Cabstar. The Nissan with a small diesel out performed the petrol Ford and cost half as much to run."

@Big Al from Oz - That sounds like early '80s trucks. Things have changed a bit since then. OK, a lot.

Eighties diesel trucks were cheap to buy, cheap to maintain, cheap to service and ridiculously easy to repair. Diesel fuel was cheaper than regular unleaded and had much more lubricity. Diesel emissions were non existent which are really killing the deal.

Expect emissions to get tougher on diesels and diesel fuel. Expect future smog checks/inspections on current diesel trucks and their emissions equipment.

@DenverMike
The Europeans I think will give you some surprises in regards to diesel technology.

Gas engines have their place in the scheme of things, especially small light power sources.

It would be interesting to see how many of these trucks are sold and what applications they are used for. Maybe Ford is trying to get the last out of their V10 tooling.

@Big Al from Oz

"The Europeans I think will give you some surprises in regards to diesel technology."

If by "technology" you mean greater complexity, higher maintenance and less reliability, then I can't disagree.

"Gas engines have their place in the scheme of things, especially small light power sources."

Do you mean for light trucks?

"It would be interesting to see how many of these trucks are sold and what applications they are used for. Maybe Ford is trying to get the last out of their V10 tooling."

Yeah, it will be interesting to see how V10s sell, but a lot of truck buyers are stuck in they're ways and living (or driving) in the past.
You've got to figure that a lot of experienced fleet owners agree with me if Ford is going to the trouble of installing V10s in their 6-series (Navistar built) trucks.

This is a first since the early '80s so you know it's based on something substantiated or a big outcry for gas engines in mediums.
Or maybe Ford is doing it just for me...

@Big Al from Oz -

Gasser in medium dutys arent anything new, then again nothing from 40 years ago. In the 90's there were plenty of Medium Duty Vehicles with gas engines, Ford had a 427 (Not too sure on exact cubes) and Chevy ran the 366 and 427 Big Blocks for ages, as well as the 454 and 496 motors. Its a great idea for Ford's Fleet Customers like Municipalitys, Landscape Contractors and others who dont need the Diesel. If Your a Landscape Just hauling Some salt in winter, Mulch, or Even some stone, You dont need a Big W-900 KW Tri Axle with a C-15 Cat. Its all in what You need. A Work Truck or Medium Duty Truck aint supposed to be fast anyways.
Municipalitys and other Smaller Fleets tend to replace most trucks every 3-5 years or so, due to not getting the cost of investment out of a diesel just for a truck thats used to haul barricades and plow in Winter for a DPW Department. Now If you were using it for a hauler hooked to a good sized load every day like pulling equipment, then a diesel can win out as naturally it will be a better choice as that is what its designed to do. I mean your not gonna use a 1/4 " ratchet set to pull a Hub Out? Great for small stuff like interior panels, but its not for heavy duty.

And For Pickup Based Medium Dutys, As a Chevrolet Man, I dont get why they Discontinued the Real, Original C3500HD in the 90's they made with a whole different Frame 15K GVW and a Pickup Cab for a regular sized pickups but with Heavy Duty Undercarriage. With the way Everyone is going with HD Trucks, wanting biggest baddest most able to tow they coulda been a big hitt now

I meant to say anything that went out of date 40 years ago at the top of my comment. Plus I personally think with the Popularity of Diesels in the last 10 years skyrocketing, alot of people have a big hard-on for anything diesel. I run a lawn care business and my 95 K1500 with a 350 pulls mowers and hauls brush, plows snow and does other stuff just fine. Yeah 400 Horse and 800 Ft Lbs would be nice but cost of ownership i dont need a big diesel truck. Now when I get my Old Case 580 fixed up and get my excavating business going (Im only 20) Ill get a 6 wheeler Dump. Its all about the right tool for the job, Reason id go with a 6 wheeler is its a 4 ton Backhoe and its not too heavy, You can pull it with an old 366 or even a 350 in a 70's Chevy Dump and since im not doing Big Time Construction/Site Work, I dont need a Big Triaxle Kenworth with a Big 550 Cat, Auto Matic Tarp and all that stuff. You can buy and fix up an old chevy or Ford 6 wheeler for pennies, which a gas Medium Duty Truck is a lower cost of Owner ship dependeing on the application.

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