Ram Farms Its Country Music, Agriculture Connections

IMG_7919a II

At the Academy of Country Music's second annual Party for a Cause Festival in Las Vegas this past weekend, Ram sponsored a huge outdoor lifestyle show to celebrate all things related to country music. The event was a warm-up for the "ACM Awards" show (which aired April 6), with the big draws being multiple live music acts, the ACM Expo, real bullriding and mountains of barbecue.

We caught up with Marissa Hunter, global advertising director for Chrysler and head of the Ram Truck brand; she gave us a tour of the 25,000-square-foot Ram 1500 ride and drive area where anyone who could sign their name and answer a few questions could get a test drive over some short-track obstacles.

"We should be getting somewhere around 30,000 people attending this event over the four days we're here, and close to 2,500 people getting into one of our new Ram 1500s," Hunter said. "We find out what they think about our Rams before they get in the seats, then we ask them what they think after they get out … and if anyone wants more information, they can get info about dealers too."

She went on to explain that Ram's partnership with the "ACM Awards" dovetails nicely with Ram's plan to make connections with truck buyers who appreciate the benefits that a bed, payload and towing capacity can provide. "It must be working, because we just had one of our best months in almost a decade," she said, referring to the fact that Ram outsold the Chevrolet Silverado by some 285 units in March.

 

IMG_7923a II

 

"We're a fighter brand, so we're going to keep pushing to our strengths with more exposure and more partnerships that make sense to our buyers," Hunter continued. Ram certainly got a lot of exposure last year in the Super Bowl when the "Year of the Farmer" ad debuted to both critical and industry buzz success.

"Our latest promotion is called 'The Next Crop Project,' where more than 100 of our dealerships will partner with the national organization of the Future Farmers of America — and for every Ram test drive that happens on April 26, we'll be donating $20 to the local [FFA] clubs," Hunter said. The program is designed to raise awareness for the almost 90-year-old youth organization while at the same time supporting the farming industry, she said.

Whether this type of program will help Ram continue to beat Chevy Silverado sales in the months to come remains to be seen, but here's the 30-second commercial (below) Ram debuted during the "ACM Awards" to announce the program.

To download the full press release, click here.

Images by Mark Williams, Cars.com

 

IMG_7935a II

 

 

Comments

“He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.”
― Benjamin Franklin

@Smoke5
@All1
Here is my prove.

Even Your Golf you where referring to calls it "The Multilink Rear Axle." No drive lines !!!

Or
"The much improved suspension-strut-type front axle"


http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

Now what.

@RamTruckGuy

Actually I did touch on handling in one of my posts in this article....


"On paper, the specs of my F150 is better all the way around from frame, brakes, engine power and the such that my old 99 Ram 2500 Cummins automatic. The only area it is lacking is the rear axle, but they are also rated at different payloads. In the real world, my F150 will out tow, out stop, and are just about equal on handling the load. So yes, you can say what you want about "on paper" or "real world" of the F150 or other makes, but I actually have experience with the two."

I never here any of you guys say my old 99 Ram 2500 shouldn't pull 10,000lbs. So why do you say a truck with better specs couldn't?

@zviera

-Facepalm-

@All1
That's what I did already. Didn't help. I guess you don't have an answer. You know to talk just about F150 Solid Rear axle with leaf spring payload. I was hoping to get some answer from you. Well, I gave up.

Are we going to stop saying half tons on PUTC? I guess from now on we will call trucks like the Ecoboost F-150 class 2 and go by GVWR http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truck_classification and http://www.ford.com/trucks/f150/specifications/payload/ and 5.7L Tundra http://www.toyota.com/tundra/features.html#!/weights_capacities/8378/8363/8261/8276. Not trying to be funny but is that what were doing now? If so what are the GVWR's of the different Ram 1500's?

In theory, the 1999 Dodge Ram 2500 should have stiffer rear leaf springs than a current F-150. I cannot back up this claim without obviously having the actual spring rates, though. Provided that I am correct on the assumption, this means the 1999 Ram 2500 would have greater rear roll stiffness; hence, would better manage the payload weight transfer (by slowing down the rate at which the weight transfers laterally in the rear) than the F-150 from a handling perspective...even if both were loaded with the same amount of weight. Why do you think RAM went to a 3-link front suspension on their 2500 and 3500 trucks? Greater roll stiffness in the front (whether it is done via a bigger front stabilizer bar, higher front spring rates, or stiffer suspension architecture) promotes understeer and less roll angle; hence, allows for greater payload capacities. Greater roll stiffness in the rear of a vehicle (bigger rear stabilizer bar if equipped, stiffer rear springs) slows down the weight transfer across the axle; thereby, makes the rear of the vehicle less snappy, and again reduces the amount of roll. The negative of too much rear roll stiffness; however, is that the rear tires will give up grip long before the rear suspension, in turn promoting oversteer...it's all a delicate balance...

@Smoke5
@All1
Here is my prove.

Even Your Golf you where referring to calls it "The Multilink Rear Axle." No drive lines !!!

Or
"The much improved suspension-strut-type front axle"


http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

" No drivelines" I meant, it doesn't have any drivetrain of yours and your VW Golf calls it "The Multilink Rear AXLE."
Exactly like I said we all call it in there.

Now what !

@zviera

The Ram 1500 has a solid rear axle just like the F150. The only thing different is the suspension between the two. Ram uses a multi-link coil suspension and Ford uses "archaic" leaf springs as you put. The front suspension are basically the same in both trucks but Ram chooses to name things for marketing purposes.

Although I do find it funny that when it come to things like your Ram's V8 engine and your 5 speed transmission, you call them proven over any new technology. Yet you it come to something new on a Ram you call everything else old? That just cracks me up.

Seriously guy, learn something, and stop trying to say you are proving us wrong on stuff you know nothing about.

@RamTruckGuy

The Ram 2500 was stiffer than my current F150 and there is no doubt about that. However, that does not mean my current F150 does not handle the weight. Both controlled back end bounce very well and the F150 actually controlled side to side movement better to to it's shock placement and trailer sway control.

I understand that going by Ram's specs my truck shouldn't tow what it does, but you see Ford or any other manufacturer does not go by Ram's specs or what kind of abilities you think a "half ton" should. Stop thinking of it as a "half ton" and more of a model of truck that is different then your's with different specs.

@AD - (this comment is not aimed at you) if people stopped being childish and blinded by fanboy coolaid, then we would all know that 1/2 ton is just a grouping of trucks in a class with a broad range of capacities.

@AD


I am not saying not to use the terms. What I am saying is not to be a used a term as if all "half tons" are the same and are only limited to what people think what a "half ton" should be capable of. It should only be used as a reference and not a classification. It is just like when the 2007 Tundra came out. It broke all the molds and specs of how we looked at what we called "half tons". It was that truck that forced the other makes to up the ante on what consumers consider as a "half ton". I would have figured you of all people would understand what I am trying to say.

@All1 - best to ignore the Rambo Motard Sheep Herder's tribe. All they want to do is string you along.

Nothing you say will change their minds.

- They will BS the "buy a 3/4 ton instead of 1/2 ton" party line in relation to 1/2 tons

- They will say 30,000 is fine in a 1 ton even though it is 15 tons

- they will deride Japanese badges even though their truck is just as foreign

- they will bring up safety recalls of every OTHER brand forgetting/omitting their own.

Go on the premise that they are not worth the reply because they aren't.

Keep your posts for those of us who actually want to learn.

@ ALL1: I have not once used the "half-ton," "3/4 ton" monikers. All this time I've been referring to the vehicles by their model designation. I realize that these designations are antiquated and outdated terminology.

How does Ford's Trailer Sway Control relate to payload capability at all? All the Trailer Sway Control does is apply the brakes on the trailer to stop a sway condition. Trailer Sway Control is not needed if someone actually takes the time to get their tongue weight set up correctly. Even then, the RAM trailer brake system also has a trailer sway mitigating feature. They just don't market the living daylights out of it like Ford does.

Lou, I sure hope you're not pointing fingers in my direction.

Main point of all of this is that why doesn't ram offer an option for more payload like airbags or simply a different spring set. Neither is very expensive. In fact I bet both are available aftermarket and Ram 1500 owners install the items themselves to make the truck perform like the others. Is there some reason the chassis cant handle the extra weight? Payload under 1000lbs is rediculous on a full sized truck. Period.

RamTruckGuy - How is it any different for a HD pickup to tow near it's limits than it is for a light duty? In fact I dare say it would be more hazardous using your own logic. My max tow rating is only like 3000lbs more than my truck weighs. Yet using Ram HD 3500 as an example, the trailer can weigh more than 20000lbs more than the truck, but thats ok?

FWIW there are disclaimers everywhere in the owners manual on any pickup stating that it will perform different when loaded up or towing. Shocks and spring technology have come a long way since 1999 BTW. Stiffer unloaded does not mean it will handle a payload better. It just means there are noprogressive rate on the springs, regardless if coil or flat. A 2014 HD will ride softer unloaded than a 1999 HD too. Does that mean it must be less capable than the 1999 loaded?

@All1
I know that. I am not arguing about that. I know exactly how it's made designed and installed. I am going to install Air ride soon, because It's easy to do on RAM thanks to the Multilink Rear axle.

http://www.truckspring.com/products/Firestone-Coil-to-Air-Conversion-System__RR2518.aspx

I am just saying we call everything an axle.
Even VW does and rear one doesn't have any "drivetrain" of Smoke05.

@zviera

"Now try to order RAM front axle. What you get"

http://www.mopar.com/ram/1500/2013/shop/354661/170/4131/

You get a front axle without links...... Suspension is in another category by itself.

I don't see any differential and drive line at VW Golf Multilink Rear Axle, like you were saying in here in your link.
In fact it's completely missing and they call it Multilink Rear AXLE.

http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

Can you explain that please? Or you are going to spin it to F150 payload capacity? Please don't.

@All1
"Although I do find it funny that when it come to things like your Ram's V8 engine and your 5 speed transmission, you call them proven over any new technology. Yet you it come to something new on a Ram you call everything else old? That just cracks me up"

HEMI in RAM1500 has completely new design with VVT, MDS... and it's not 100 years old like your Rear Axle with Leaf Suspension.

@RAM fans

It's a bloody riot watching the Ram boys all moving off the April 8 story about Ram Commercial.

Once they figured out that RAM only hit its sales number in March via Fleet sales they moved back to Monday's story about RAM on the farm or something that Ram's advertising guys dreamed up.

I get the feeling you don't tow much more than a small utility trailer RamTruckGuy. You can still have sway despite setting tongue weight. Ever wonder why hitch compnaies make antisway devices? I am sure if you read an owners manual it even states that the built in sway control is to suppliment other methods, not replace them. Also it is not always possible to get ideal tongueweight, especially in a travel trailer. SOme by design are tongue heavy or tongue light. Pulling a decent trailer from the bumper and having a speeding semi pass can cause a small sway event, same with cross winds. Remember a travel trailer or large enclosed cargo trailer are hige boxes that can act like a sail. Tongue weight adjustments dont do much if wind hitting the sides is causing the instability. That's where the brake control sway control is nice. It adds to what you have and make towing safer and more enjoyable.

@papa jim
Any source please?

Lou, I sure hope you're not pointing fingers in my direction.
Posted by: RamTruckGuy | Apr 8, 2014 1:48:04 PM


It must be you, because it's definitely not me. LOL.

@ Smoke: Load leveling via air springs isn't necessarily the best option. I will admit that, despite RAM having their air suspensions. All that you're doing when maintaining the same ride height when loaded is creating a higher CG, and higher roll center height which in turn makes handling performance worse if you do not compensate accordingly. A vehicle squatting under load is actually a good thing.

As far as the 3500 and the claimed trailer weight it can handle - - the truck has dual rear wheels, afterall. The dual rear wheels do in fact enhance the stability of the vehicle. In addition, with the load of the trailer being on a gooseneck or fifth wheel, you're putting the majority of the load over the rear axle. This has a minimal impact on the front axle weight. On the contrary, a tag trailer with too much tongue weight will drastically reduce the amount of weight on your front axle. This in turn causes handling issues in the form of wander, trailer sway, etc. This is where ensuring a proper tongue weight is crucial.

On the subject of spring technology coming a long way that you bring up, the leaf springs that are on a 1999 RAM 2500 not being progressive does not hold water, and leaf springs have not changed a whole lot since the 1950s. First, as you compress the leaf spring, it does indeed get stiffer. It is not as linear as you may think. First, this occurs by means of the friction between the leafs as they contact one another. Second, there is indeed a secondary leaf, a load bearing spring if you will, on the bottom of the leaf pack...usually you see it as being flat. As you compress the spring, the bottom of the main pack increases in contact with this spring; thereby, driving up the effective rate of the spring. Some leaf sprung 3500s even have a third rate leaf spring, an auxillary spring on top of the leaf pack, that makes contact with pads that protrude from the frame for even more load bearing capability.

Also, the 2014 2500 HD rides softer than the older leaf spring trucks because it uses a multi-rate coil spring. At an un-loaded state the rate is significantly lower; thus, improving ride. The same basic concept is used on air suspension, except a coil spring will still sag under load like a conventional leaf spring.

"Thanks to the multilink axle (FOUR-LINK SUSPENSION), handling and driving comfort have been decisively improved. Active safety also benefits from the new axle configuration. As inclined dampers with oval auxiliary springs are also used in the new Golf, the through-loading width in the luggage compartment has been enlarged."

That is from your link zviera. Thy are referring to axle as how the wheel is mounted to the car. Once again. Refer to the definition of axle I posted. A shaft that connects one or 2 wheels......

Of course there is no drive components on a Golf rear. It is front wheel drive. The front axles are the spindles and halfshafts that are guess what? Part of the drive train that connect the wheels to the differential. Axle location refers to where the wheels are mounted to the chassis. A few places they state axle, then specifically mention suspension components as well. Nice try on the Google search tho.

@ Smoke: Trailer sway will damp out on its own relatively quickly without the aid of any sway countermeasures or electronic nannies if you have a proper tongue weight. This is a requirement of J2807, afterall.

RamTruckGuy - Dually or not my comparison is still valid. The SRW 3500's are still rated for far more than 3-4000lbs above their curb weight.

You need to look up what a progressive rate spring is. I promise you that a 1999 leaf spring pack is not the same as a 2014. Different blocks, different lengths, different thicknesses, varied mounting.... I am well aware of overload leafs, however if the ride was so stiff on the 1999 Ram though it was likely due to the springs being stiff to start with. A stiff unloaded ride does not mean a vehicle is safer or any better at load handling nor does a softer unloaded ride necessarily mean it is unsafe.

I was comparing apples to apples. 1999 leaf springs vs 2014 leaf springs.

@zviera did you read Mark Williams story today's date?

@lou

Yeah I know I should take your advice especially when it come to zviera. When he is backed into a wall because he knows the misinformation he is spewing is bull$hit, he starts getting worse at his fan boyish behavior. He then starts jumping to other things so he won't have to say that he was wrong with his assumptions. I will do my best and take your advice and just ignore the poor little guy and just chalk it up to him being so young as why he acts the way he does.

@ ALL1: Please refer to my post on handling and roll stiffness. A stiffer leaf spring will handle weight transfer better than a soft one when both are without a stabilizer bar.

@All1
Because you don't have an answer I am backed to the wall?
Riiiigghhht.

I will write it for you so even you can understand without spinning everything to payload.


RAM Rear Axle with Multi-Link suspension is superior to outdated 100 years old Hotchkiss leaf suspension rear axle on F150.
Like I said many times in this article, F150 has more payload.RAM has superior Rear Axle with Multi-Link Suspension.

Ram trucks built starting in 2009 use a multi-link coil-spring rear suspension for better ride and handling. The coil-spring setup centralizes and absorbs bumps and impacts, while reducing friction; it also weight 40 pounds less than a leaf-spring configuration (less unsprung mass = better, safer drive and forces handling) . For the 4x4, the Ram has a larger articulation range than its leaf-spring competitors, with less freeway hop.

Is it good enough for you fanboy?

The yahoo's have once again hijacked a thread. At least they are fvcking up a Ram thread. LOL

I am not bashing any brand or person but I am getting confused reading this. The debate over half tons, axles and suspensions. It seems like their is a comparison between chassis and different classes of trucks as I think their was a comparison between a Ram 2500 and an F-150.

@Lou
RAM Rear Axle with Multi-Link suspension is superior to outdated 100 years old Hotchkiss leaf suspension rear axle on F150.Like I said many times in this article, F150 has more payload.RAM has superior Rear Axle with Multi-Link Suspension.Ram trucks built starting in 2009 use a multi-link coil-spring rear suspension for better ride and handling. The coil-spring setup centralizes and absorbs bumps and impacts, while reducing friction; it also weight 40 pounds less than a leaf-spring configuration (less unsprung mass = better, safer drive and forces handling) . For the 4x4, the Ram has a larger articulation range than its leaf-spring competitors, with less freeway hop.

Take that! Lou.

@TRX4- both trucks I rented were 2013's. The GM was a 5.3 with 6 speed auto and the RAM a HEMI 6 auto. Renting a truck before buying is a good way to get to know the pros/cons more so than a rest drive. Will rent a 2014 GM and then decide which to buy.

@Smoke5
Nice try Smoke5

But your Golf picture and article clearly says

"The multilink rear axle"

Many times.

http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

A much-improved suspension-strut-type axle is used at the front and a newly developed multilink axle is used at the rear.

The multilink rear axle: combination of driving comfort and optimum handling.

The much improved suspension-strut-type front axle.

Numerous details optimise the tried-and-tested Gold FRONT AXLE. The most striking improvements on the FRONT AXLE are set out below.

Increase in agility and improvement in steering precision through:

- more direct steering ratio
- higher transversal axle rigidity under lateral force at the tyre contact point
- lower tendency to roll due to highly effective stabiliser bar connection.

Increase in rolling and driving comfort through:

- optimisation of oblique springing
- new mounting concept for the lower wishbone
- separate mounting of spring and damper on the suspension strut tower
- newly developed twin-sleeve shock absorber

So they call all the components include shocks FRONT AXLE or REAR AXLE like I did.
Surprise, surprise.

By ideally matching the optimised FRONT AXLE to the new MULTILINK REAR AXLE, Volkswagen has made a technical generation leap in the chassis field.

You don't even know, what components and axles are in your VW Golf GT.
Please call VW Germany to tell them it's not an AXLE they are talking about and stop blaming me to do the same thing.
I learned from the best. Not from you.

@Smoke5

Don't worry about what he says because quite frankly he is not the brightest bulb on the house. He likes to quote unrepeatable source like some dumb sh!t Volkswagen enthusiasts like they know what they are talking about when clearly they don't. His back is against the wall on something he clearly knows nothing about so he is throwing out every source that will help what he thinks is correct even though it isn't. One of these days he will know, but until then forgive him for his ignorance on the subject. We are all ignorant to something at some points in out live.

Although the next time you have a run in with him then show him that even Volkswagen calls it at multi-link SUSPENSION that have been put on CARS for a long time now( http://en.volkswagen.com/en/innovation-and-technology/technical-glossary/mehrlenker-hinterachse.html ) and this Volkswagen enthusiasts club link he keeps posting is from a bunch of dumb-tards that don't know any better which makes it like the blind is leading the blind. If that does not do then just show him the parts book for the 2013 Golf that calls out the parts in that link he likes to post as the REAR SUSPENSION( http://parts.vw.com/parts/2013/Volkswagen/Golf/Base/?siteid=9&vehicleid=391256&section=REAR%20SUSPENSION ) If that still don't help get that bulb of his a little brighter on the matter then I don't know what will. So don't worry about what he says, and don't let it get to you. Just do like I have taken up doing, ignoring him.


Also, you might want to tell him not to believe everything he sees on the internet.

@ Zviera -

"Thanks to the multilink axle (FOUR-LINK SUSPENSION), handling and driving comfort have been decisively improved. Active safety also benefits from the new axle configuration. As inclined dampers with oval auxiliary springs are also used in the new Golf, the through-loading width in the luggage compartment has been enlarged."

The above is cut and pasted from the link you posted. You keep conveniently leaving out the fact the author states suspension right after he states multilink axle.

All1

"Don't worry about what he says because quite frankly he is not the brightest bulb on the house. He likes to quote unrepeatable source like some dumb sh!t Volkswagen enthusiasts like they know what they are talking about when clearly they don't."

THIS IS VW PRESS RELEASE . NOT UNREPEATABLE SOURCE.

RIGHT ON THE TOP OF THE PAGE All1.

Below is the full Volkswagen AG press kit broken down into multiple sections with over 150 photos. 
The press release, while applicable to the Golf V in general, does contain model specific details for the German market, so expect some detail changes on North American specification models.

Golf V Part V: Chassis and ProductionGolf V Indepth - Chassis and Production
Sep 23, 2003
Source: Volkswagen AG 


http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

Call VW and leave your BS UNREPEATABLE SOURCE to yourself
fanboy.

@Smoke5

VW specify in their press release that Rear Axle (even without drivetrain) has 4 link suspension. Not 3 or 6. Just once in whole press release. Suspension is part of the axle. Not other way around.

VOLKSWAGEN calls all the components include shocks FRONT AXLE or REAR AXLE even without any "drivetrain "of yours.

VW calls it Multilink Axle many times in their Press Release.

My point is , VW calls whole assembly with shocks , all links , springs, hubs, bearings, brakes... .even without drivetrain AXLE , LIKE I DID. Everybody in Europe does.

If you knew the assembly proces, you would know, that this whole assembly is installed at once from the bottom and holds mostly by 4 mounting and rubber dampening bushings and bolts.That's why we call it AXLE even without drivetrain.

http://www.vwvortex.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=240

@Scott Hibbard: then it shouldn't be that much difference in squat. Like I said, 1/8 an inch, or was it 1/16? Wow, not much. So maybe with your 800 pounds (vs.650) sitting further forward, maybe a difference of a quarter inch?

It's funny, Edmunds tested Fords raising their tow ratings to top the Rams, just for the sake of bragging, when they did nothing different.

What Edmunds said WHEN TOWING, NOT EMPTY, was the Ford didn't control the trailer so well. Oh, it overheated, but that's off topic.

Then Four Wheeler Magizine compared Ram to Chevy v-6s, and said "we would buy a Chevy with air suspesion, but they don't have sell them" and that maybe they shoulda worked on their suspension.

@Ramtruckguy: It's funny you say leafs are better for going around turns with a load, the air suspension Ram in the 2013 light duty shootout had 1200 pounds I believe, in the bed, plus two adults. So maybe 1525, and it beat them all on the autocross. Yeah, a truck with less payload that was overweight won. A max payload Ford was second. I would say 1500 pounds for a 1500/f-150.

Come to think of it, the 30k shootout 4x2 Ram ran better with a load.

@Scott Hibbard:


http://special-reports.pickuptrucks.com/2011/09/30k-shootout-autocross-test.html


Looks like the Chevy didn't do so well.

Looks like the max payload Ford does poor when empty, yet respobds well to weight. The Chevy was average in both. The Tundra, despite them trying to markit it as overbuilt, went backwards.

Ram's times were best empty or full. My mistake on the weight, it was 1000 pounds payload.


http://special-reports.pickuptrucks.com/2013/06/2013-light-duty-challenge-autocross.html

@ TRX4Tom: I wasn't referring to a properly tuned air suspension system for load. I was responding to comments made where people were suggesting adding air springs to a vehicle that was not designed or tuned for them.

Understand that, my bad.



The comments to this entry are closed.