Update 3: Cummins, Feds Continue Developing I-4 for Nissan Titan

Nissan Cummins Atlas II

There is clear progress being made with the continued testing of a small and powerful light-duty Cummins engine in a half-ton pickup truck. We've been following this story for several years now, and our most recent update comes via a recently discovered report on the internet.

The project was started to determine the feasibility and value of an efficient, light-duty diesel in the half-ton pickup truck segment. The guinea pig pickup for the project, called Atlas, is a 2010 Nissan Titan. We've been told by Department of Energy officials and Nissan representatives that no official announcement about the partnering of the two brands for an upcoming truck has occurred; nonetheless, the Atlas Project has made great progress.

According to this report, the schedule is pretty well set for the new light-duty Cummins to meet the aggressive U.S. Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards. From the looks of it (this test model was mated to a ZF eight-speed transmission - the one also on 2013 Ram 1500s), it won't have any problems meeting the half-ton-truck holy grail fuel economy number of 30 mpg highway. Numbers from this DOE report have the engine ratings at 210 horsepower and 385 pounds-feet of torque with a combined fuel economy rating (DOE testing) of 26.1 mpg.

From the timeline, it looks like the next demonstration of the Cummins engine will be this summer with a T2B5-compliant (meaning less clean than T2B2) dyno test, then a T2B5 test inside the Titan for extensive driving feedback and a final T2B2 test in the Titan in late summer 2014, right around the time the we should be seeing the redesigned 2015 Nissan Titan.

Coincidence? We think not. Additionally, we fully expect the new Cummins engine to make its way into full-size NV vans as well, which will be due for a remodel right around the same time. We'll have more about this new Cummins in the future.

Nissan Cummins specs II

 

Nissan Cummins 2.8L II

Comments

JeffS.: I have a different way of looking at what you say about the gov. and the price of oil, and that is when there is a friendly admin. in office, the price of oil is if not low, not crazy, but when you have an admin. like the one we have now here in America, the price of oil is high, because of the effect the laws, and rules of drilling and lic. are in effect controled by those in charge of the gov. and it is NOT the poeple! and the biggest effect on price, in any Country is the taxes said gov. puts on the gal. of gas/diesel fuel, which is more than the profits the oil co. make on refining the crude oil into gas/diesel fuel, the only reason the oil co. do seem to make very large amount of $$$ is because of the volume of gallons that they do refine, and the fact that we as a society need the fuel for every day life, it is not a luxury, but a necessity to get through the every day things we all must do, why have they all forgotten this? and the reason gas/diesel fuel is so much more in other parts of the world? do you all think your "free" health care is free? yes there are market forces, but there are gov. controls, that are an unintended consequence, or maybe not!

I think Ram shoulda got this.......

@sandman4X4
You know, its very frustrating in all countries to survive. What you describe isn't just in the US.

The US has been luckier than most countries up until now. Oil and most commodities have been traded in USD. What this has done is provided the US with a stable cost of these commodities than the rest of the world.

As the US becomes a smaller overall percentage of the global economy the cost fluctuations of commodities will impact your country more. Australia has lived with huge cyclical swings in our currency. Interest rates in Australia, fuel prices etc have much larger swings than in the US.

The US has had its golden age, but its by no means done and dusted. Its just now its more competitive for your country and this will make areas of living different.

You will be far from broke, just you will have to bite the bullet and wait for things to improve.

Its always easy to find someone to blame, but is it the government (GOP or Dems) or what people have expected from government?

The US is currently undergoing an energy boom of sorts, but you will pay global prices for this energy. If the government tries and makes it cheaper the companies will export it overseas and not sell it at home.

That's why the Eurozone was set up so the US didn't have the dominance it had controlling world trade. Now the Chinese are up there with the Eurozone and US with influence and growing stronger quickly.

That's why I write some of the stuff I write, because we live in a different world and see it through different lenses.

Things will work out okay, but it will be different and that's the part, the unknown that leave some a little fearful. Just read the crap in this article about diesel.

People fear the unknown, like who would have imagined a 4 cyclinder 2.8 litre full size pickup a decade ago or even thought it would have been credible 5 years ago?

As vehicles use less fuel you, the people will expect well maintained roads. Who is going to pay when the government recieves less fuel tax income?

I don't disagree about wasted tax dollars, but who do you vote for then?

LOL at all the people whining about the "low output" of this Cummins diesel.

For crying out loud...this thing is at 385 lb/ft AT 1,800 RPMs!! I've owned a small diesel like this and I can assure you it will out-tow a V8 powered pickup any day of the week.

This engine has MORE usable torque than a V8, with half the cylinders, and drastically higher fuel economy. What are you people thinking?

30 years ago 385 lb/ft at 1,800 RPM was impossible to purchase, even in a 1-ton pickup much less a 1/2 ton. The big block V8s didn't even make this kind of torque between 1,500 and 2,000...and they got 9 MPGs on a good day.

There is nothing to complain about here. Diesel is the obvious choice for trucks and it's a shame that our EPA has thus far prevented a perfect thing from happening to our trucks.

I'd like to know more about this Sonata. For it to outperform a Sierra Denali in traffic like this speaks volumes about how underrated that 170 hp engine must be. I also wonder why Hyundaii isn't marketing this model with other pickups. Evidently it must be able to run the 1/4 mile in mid to low 14s. Very impressive. I'm curious to know what the reliability and longevity is on this vehicle should you haul or tow on a routine basis. Good stuff!

I just want to know how much the option will cost. I didn't go for a diesel the last time because of the $7k premium.

@AJ, Papa.... whatever name you want to pick... if you can learn to read (it will take time), you will find somewhere where I wrote that I have a truck for pulling. I wasn't driving it yesterday because like the Denali driver, I wasn't towing. :) So your straw man argument "but you can't tow with your Sonata" really is lame. Let's see what else you can come up with and what your next user name will be!

@WXman, you are absolutely correct, this engine should be a complete winner. Torque is king in trucks.

Like them or not Diesels are coming. The biggest factor is meeting EPA MPG requirments for light duty trucks. It would be very hard to do with full size gassers. The smaller 4 and 6 cylinder diesels should not as expensize as what you see in the heavy duty pickups. The rest of the world has been using diesels for years and America is finally realizing thier potential in smaller 1/2 ton trucks, SUV's, and cars.

Can someone delete the spam comment by "quickbooks pos"?

@alex, alexa, alexis I've been Papa Jim for over 40 years. I never met AJ but he evidently has low regard for your pathetic posts, too. I started off friendly with you but YOU are the one that ran your big mouth about somebody needing a clinical psychiatrist. My best advice to you about trucks and cars will be to avoid slamming on the brakes--you might get REAR ENDED. Especially in Key West.

To all the diesel 'nay-sayers',don't buy one.The diesel game has never been about horsepower,so if that is how you judge a truck's worth a diesel will never make you happy.Perhaps a new Corvette would make you happier,once your old enough for a license that is.

@Papa, you have been PapaJim for 40 years on a website that has been around for 18 years? Incredible! Your post was friendly? You cannot be serious?! I wouldn't have cared if the Denali had rear-ended me, he would have been at fault! I nudged the brakes because I knew he wasn't willing to hit me! I said psychologist, not psychiatrist - the difference being that the psychologist conducts the WISC, which is an intelligence test for children. It was a joke. Sorry. You're right though, I could have and should have been more respectful.

@ToxicSludge, well said!

This seems to be inferior to the VM 3.0 diesel going to the Ram 1500 in virtually every way. Am I missing something here as to the advantages that this cummins has over the VM 3.0?

@sandman4X4--That is one factor but another is the declining refinery capacity. A new major refinery has not been built since the mid 70s. Oil drilling has actually expanded in recent years, but much is being exported as refined product. The price of oil is also effected by the value of the US dollar, if the dollar falls in value then the price of oil goes up. There are a lot of factors that influence the price of oil, but the major factor is supply and demand.

As for taxes the federal excise tax has not been raised since 1993 and it is about 18 to 19 cents a gallon. Sure there is state tax as well but if you took all taxes off it would probably not lower the price. Oil companies like Exxon Mobil are making record profits. I am not saying that political forces have no effect, what I am saying that most of the price of oil is influenced by increased demand from the developing world that is growing economically stronger and there is much more demand for energy. The end of last year the US for the first time in decades became a net exporter of finished petroleum products. It is a cop out to just blame the present administration entirely for the increase in oil prices.

Also sandman 4x4--The cost of production of oil has gone up because most of the easily attainable oil has been produced. The larger oil reserves are mostly offshore in the deeper waters which requires semi submersible drilling rigs which are much more expensive to build and operate. Most of the drilling rigs are contracted out by the oil companies and the demand for drilling rigs is much greater than the supply. I am very knowledgeable about the oil business after working in the drilling, production, and the refining end for years. It is much easier to oversimplify the increased cost of energy by blaming the President or blaming Congress, yes they do have some influence on energy prices but not as much as you would think. If you want to blame Washington it would be more accurate to blame them for rising deficits and gridlock which effects the value of our dollar which in turn effects all the prices we pay. It is much easier to point fingers and blame someone at a problem and blame someone than it is to really look at what is going on in the World around us. We all have to adapt and change, and some of the changes will be for the better and some will not.

JeffS: everything you just said, (in so many words) is exactly what I said, in not so many!

@ phillyguy: The Cummins in question is smaller in displacement,and has 2 less cylinders.385 ft.lbs.of torque is monstrous from a 4 banger,lol.Think of this,an add-on tuner could easily boost that up to 400 or better.Gives ya something to look forward too.Also,the GM 5.3L V8 for the 2013 my is only 335 ft.lbs.of twist.Yeah..... ;}>

Ok well that is good. Also Big Al's comments are accurate as well.

@Alex - perhaps you should of referenced/quoted the DSM - IV ;)

Diesels cause cancer?
Would that be Old diesels? New diesels? Fine Particulate?Carbon Monoxide? Benzene exposure? Most cancer specialists reference benzene exposure.
Most European countries have cancer rates similar or lower to the USA.

Fear and paranoia are interesting human behaviors based on our "rational side" trying to apply our primitive hardwired processes to modern life. Politicians, corporations, PR hack etc play up these fears for their own gain. So do bloggers.

If it has a 40% improvement of mpg over a gasser, it would be rather easy to calculate the point of return on investment. Diesels tend to have better resale. How simple or complex is a person going to get when looking at cost/benefit ratio's? Any personal use vehicle is a hole on wheels that you pour money into.
If my work commute was longer, I'd consider a baby diesel. My 10 minute commute isn't long enough to warm up a gasser let alone a diesel.

I do find some irony in the fact that one will have to purchase a Nissan to get a Cummins diesel in a 1/2 ton.
Will Fiat move the Cummins out the door and replace it wirth a Iveco sourced engine? Internet sources indicate that there was shared research on the big Cummins and it is close in architecture to the Cummins.
Fiat is already planning to use excess European capacity to meet demand in the colonies.

Looks like Dr. Howard needs to pull off the gas mask so he can get some more oxygen to the brain....seems to be starved of rational thoughts.

I'm definitely interested in a smaller efficent diesel in my next truck. Most people imply that it would be too expensive engine option and it would take a long time to start paying of.

Lets say a small diesel engine option is $2500. I would be perfectly fine to drop down one trim level to have a truck capable of 26nampg combined instead of 18. An example, I would rather get SR5 diesel Tacoma over a TRD gas Tacoma, or an XLT diesel F150 over gas FX4 F150 for the same money. You get the point. I abosolutely understand this logic would not work for everyone. Not everyone wants to compromise, but I still bet there would be many that would be ok with that as fuel economy is a big factor. After all, even the base models these days have same or better options and safety features as high end trims did not that long ago.

this post is really nice , you share this that why we learn like this . I am an ordinary Accessory Designer and I am thankful to you for this kind of informative post.
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Seems disappointing.
Take the 6.7 I6 Cummins.
Remove one cylinder, and reduce the stroke. 5.0 I5 [add balance weights if necessary]
300hp, 600ft-lbs as the floor, 350hp, 700ft-lbs as the ceiling.

@ GeorgeC: There's a huge difference in the block between the Cummins I6 for the ram,even if you take out one cyl,it's still too big.The smaller Cummins I4,and the VM Motori V6 where designed from the start for smaller vehicles.But,just because they are smaller in size they are still built very strong.Weight has to be a consideration in all of the design process.I had the 2.8L VM Motori CRD in my 06 Liberty Limited.The vehicle was a POS but that engine and 5 spd auto was way awesome.I wish I would have kept the engine/trans and burned the rest,lol.

@VMax 100% correct. to get 385lbs at just off idle is a lo better for towing than more much further up the rev range.

does this proposed engine use SCR? If it is getting the power and MPG's without SCR then I can see where the price point might undercut the VM 3.0 and make it a lot more feasible option. It might be down on power compared to the VM but if it is $2500 and not $4500 it will make a difference.

Mazda went to low compression (low for diesel) in order to use aluminum instead of CGI which saved both weight at costs. Since the compression was lower they were able to use less expensive internal components and tune the optimum burn so no SCR on their 2.2 L motor. Maybe this though process can be applied to the 2.8 Cummins or the VM 3.0? It would certainly fit the mantra of wanting to get trucks down in mass.

The VM Motori 3.0L uses DEF,and has a Dpf.I don't know about the Cummins for the Nissan.

@Lou--A 10 minute commute would not be enough to warm the engine up. I usually drive 10 minutes to catch the bus to work. For longer commutes, especially out on the interstate a diesel would be ideal and for hauling heavy loads.

This engine is a Cummins ISF, from what I'm reading global production looks to be from China.

The ISF can come up to 3.8 litres. Looking at the Nissan power and torque figures a 3.8 should be able to produce 300hp and over 500ftlb of torque.

This should be able to be used as a cheaper entry level engine in a HD.

Some food for thought.

http://www.primemovermag.com.au/products/item/cummins-isf-engine

This is a great combination. The Cummins Engine will probably be bulletproof. The Nissan Titan will last long enough to wear out the engine.

As a former owner of full size Dodge, Ford and Nissan trucks, it has been my experience that the Nissan is by far the best vehicle.

@ToxicSludge
I have the Ford 5 cylinder 3.2 Duratorqe in my Mazda BT50.

In our version of the 3.2 we are putting out slightly less than this Cummins.

I would like to see what the US version of my engine is capable of, but I don't think we'll get it here. It will not meet Euro V or VI.

I can buy a chip from Germany for a few hundred and bump my power up to 250hp and 440ftlb of torque. There is supposed to be another chip floating around to give more, but I can't find it.

Just plug the module in, but this will reduce my current fuel economy.

One day you will see even smaller diesels able to be used in your half ton pickups. I can see 2.2 diesels becoming viable within a few years.

Imagine a 2.2 4 cylinder in a full sizer? The world is an amazing place.

Is the Nissan truck just a test mule or an actual pre-production unit? If its just a mule, anyone could sign a contract with Cummins for this engine.

@ Big Al from Oz: I have been looking forward to a diesel 1/2 ton for decades.I would gladly 'settle' for the 2.8L @ 385 ft.lbs.All that at low rpm's is golden for me.I would also be interested in a mid-size diesel as well.I had a VM Motori 2.8L crd in my 06 libby.The vehicle sucked,but the engine trans combo was outstanding.I'm not interested in chips or programmers for my vehicles,that would be especially true for a diesel.I don't need the extra power so for me would be a waste of money.I'm in my 60's so hot rodding a truck doesn't get it for me,lol.

@Lou
From what I'm reading this engine will be the light duty diesel of choice for the Chinese vehicle manufacturers.

This engine also comes are marine variants etc and from the link I posted a "truck" engine, where torque and power come in at lower rpm is available.

I would think this is for sale by Cummins to whoever wants it. They spent big building a factory in Beijing just to manufacture it.

The Fiat/Chrysler Cummins relationship doesn't appear to be very strong. Cummins might need another outlet.

Also when Ram and Nissan were looking to partner for a 1/2 ton pickup they were looking at this Cummins. But Fiat came along with the VM V6.

Like I said maybe the 4 cylinder 3.8 could be used in a Ram HD as a cheap entry level vehicle. Imagine a 4 cylinder HD?

If Nissan are using this then the GM 2.8 diesel could be an option for the GMC's and Chev's.

The V6 diesels are quite attractive but expensive compared to the 4 cylinder diesels. I mentioned this a year ago about the diesels for 1/2 ton pickups concerning costs.

Alex: Poser? I my daily driver is a 2012 tuned, deleted Superduty. My wife drives a livernois tuned 2011 ecoboost and we just bought a 2013 Ram Express (Soon to be boosted since they now have broken the encryption to program them). All 3 will do work, both Ford's I assure you are fast (even compared to a Sonata) and the Ram will soon be. I would have bought a half ton diesel if it was available when we bought the Ram.
P.S. ever hear of the F150 lightning or Dodge SRT 10? Both are V8 gassers that will outrun most of those sprightly Hyundai's....

@ BigAl: Are you sure tuning would reduce your fuel economy? I have owned several Superduty's and they all returned better fuel economy loaded and empty after being tuned.

@Toxic Sludge
One of the guys at work has a long wheel base 4 door Wrangler with the 2.8 VM in it and he loves the engine, but not so much the vehicle. He getting about 25mpg at 75mph on the highway.

I'm finding that diesel average mpg is sort of equivalent to highway driving between 75-80mph. At work we were trying to work this one out.

The diesel tech here in Australia is advancing at a rapid pace. What you buy this year is old school within a couple of years.

It interesting some of the comments on this site regarding light diesels. The funny thing is not one has ever owned one.

I'm really old as well I'm in my early 50s:) I'm not going to chip my engine, it was just something to look at on the net.

Up where I live is more isolated than Alaska and you do cruise at very high speeds.

Maybe in Germany will people drive quicker. Overtaking a road train I will generally reach well over 100mph. The diesel does it effortlessly.

Porche and the Euro super car companies do high speed testing up here. I got photos the other day of a new Porche testing with no camoflague.

@Alton
Then you weren't using the extra power.

What did you do for your tuning.

If you just chip, you will require extra fuel to make those gains.

If you start changing intercooler, change boost pressure, bypass SCRs etc, then its possible.

I'm talking just inserting a new module.

@Big Al: Just deleted DPF and EGR, CAI, Larger free flowing exhaust and tuning from Spartan Diesel Technologies. I was going to add that the improved mileage was during normal driving. They also included a towing tune that did increase MPG and power output also, just not to the same extent as the hottest tune. If you get bored look Spartan up youtube videos of Spartan trucks. They can work magic with a Powerstroke.

No way, no how. If Nissan brings a diesel, it will be the Renault V6 hooked to a Jatco transmission. This DOE/Cummins nonsense is about as promising as the hydraulic assist being dallied about at EPA. Going nowhere.

@Toxic Sludge
One of the guys at work has a long wheel base 4 door Wrangler with the 2.8 VM in it and he loves the engine, but not so much the vehicle. He getting about 25mpg at 75mph on the highway.

I'm finding that diesel average mpg is sort of equivalent to highway driving between 75-80mph. At work we were trying to work this one out.

The diesel tech here in Australia is advancing at a rapid pace. What you buy this year is old school within a couple of years.

It interesting some of the comments on this site regarding light diesels. The funny thing is not one has ever owned one.

I'm really old as well I'm in my early 50s:) I'm not going to chip my engine, it was just something to look at on the net.

Up where I live is more isolated than Alaska and you do cruise at very high speeds.

Maybe in Germany will people drive quicker. Overtaking a road train I will generally reach well over 100mph. The diesel does it effortlessly.

Porche and the Euro super car companies do high speed testing up here. I got photos the other day of a new Porche testing with no camoflague.

@Toxic Sludge
One of the guys at work has a long wheel base 4 door Wrangler with the 2.8 VM in it and he loves the engine, but not so much the vehicle. He getting about 25mpg at 75mph on the highway.

I'm finding that diesel average mpg is sort of equivalent to highway driving between 75-80mph. At work we were trying to work this one out.

The diesel tech here in Australia is advancing at a rapid pace. What you buy this year is old school within a couple of years.

It interesting some of the comments on this site regarding light diesels. The funny thing is not one has ever owned one.

I'm really old as well I'm in my early 50s:) I'm not going to chip my engine, it was just something to look at on the net.

Up where I live is more isolated than Alaska and you do cruise at very high speeds.

Maybe in Germany will people drive quicker. Overtaking a road train I will generally reach well over 100mph. The diesel does it effortlessly.

Porche and the Euro super car companies do high speed testing up here. I got photos the other day of a new Porche testing with no camoflague.

@Toxic Sludge
One of the guys at work has a long wheel base 4 door Wrangler with the 2.8 VM in it and he loves the engine, but not so much the vehicle. He getting about 25mpg at 75mph on the highway.

I'm finding that diesel average mpg is sort of equivalent to highway driving between 75-80mph. At work we were trying to work this one out.

The diesel tech here in Australia is advancing at a rapid pace. What you buy this year is old school within a couple of years.

It interesting some of the comments on this site regarding light diesels. The funny thing is not one has ever owned one.

I'm really old as well I'm in my early 50s:) I'm not going to chip my engine, it was just something to look at on the net.

Up where I live is more isolated than Alaska and you do cruise at very high speeds.

Maybe in Germany will people drive quicker. Overtaking a road train I will generally reach well over 100mph. The diesel does it effortlessly.

Porche and the Euro super car companies do high speed testing up here. I got photos the other day of a new Porche testing with no camoflague.

@Toxic Sludge
One of the guys at work has a long wheel base 4 door Wrangler with the 2.8 VM in it and he loves the engine, but not so much the vehicle. He getting about 25mpg at 75mph on the highway.

I'm finding that diesel average mpg is sort of equivalent to highway driving between 75-80mph. At work we were trying to work this one out.

The diesel tech here in Australia is advancing at a rapid pace. What you buy this year is old school within a couple of years.

It interesting some of the comments on this site regarding light diesels. The funny thing is not one has ever owned one.

I'm really old as well I'm in my early 50s:) I'm not going to chip my engine, it was just something to look at on the net.

Up where I live is more isolated than Alaska and you do cruise at very high speeds.

Maybe in Germany will people drive quicker. Overtaking a road train I will generally reach well over 100mph. The diesel does it effortlessly.

Porche and the Euro super car companies do high speed testing up here. I got photos the other day of a new Porche testing with no camoflague.

Alex. I confess. My questions (as legitimate as they are) were mixed with some mockery.

But c'mon now...that is to be expected when you are insinuating that a 2002 Sonata (sedan) would be up for the same tasks as a Sierra Denali (a pickup). But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and say that I may have taken what you said out of context *or* that I have misinterpreted your intent in that post.

Honestly, it sounds like the Denali driver was being a jerk. Still, I guess I just don't see how the moral of that particular story (and we've all had similar idiot driver stories) is relevant to a discussion about diesel vs. gas engines.

I also think it's a bit silly for any of us to assume that we truly know what's best for others we don't even know...don't you? Especially on an anonymous message board.

As it has been said before, a diesel is not for everyone. Whether it's the initial cost, maintenance costs, fuel cost, or driving conditions, to each their own.

For most, a gas engine works just fine for most applications. What's great about trucks these days is that there are so many options and they are so versatile...some models more than others. A truck can do work, be luxurious, and be a thrill to drive...all-in-one! It all depends on what appeals to you and what you need.

This site is supposed to be for enjoyment and we're all adults here, right?

@ Big Al from Oz: I've been looking in on this site and reading articles for a long time.I just didn't post because it read like a childrens corner most of the time.Most of the diesel comments on this site sounds very much like complete ignorance of the subject material.That's too bad as there is talent here with years of experience that I find educational and a delight to read.

I'm hoping that the oem's don't get greedy and put these new light duty diesels out of truck buyers budgets,mine included.I've waited for a long time for this to finally come around and I am hoping all players have success.I see diesels as our best bet for alternative fuels,IE: Bio-diesel,and specifically B50 or better.Bio diesel burns cleaner then ulsd,lubes better,and keeps the fuel system very clean.Much better then E-anything,and doesn't require food crops to make either.These are exciting times coming up.

@ToxicSludge
I know a guy who goes around to the fast food joints and collects the oils and processes it to run in his diesel. It an older diesel but its costing him next nothing to run.

He has the setup in his shed and it isn't large. Quite interesting. He spends a day or so a month doing it, I think its like a hobby for him.

In the tropics around here people are using straight coconut oil to run older landcruisers on, you should be able to find out about that on the net. In colder areas the coconut oil solidifies.

I just made a post and it is no longer on the site.

@AJ, fair enough, I was just pointing out the irrelevance of power in a truck compared to torque. Even if the Sierra is really good at 0-60, which I am sure it is, accelerating from 70+ on the highway is another story. I notice the same thing in my F150. It launches decent off the line, but step on it at speed and it's pretty lame. The mass and crappy aerodynamics just do not like high speed. A car, on the other hand, is less resistant at speed, which is why it takes less energy (power) to do it.

So why is this relevant to this gas vs diesel discussion? Because people who don't have much experience with diesel, especially small diesels have a belief that they are too slow, compared to gas engines. That's understandable as the horsepower numbers are much lower. If we were having this conversation 10 years ago, they would be correct. Diesels were noisy and gutless. But that was then, and this is now. Now we have common rail injection. For example, take a look at the Jeep Australia website. The 3.0 CRD Grand Cherokee accelerates quicker than the 5.7 Hemi! How is that possible? They both weight pretty much the same, and the Hemi puts out more power! The extra torque of the diesel overcomes the resistance better than the Hemi! Also, if you want to get to your destination quicker, you're better off in the truck that doesn't require refueling as much!

You're right though, despite all that, not everyone will take the opt for the diesel and that is fine. But it is better to make an educated decision than an uninformed one! I suspect the fear is based more on perception than reality.



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