Classic Pickup: 1946-68 Dodge Power Wagon

1946_Power_Wagon_03 II

Words and photos by Richard Truesdell

For many truck enthusiasts, the history of Dodge trucks starts in the fall of 1993, with the introduction of the Ram pickup. In a heartbeat, Dodge went from being an also-ran in the light-duty pickup-truck market to a major competitor to established leaders Ford and Chevrolet.

Looking back, it's easy to remember Chrysler executive Bob Lutz saying, “Even though 80 percent of the focus group participants hated the proposed 1994 Ram, 20 percent were in love with it. If only half actually bought the upcoming Ram, then we'll more than double our share!" Since 1993, Dodge's share of the full-size pickup truck marketplace has exploded, with the brand typically capturing about 20 percent of the overall market every year.

But the reality is that Dodge has a heritage in hard-working trucks dating back to 1916. And of all the pickup trucks that Dodge has ever produced, one stands out: the Dodge Power Wagon, the first factory-built 4X4.

The civilian Dodge Power Wagon was designed off an existing T214 Dodge truck chassis that served the Allies during World War II. More than a quarter-million examples were built. It was offered virtually unchanged in appearance from the spring of 1946 to 1968, when the model was discontinued for domestic sales. (Production for exports continued.) The rugged Power Wagon was a no-nonsense truck, a throwback to a time when trucks were trucks and there was little effort to move upmarket with carlike features.   

The civilian Power Wagon, introduced in February 1946, answered the question from many returning GIs: "Where can I get a truck like the one I used in the war?" Dodge answered by producing the no-compromise WDX, now best known as the Power Wagon. The truck cost around $1,600 — more than twice that of more conventional half-ton pickups. (When you adjust for inflation, $1,600 in 1946 translates to about $19,000 today.)

1946_Power_Wagon_09 II
The Power Wagon shared its basic design and 126-inch wheelbase with the three-quarter-ton weapons carrier, and the front shell and grille were similar to the T234 three-quarter-ton heavy-duty truck built by Dodge for the Chinese Army, which earned its stripes along the Burma Road. It should be noted that Dodge was the first to offer factory-built 4X4s, something that was not matched by Ford and GM until well into the 1950s.

The truck’s 126-inch wheelbase was a near-halfway point between the 120- and 133-inch wheelbases on Dodge’s more conventional “Job Rated” one-ton two-wheel-drive trucks. The Power Wagon’s large fenders gave owners plenty of room to increase wheel diameter for extra-heavy-duty applications. Standard wheels were 16x5.50 inches wearing 7.50x16-inch eight-ply tires, or 16x6.50 inches wearing 9x16-inch eight-ply rubber.

The styling of the Power Wagon was a carryover from the truck's prewar 1939 design. The top of the hood and radiator surround were borrowed from one of Dodge’s three-ton cargo trucks. The interior looked Spartan, with functionality its main calling card.

In 1961, a 251-cubic-inch flat-head engine began to replace the original and somewhat underpowered 230-cubic-inch flat-head motor that dated back to the prewar era. A synchromesh transmission, alternator and a 12-volt electrical system upgrade were among the major changes over the years. Many Power Wagons were converted into fire engines, school buses and other specialized applications. (The 1949 Power Wagon firetruck shown here is equipped with a body from the American Fire Apparatus in Battle Creek, Mich.) According to “Dodge Trucks” by Don Bunn, some Power Wagons were even converted with wagon bodywork, making them the original Dodge SUVs. (These were available with both four and six doors.)

1946_Power_Wagon_08 II
A total of 95,145 WDX-WM300 Power Wagons were sold domestically between 1946 and 1968. After that, they were built mainly for export, and owners in less-developed countries appreciated the truck’s reputation for ruggedness.

The dark blue example shown here is owned by Jim Hetrick of Lake Forest, Calif. According to the owner, this is one of the earliest surviving and running Power Wagons from the truck’s first year of production. First-year civilian production totaled 2,890 units. While Power Wagons surface regularly on eBay and other auction websites, the best way to acquire one is to get active in the online Dodge Power Wagon communities and let them know your desire to add one to your collection.

Author Notes

Dodge has used the Power Wagon name several times over the years, starting in 1957 with the light-duty half-ton W100 (two-wheel-drive) and W200 (four-wheel-drive) models followed by the one-ton W300 in 1958. Starting in 1956, the chassis-cab-only W500 two-ton model was offered; production ended in 1971when it was replaced with the W600 for the 1972 model year. Its production ended in 1977 with the discontinuation of all medium-duty Dodge trucks.

1999_Dodge_Power_Wagon_concept_truck II
A concept version Power Wagon, powered by a Cummins turbo-diesel engine, debuted at the 1999 North American International Auto Show. Some of its styling cues were incorporated in the mainstream Ram pickups with the 2002-08 (DR) generation. Starting in 2005, an off-road-oriented heavy-duty Power Wagon version was added to the Ram lineup, where it continues to this day. For more photos of this classic Power Wagon, go to our Facebook page and Like us. 

  1946_Power_Wagon_02 II

 

Comments

Wow - a Chevy troll workin' a Dodge thread.

Will wonders never cease?


@Lou, I'm surprised at ol Greggy/Bob here (aka SierraGS aka Bvonscott). He's one of the founding fathers of Anti-Chevrolet.com. Or better known as GMInsideNews by the Buick-Pontiac-GMC crowd of kids that runs the show over there. It must screw him up inside something fierce to post positive words concerning Chevrolet under his Greg/Bob guise..


As for Ford... blah. Their Super Duty is cool but that's about it

@MoparMadness, Pfftt.. The day Dodge can touch Ford in truck sales will be the day you can talk trash. If Chevy got their act together you'd be in trouble. I suspect though to your pleasure they won't and you'll indeed have your shot. Good luck. You're going to need everything you can get. You think we're giving up the throne? I'll quote an old song from my college years. "You got another thing comin".

The reason Ram is 3rd in sales is simple....they last so long you dont need to buy a new one. HaHa. J/K.

Love the Power Wagons.....simply put...Ford and Chevy simply have nothing to match what a power wagon can do new or old. Defanitly a benchmark in hardcore truck production.

#one in sales has never been a factor when buying a new truck.
Getting the best truck for me and my hard earned money does.
That's why I don't drive a Toyota Camry or Ford f150 both top sellers but i did my home work and for money and needs it was my 2003 Dodge Ram 1500. Truck does everything i ask of it with gusto. 9 years old next month 73,000 trouble free miles.
I would recommend Dodge Ram to anyone. The new Rams are so much better then my old 2003 but my Die Hard Dodge still runs , looks great and the best part is i own it.

"9 years old next month 73,000 trouble free miles...The new Rams are so much better then my old 2003 but my Die Hard Dodge still runs..."

That is neither that old nor is it that many miles. I'd be surprised if a 2003 with only 73k miles didn't run great, no matter which brand.

Luke, Considering trade inns are at a record high at six years. I would say 9 years is pretty good. I plan on driving it a lot longer.

@HEMI V8
Considering the average age of vehicles on the road is just shy of 11 years, I'd say your truck hasn't reached what would be considered "old." But if you continue to average only 8k miles per year, you should have no trouble reaching "old" status.

I'll take that '99 concept. Yes, I know I hate big trucks, but that one actually looks like one.

@Hemi V-8-73,000 mile on a 9 year old truck, you barely have it broken in. You would be crazy to sell it or trade it in. When bought my Isuzu 4 years ago my S-10 was 9 years old at the time with 82,000 miles. I was offer 3k for it in a trade in for a truck that ran and looked like new. I kept it and now have 96,800 miles and still looks and runs like new and if anything it has reached the bottom of the depreciation schedule and might go up in value a little. I had that happen on a 85 Mitsubishi Mighty Max after 10 years it went up in value. Most modern day cars and trucks can easily go 200k miles and with proper care many more miles than that. I read an article about a mechanic in Maine that a 1990 Honda Accord with over a million miles which looked and ran like new and Honda gave him a new 2012 Accord and a picture was taken of him by the 1990 and 2012 Accord. Take care of your RAM and you will get many many more years out of it (maybe if you want you could try for a million miles). Happy motoring.

I'd have to say that is one advantage you "southern boys" have over me (I can say that since most things are south of me LOL). In a place like California or warmer climates that rarely see cold weather, it is easy to get long life out of a truck. The F250 I used to own was pretty much finished with only 110,000 miles on it after 15 winters. I used it mostly in the winter, hunting and fishing, and hauling toys.
A few years back there was a story that made the news about a million mile truck that a guy used to deliver newspapers. He had racked up that milleage in a short period of time (7 years IIRC). There were Canadian vehicle experts that commented that it would be highly unlikely to see that kind of life in our colder climate because engines take a beating going from being a cold lump of -40C metal to operating temperature. Gravel roads pound the crap out of a truck. My brother's old company truck was beat to death at 150,000 miles in 4 years.

@Lou-We have the salt and liquid melting chemicals on the roads in N KY to treat snow and ice and we have gravel and dirt roads in the rural areas. We have our share of rust but the metal on vehicles is better treated for corrosion than it was over 20 years ago. On my S-10 I recently had part of the lower quarter panel under the driver's side portion of the extended panel replaced. I could have had it filled in but I plan on keeping it for a while. I had a 2 staged MTD snowthrower that had rusted so bad on the bottom after 6 years the bottom fell out when I was using it. It is hard to wash salt off of a snowthrower when the temperature is 30 or below. I wax all of my vehicles with car wax paste before winter and run all through the car wash after each snow. I pay extra to get the bottoms sprayed and then rinsed with fresh water. All vehicles are garaged except the S-10. In California, Texas, or Florida one of the only times vehicles will rust as if they are near salt water and if you wash your vehicle after a day at the beach it probably will never rust.

@Jeff S - I was thinking more about the drivetrain. Oil doesn't warm up so you basically are metal on metal. Seals etc. don't seem to last as long either. Starting a vehicle, even with the block heater plugged in can be real hard on it. My dad used to work in logging and construction and metal would get brittle and crack in -35C (-31F) or colder weather.
There are milder climates that can have worse rust problems than where I live.
My brother-in-law lived on the Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwaii) and it rarely freezes there. His truck looked like hell underneath due to the damp and salt from the beaches even though he had his own pressure washer.
I find that our weather has gotten milder in the winter but that seems to make rust worse. Once it gets -15C (5F) or colder de-icing compounds don't work so rust isn't too bad a problem.

My friends, In the very near future you will see photos of RAM trucks plastered on the pages of these articles discussing truck sales. I am sure you are asking why. The answer is simple my simple minded Ford fans looking through Blue Oval Glasses: RAM WILL BE THE SALES LEADER IN THE FULL SIZE CATAGORY IN TWO TO THREE YEARS. Ford will be 2nd or 3rd since they refuse to completely redesign their trucks. GET WITH THE PROGRAM OR GET RUN OVER BY THE COMPETITION!

GUTS
GLORY
UP TO DATE AND INNOVATIVE
RAM

LMAO!!!!!!

@Lou
We don't seem to have the issue with cold weather. My concern if the AC not working.

Snow is something that is seen on TV :)

In the very near future you will see photos of RAM trucks plastered on the pages of these articles discussing truck sales. I am sure you are asking why. The answer is simple my simple minded Ford fans looking through Blue Oval Glasses: RAM WILL BE THE SALES LEADER IN THE FULL SIZE CATAGORY IN TWO TO THREE YEARS. Ford will be 2nd or 3rd since they refuse to completely redesign their trucks. GET WITH THE PROGRAM OR GET RUN OVER BY THE COMPETITION!

GUTS
GLORY
UP TO DATE AND INNOVATIVE
RAM

Posted by: Hemi_4U | Aug 10, 2012 6:30:13 AM

Imitation is the best form of flattery I guess. I posted this on another thread. Rick Truesdell II must have been very inspired, so he decided to post it on this thread under his name.

GUTS
GLORY
HEMI-POWERED
#1 RAM

@Lou--I see your point about the extreme cold and the metal to metal. You just have to do the best with what you have but even though your vehicles might not last as long as they do south of you it appears that you still get your moneys worth in use. Your brother getting 150k miles in 4 years out of a company truck is not too shabby. Extreme weather is very hard on any kind of equipment and shortens the life of any piece of equipment.

At least these Ram guys have a sense of humor.

Ford Raptor vs Ram Runner!

From Mike Levine...

Ford Trucks‏@FordTrucks

@MotorTrend compares the F-150 SVT Raptor against the Ram Runner kit. The result? Raptor finishes first. http://tinyurl.com/cxp3l6e ^ML

RAM WILL BE THE SALES LEADER IN THE FULL SIZE CATAGORY IN TWO TO THREE YEARS. Ford will be 2nd or 3rd since they refuse to completely redesign their trucks.

@Hemi, do elaborate please. Redesign what? The Super Duty? The F-150? What are you referring to? We have new engines, we always keep our interiors at the top of their class. The only possible thing you could be talking about would be a body redesign. You honestly think that's not coming for the F-150? Think again. I personally don't want to see our dedicated HD truck "Super Duty" ever change. It's perfect as is. Why ruin a great product just for the sake of saying you changed something? Look at how the Silverado design and thus legacy was wrecked little by little going from the classic 98 to the less than stellar 99. Then going all out ugly a few years later in 03. Only then to mix it up again and get even uglier in 07. It's hurt their sales, reputation and loyalty badly. Yet when they stuck with a tried and true formula from 73-87 or 88-98 they had a huge following of a fantastic product. This is what Ford is doing now. Precisely what Chevrolet used to do and it's very successful. I'd rather Alan not listen to the Dodge crowd on this subject.

@Scott,

They said the RAM drives crap, did you see how horrible the RAM handled. The RAM Runner is purpose built-truck as the Raptor is an all around truck. Nice try RAM!

@Big Al from Oz --We have issues with air conditioners in N KY. It might not get quite as hot as in Australia but it is not unusual to hit 100 plus fahrenheit and mostly in the mid to high 90s this summer. When I lived in Houston, TX I was lucky to get 5 years out of my home central air. At 11pm it goes down 2 degrees and it is still in the 90s. Nothing to see temperature and humidity match. The Ohio River Valley where I live the humidity is usually 70 percent or above. I had the air compressor replace 3 times on my wife's 2000 Ford Taurus. My 99 S-10 has never had the compressor replaced but last year it was less than a pound low on R-134. This year it needs some more but I will hold off till spring. Air compressors are not cheap but at least you can replace them whereas rust and what Lou is talking about all you can really do is scrap the vehicle. I have had better luck with GM air conditioners but any air conditioner under continuous use and extreme use will not last as long. I can attest to this living in Houston, TX for 29 years which has a semi tropical climate. Before air conditioning was widespread there people would tell me that mold would form on clothes in their closets. Heat and high humidity are real tests of an air conditioner. Give me hot and dry any day.

Frank, MT got it right. The Ram Runner is a unitasker whereas the Raptor is a complete product. PUTC dropped the ball on their comparison.

That Concept PowerWagon is probably the only full-sized pickup I could say I really want.

@ FordTrucks1

I am referring to the entire Ford truck line, which includes F-150, Super Duty, and the dead Ranger. The ancient Ranger dated back to 1993 before it was killed off last year. Super Duty dates back to 1999 with very modest sheet metal updates. Super Duty perfect? Get real. There is no man man product on earth that is perfect. As far as your precious F-150 goes, it dates back to 2004 with modest exterior changes and and a new interior and powertrain. The fact of the matter is IT IS NOT A COMPLETE REDESIGN. Be honest, if the roles were reversed and Chevrolet was doing what Ford has done with dragging out body styles for decades a time with modest updates, YOU'D BE CRYING ABOUT THAT AS WELL. I am a RAM/Dodge fan down to the bone, but I will give some credit to the current GM HD truck for it's powertrain and chassis. The current truck holds weight and pulls 100 times better than the GMT-400 ever did. The 400's sagged really bad when loaded. However, they do not compare to the 400 in looks and sheet metal thickness. None of that matters anyway because RAM BLOWS ALL OF THEM AWAY ESPECIALLY FORD!!
You post as though you know Alan Mulally? I call BS on that one!

GUTS
GLORY
RAM
ALWAYS BLOWING AWAY THE COMPETITION

@Scott, et. al: Based on other articles, I've begun to believe the Raptor is a flimsy, overpriced piece of junk. Maybe those 10 (out of 14?) Raptors were overdriven, but the simple fact that they bent the frames on brand-new trucks implies that the frames weren't strong enough in the first place. I'm certainly not willing to spend some $60-$70 thousand dollars on something I can't even trust to hold up to hard use. Sure, I might bend the frame on my Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, but it also only cost 1/3rd as much.

@Vulpine,

Please drive your truck in a 12 inch ditch at 100 mph, it wouldn't be able to be driven home. I'd take the Raptor any day.

Frank,
Please drive your antiquated POS F-250 into the ditch at 100 mph. Oh wait.....it won't go that fast as it would more than likely start spitting spark plugs before it reached 50 mph. Nice try Frankie Troll!

Guys in all honesty I do not see any major redesigns of any from any of the manufacturers regardless of what PR they give to the public saying they are doing so. Lets be honest even the RAM is not totally redesigned it has the basic same design as in 1994. The F-150 is basically the same as 2004 and the HD Fords are about the same as they have been since the early 90s except changing the front end. Chevy and GMC have not changed that much and I serious doubt the exteriors on the 2014 will change that much. The noticeable changes for all will occur on the 2015 and after models as all will have to comply with new fuel standards. Yes there have been new motors, transmissions, leaf versus non leaf springs, additional trim packages, man steps, tool boxes built into the fenders and beds, and a few other tweaks here and there. Tell me the truth is that so bad? If I were any of these manufacturers I would in all honesty do the same thing and I would be working on those 2015 standards now which I am sure they are. Maybe GM would have been better to follow what Ford and Ram is doing by making a few changes here and there but lets get real about this. If you make too drastic of an exterior change you risk losing your base and most truck buyers are a very conservative lot. In the next 13 years we will all see the 1/2 ton pickups go through a metamorphis which will be a lot more noticeable (that also includes Toyota and Nissan). I know some of you will argue this point till the cows come home and if I were in the advertising business I would feel proud that I accomplished having an advertising campaign that got a lot of buyers to believe that a product has been completely redesigned when in reality it hasn't been. That would truly be a successful marketing campaign.

^^^ Crawl back into your hole, BITCHAGAN BOB!

pur·pose   [pur-puhs] Show IPA noun, verb, pur·posed, pur·pos·ing.
noun
1.
the reason for which something exists or is done, made, used, etc.
2.
an intended or desired result; end; aim; goal.

BOTH RAM RUNNER AND RAPTOR ARE PURPOSE BUILT TRUCKS!

RAM RUNNER BEAT THE RAPTOR AT IT'S PURPOSE. GOING FAST IN THE DESERT PERIOD. END OF STORY.

IF YOU WANT THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS BUY THE POWER WAGON WHO BEAT THE RAPTOR IN COMPARISON.
According to Four Wheeler’s technical editor, Sean Holman, the fight between the two trucks was incredibly close but the Power Wagon’s superior trail performance in multiple off-road scenarios helped give it the win. The heavier Power Wagon also beat the Raptor in 0-to-60 mph performance and in the quarter-mile. Hardware features, like an integrated winch, front diff locker and powerful 5.7-liter Hemi engine solidified the Power Wagon’s position.
The staff of Four Wheeler magazine, photo credit: Ken Brubaker
According to Four Wheeler’s technical editor, Sean Holman, the fight between the two trucks was incredibly close but the Power Wagon’s superior trail performance in multiple off-road scenarios helped give it the win. The heavier Power Wagon also beat the Raptor in 0-to-60 mph performance and in the quarter-mile. Hardware features, like an integrated winch, front diff locker and powerful 5.7-liter Hemi engine solidified the Power Wagon’s position.
The staff of Four Wheeler magazine, photo credit: Ken Brubaker
“The new Power Wagon is quite nearly the best of all worlds,” said Four Wheeler Editor Douglas McColloch. “Its tall stance and body-on-frame architecture don’t get in the way of delivering a pleasant and relatively quiet highway ride. Its work-truck ethic is belied by its eight-lug axles and 10,000-pound tow rating. And once off the pavement, deep in the dirt, the Power Wagon can simply go places, and do things, that no other fullsize truck on the planet can. Locking differentials, a disconnecting front swaybar, and a 12,000-pound winch---delivered straight from the factory---will do that for you. All in all, the Power Wagon is a very worthy winner of our Pickup Truck of the Year competition.”. “Its tall stance and body-on-frame architecture don’t get in the way of delivering a pleasant and relatively quiet highway ride. Its work-truck ethic is belied by its eight-lug axles and 10,000-pound tow rating. And once off the pavement, deep in the dirt, the Power Wagon can simply go places, and do things, that no other fullsize truck on the planet can. Locking differentials, a disconnecting front swaybar, and a 12,000-pound winch---delivered straight from the factory---will do that for you. All in all, the Power Wagon is a very worthy winner of our Pickup Truck of the Year competition.”

“The new Power Wagon is quite nearly the best of all worlds,” said Four Wheeler Editor Douglas McColloch.

Nah, Power Wagon nor Ram Runner do nothing for me, not to mention the bad reputation Dodge Ram trucks have.

NO THANKS!

Who cares what Mike Levine or Motor Trend says? They are both losers!

Mike Levine, Frank and Scott are trolls and jealous haters!

Notice Mike Levine said nothing about the PUTC Shootout in the desert!

Haters = [H]aving [A]nger [T]owards [E]veryone [R]eaching [S]uccess

GUTS

GLORY

RAM kicking ass and taking names in 2013!!!!!!!!

@HEMIMAN,

I'm a hater because I have a preference that suits my needs, sorry I am listening to your propaganda and troll comments.

Here is a video that best describes you and your Ram friends.

Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrgpZ0fUixs

LMAO @ Frankie Troll....FYI this isn't Bob.

Got my ram company truck 8 months ago. 4x4 crew cab with the hemi. Drives pretty good but i'm so glad I don't have to pay for repairs. The service manager knows me by my first name now and i'm so glad my company picks up the repair bills for this p.o.s It gets decent mileage as long as I stay out of it. Got to pick it up this afternoon, in the shop again for a/c compressor replacement, 2nd one this year. 56,345 miles of hell. Boss said as soon as the lease runs out he will change brands. He has 8 of these truck and even with this gloryfied warranty he says screw em. Says he's going back to, you guessed it F150's. We had so much better service out of them but dodge cut him a deal on these rammers and that won't happen again. You live and learn. Love this old Power Wagon though!

@ FRANK IS A TROLL,

Be a man and post under your real name, oh wait, you can't because your a little BITCH!

Kieth.....blah blah yea and our fleet of super dutys are absolutely no better. I have better luck with Rams. They all need repairs as do any working machines.

@Keith, I had a Ford ONCE. It caught on fire and burned. I still had to make the payments on that P.O.S Did not get the recall before trading it for a car that ran so i could go to work. Needless to say i got &$%^&$. Never again FORD. You think they have it figured out by now. This was in 1989. Guess not.
http://www.switchfires.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvBm894SDbQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XK7umldMCV4&feature=related

If you didn't get your recall or wasn't aware of it Ford didn't cover any damage to your burnt car or house. Piss on FORD.

I had a DODGE RAM. All it did was,

Drop

Oil

Drop

Grease

Everywhere

....and when you see Ford & Chevy,

Move

Out

People

Are

Racing

@Jeff - my brother's company truck was starting to need repairs and had a lot of things wrong with it. His company used to go 3 years or 60000 miles due to resale and repairs. They thought they could save money by switching to1/2 tons and lengthening the run time to 5 years or 120,000 miles. Costs have actually skirocketed. He got stuck with the longer run time because they have tried to force everyone into 1/2 reg cab trucks. I've never riden in a truck that felt that severely worn out. I couldn't see it being resold.

@hemiV8 - how's the cut and paste working out for you?

@vulpine - all of the trucks that bent frames were modified trucks running aftermarket spring mods and many had tuner chips allowing ungoverned speeds over 115 mph. The 2 trucks that didn't bend frames were stock.
Softer than stock springs allow less cargo capacity in exchange for more rapid wheel travel. Add higher than factory top speeds. That equals to increased shock absorber loads, equals heat build up, equals heat fade. The shocks cannot slow down high speed wheel travel. Hit an object that causes extreme wheel travel with loss of shock function means that energy has to go somewhere..

@Lou--It sounds like with the weather you have that nothing would hold up to it particularily a work truck. That is severe use in the true definition.

@Jeff S,
The Climate varies a lot in Australia. Where Big Al From OZ is it is more like South East Asia. Here in Sydney a very mild climate, with the Australian Alps bring several hundred miles to the south in my state. There they have more snow than Switzerland.

@Rich Truesdell I know it was not built as a Pickup, but the World war 2 Canadian Pattern or "Blitz Truck" had a similar history to the Power Wagon, being widely used for firefighting, towing etc outside NA.
Unlike the Power Wagon they were not specifically designed as a civilian vehicles, but war surplus items.
http://fire-engine-photos.com.s3.amazonaws.com/30536.jpg

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6079/6126788629_b9fb6bde69.jpg

http://bonzle.com/h/d/c/h/pbxe7.jpg

*I look at late-model Ford trucks and all I see is a big-@$$ ugly nose with--for me--a lousy reputation for reliability. Others' experiences may vary.

*I look at late-model Chevy/GMC trucks and all I see is "style" with--since others here have pointed it out--wrinkled sheet metal on the sides. Flimsy. Others' experiences may vary.

*I look at late-model RAM trucks and all I see is 'wannabe big truck' nose and an uncertain reputation for reliability. Others' experiences may vary.

*I look at late-model Toyota and Nissan trucks and I see wannabe American trucks that are far too big compared to where they started.

Do I find any that I like? No. Not one. I see posers, garage queens and pretenders that are all far bigger than they need to be because YOU (as a group) demanded it for the loads they are expected to carry and pull.

Bring back the K-10, F-100, "RAM" 1000. Bring back the S-10, the original Ranger, D-50, B-3000, etc. Get rid of the pretenders and lets get back to what trucks are supposed to be.

Yeap got my recall on the cruise control fire. Fixed my truck with no questions asked. Come to find out Ford didn't even make the defective part, they just trusted someone to supply it. I also had a dodge pickup long before I got this company truck and that was my last one. Well as it turned out I got stuck with another one as my company truck. My 97 F150 with 230,000 miles that I bought new has been and still is my Baby. I'd trust it way before this POS ram sitting in the driveway. Glad it ain't mine. Take that ram somewhere please, hopefully the junkyard. Don't want anyone to have this one as it would really make me feel bad for them. Drove the ram home today from the shop and it cut off on me. Check engine light is on again. Jumps and shutters now. Glad its Friday, it can sit all weekend and i've already called the Boss, he ain't happy. Have 3 of 8 rams in the shop now, fixing to have 4. Maybe they will torch themselves!

@MotorOilMcCall

intelligenceless
stupidityfull
Stick that in your a..

@Jeff S
When driving its best to allow all of the vehicles working parts to reach operational temperature before any heavy loads are applied.

What this does is it allows the working parts fit and clearances to be at their optimum, reduces wear.

Lou is very correct in describing the viscosity of oil at low temperatures.

Also, with A/Cs run them once a week for a few minutes even in the winter. Operating your A/C keeps the working parts and seals "protected" and reduces the risk of seal failure.

"Drove the ram home today from the shop and it cut off on me. Check engine light is on again. Jumps and shutters now"

Sounds like faulty injector and low fuel rail pressure. Check the codes. Ram owners always carry a code reader.

@Jeff S - correct. The kind of work my brother does, a truck does not last long. That is REGARDLESS of brand. I thought I'd bold that one out for the brand rivalry types. He is responsible for road, bridge, and camp construction and maintenance. He drives mostly dirt roads unless he has a lot of really remote or odd places to go, then his company gives him helicopter time.
He found the drivetrain held up well in the 2 previous Chevy trucks he had had. The last one had shifting problems and the dealer could not fix it or the tow haul mode didn't work right for the last year of the truck's life. THe body did seem flimsier than the other brands he has had, same goes for the bumpers. He never had any problems with "low slung" frames. He thought it would be a problem at first being used to Ford's and Dodge's.
He didn't have any problems with the Ford or Dodge trucks either. They all die or fall apart at similar rates with the exception of the bodies. The Gm/Chev trucks did look beat up earlier than the other brands. He did prefer the Ford's and Dodges as they sat higher, and were more comfortable. For a guy who sometimes spends 14 hrs in the cab of his pickup in some pretty harsh and remote environments, I take his word for what works or doesn't.
They should give him an Ecoboost F150 for a torture test. It isn't as attention grabbing as Baja, but it would be more credible for truck guys out there.

@Hemi V8 - you had to make payments on a Mustang that burnt to the ground. That is rather unfortunate BUT is it Ford's fault that you didn't have comprehensive insurance?
I mentioned this before, my neighbour's house caught fire because his Polaris quad caught fire, burnt the shed down, and had just spread to the house once the fire department showed up. Neither the insurance company or the fire department try to blame or sue Polaris even though there was a record of fires with his particular quad.
My neighbour now owns a CanAm and swears that he won't own another Polaris.
THAT IS WHY WE BUY INSURANCE!
Just a friendly reminder that it does appear that your are heading back to the Ram Bam Spam stuff.
How many more times are you going to cut and paste that Power Wagon test result?



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