Top 10 Fastest-Selling Pickup Models for April 2014

2013 Tacoma II

Pickup truck manufacturers are clever. They don't mind letting us know how many pickup trucks they sell each month in total, but they don't offer us a breakdown of which specific models are selling better than others. That's why we never know exactly how many Ram 2500 Power Wagons, Ford F-150 SVT Raptors or Toyota Tacoma Access Cab four-cylinder 4x2s are sold in a given month. For that information, we typically have to go to third-party sources that charge a fee to get state-by-state and U.S. total sales numbers based on actual state registrations.

Thankfully, our sibling site Cars.com has access to some of that data, so we were able to pull out some interesting information about the fastest-selling vehicles for April.

These particular models and configurations have the fastest average selling times based on how long they typically sit on dealer lots. We set a threshold number of 250 vehicles that must sell in that given month (to make the list) so as to not skew the list to newly released vehicles that have strong pent-up demand. There are many 2015 Ford, Chevrolet and GMC heavy-duty pickups that sit on dealer lots less than two weeks, but the total sales number of those specific models aren't necissarily statistically significant.

Interestingly, the average number of days it took to sell an automobile this April was 56 days — once the vehicle was on the dealer lot. Last April, it was 51 days. Some of the slowest-selling vehicles in the U.S. this past month have been on dealer lots for as long as six months.

Here are the top 10 fastest-selling pickups for April 2014 and their average stay on lots:

  1. 2014 Toyota Tacoma crew cab, 16 days
  2. 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD crew cab, 17 days
  3. 2014 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali crew cab, 17 days
  4. 2014 Toyota Tacoma extended cab, 18 days
  5. 2014 Nissan Frontier crew cab, 21 days
  6. 2014 Toyota Tacoma regular cab, 25 days
  7. 2014 Toyota Tundra crew cab, 27 days
  8. 2014 Toyota Tundra extended cab, 41 days
  9. 2014 Ford F-150 regular cab, 42 days
  10. 2014 Ford F-150 extended cab, 47 days

Manufacturer image

 

Comments

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
Straight from the Ford site.

The Aussie ute is the 'father' of the F-150, not the Model T. The model T was like many other previous vehicles. Even in Europe they had similar vehicles to the Model T earlier.

So, now you are stating that the Europeans created the pickup?

Boy, you change your tune often DiM.

Remember Ford are the manufacturers of the F-150, with your current bout of 'episodes' I don't know if you are delirious.


Read this link and then apologise to me. Even Ford disagrees with you DiM.

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2014/02/25/ford-celebrates-aussie-ute-s-80th-anniversary.html

A 1907 pickup truck.

http://www.bartlett.com/graphics/early-1900s-truck.jpg

An early tanker.

http://www.petroleumhistory.org/OilHistory/images/trucks/crossett2.jpg

A photo from 1915.

http://americancityandcounty.com/blog/goodbye-horses-firefighters-trade-their-steeds-motors

A very, very old pickup, 1904 (according to DiM)

http://www.pacificcohistory.org/sw2000_2_12b.jpg

You see DiM, the pickup was invented, it was an idea, an evolutionary process that started with the humble Aussie ute.

@Big Al From OZ,
The Ute was the forerunner of what became the "civilized Pickup" Prior to the Ute, Pickups were very basic work vehicles here and in the US. The Ute showed they could be used as a comfortable car and a light truck. Still Pickups were behind and to a certain extent still are in the the comfort, handling , general safety stakes,

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

@DiM
You sometimes amaze me with your wealth of knowledge ;)

Did you know that the Egyptian Pyramids outdated the Model T?

So, show me a Model T that has the design philosophy of a current pickup ie, to drive to church on a Sunday and take the 'pigs' to the market on a Monday?

The ute was the base for the current pickup/ute vehicle.

There were many small trucks prior to the Model T as well and just like the Model T they were trucks.

Remember, you quoted this "Pickups are SUVs with a balcony". Sort of fits in well with a ute.

It seems the ute was sort of the beginning.

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Feb 25, 2014 | MELBOURNE

Ford celebrates Aussie ute’s 80th anniversary as the pioneer of the company’s global truck leadership


•Ford celebrates the 80th anniversary of its ute – the forerunner of modern pickup trucks – based on the first sale to a Melbourne-area farmer in February 1934
•A 23-year-old Ford Australia designer created the ute by listening to the farming family’s request for a vehicle with more utility
•Ford’s truck teams translate customer needs into innovations more than ever, including the all-new 2015 F-150 with high-strength, military-grade, aluminum alloys throughout the body
•Ford sold more than one million pickups globally in 2013 based on Ranger growth in Asia, F-Series’ 37th straight year as America’s best-selling truck and the “International Pick-Up Award 2013” in Europe



Ford is celebrating the 80th anniversary of its Australian invention of the iconic ute, which led to the development of vehicles such as the F-Series and Ranger and propelled the company to years of truck leadership.

Not only was it an Australian invention, but the concept has been exported to the world, reinterpreted by other manufacturers and gained a legion of fans everywhere.

The story of the first Ford ute is a key part of Ford’s rich heritage that has seen the development of such iconic vehicles as the F-Series.

Farming roots

Like all good ideas, the first integrated passenger-car based Ute was born out of necessity, very much like the first Model T Ford.

In mid-1933 the then managing director of the Ford Motor Company of Australia, Hubert French, received a letter from a farmer’s wife in Gippsland, Victoria.

She wrote: “My husband and I can’t afford a car and a truck but we need a car to go to church on Sunday and a truck to take the pigs to market on Monday. Can you help?” What the customer wanted was a vehicle with passenger car comfort but could also carry loads.

French passed the letter on to a young design engineer, Lewis (Lew) Bandt, who had joined the company only a few years previously as Ford’s only designer. Bandt was just 23 years old but was already showing a flair for design for which he was to become quite famous until he retired in 1975.

Bandt died in 1987, after being involved in an accident driving a restored version of the Utility he helped make famous.

Bandt’s take on the passenger car-based utility was considered revolutionary at the time. Until the early 1930s, many auto manufacturers and vehicle body builders had constructed wooden or metal ‘utility’ bodies on car chassis. Henry Ford’s Model T was a particular favourite and Ford T “Buckboards” and “Utility Runabouts” were to be found on farms and delivering goods in towns and cities throughout the world.

The ute is Born

Where Bandt’s design differed was that he developed his Ford utility as a coupe (two-passenger, steel-paneled, glass-windowed car) with an integrated steel-paneled load carrying section at the rear. What Bandt did was to blend the ‘pickup’ sides into a coupe body, which provided a cleaner profile and increased the load area behind the cabin.

Bandt sketched out his ute on a 10 metre blackboard, giving it a 545 kilogram (1200-pound) payload on a wheelbase of 2845 mm (9 feet, 4 inches).

He completed his original design in October, 1933, and quickly produced two prototypes for testing. By January 23, 1934, he had the final drawings and the new Ford ute went into production with Bandt christening his design a ‘coupe-utility’. When the first utes came off the production line in 1934 two were sent to Canada. The car even caught the eye of Henry Ford.

Bandt’s original full-scale blueprint drawings of the 1934 coupe utility are now archived in Australia and the rebuilt version of the Bandt coupe-utility is – appropriately – housed in a museum in the rural country Victorian town of Chewton, near Melbourne.

In its day, the Ford coupe-utility boasted a V8 engine and three-speed manual gearbox while its suspension was by transverse leaf springs with shock absorbers at the front and heavy duty semi-elliptic rear springs and shock absorbers at the rear.

The cabin was the same as the four-door Model 40 Ford five-window coupe. But, instead of the rear luggage compartment or ‘dicky seat’, Bandt added a wooden-framed utility section with steel outer panels welded to the coupe body to form a smooth-sided vehicle.

The result was quickly hailed as the ‘must have’ vehicle for the rural communities and 22,000 were sold between 1940 and 1954.

Lew Bandt’s daughter, Dr Ros Bandt said it was her father’s stunning foresight to marry beautiful design and on-the-ground practicality and make it available to all Ford customers.

“I can't imagine what it must have been like in this pressured war-torn time in the 1930s to have the vision to create an affordable Ute on the land to help with everyday tasks, both work and play and be able to connect over distance,” Dr Bandt said.

“Dad created a brilliant stylish workhorse, which is the legacy he has left to all farmers and owners who enjoy and depend on their utes worldwide. In his words; he wanted the farmer's wife and the pigs to have a glorious ride.”

Lewis Bandt’s coupe utility was a first for Ford Australia and his ingenuity had a great impact on the then developing Australia auto industry.

The original Bandt-designed Ford ute paved the way for what has morphed into what has become some of the world’s biggest selling vehicles – the Pickup or utility. It also spawned the Falcon ute, which has been a firm favourite with customers since the first Falcon XK ute was launched in 1961.

In total, Ford Australia has sold more than 455,000 Falcon utes, among the most popular being the Falcon XB, XF II, AU II, BA and current FG models.

The Australian designed and developed Ford Ranger is also widely sold in more than 180 different countries.

Global truck leadership

Ford sold more than one million trucks globally in 2013, building on the company’s truck leadership that includes:
•Ford pickups globally represent one out of every five pickups sold
•F-Series is the best-selling vehicle in the history of the pickup truck industry with more than 33 million trucks sold – twice as many as the No. 2 vehicle, the Model T (16.5 million)
•F-Series became the world’s best-selling truck in the United States for the 37th consecutive year and the best-selling vehicle in the country for the 32th straight year
•Ranger achieved best-ever sales and was Ford’s best-selling vehicle across the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 2013 and earned “International Pick-Up Award 2013” in Europe
•Ranger was the best-selling vehicle overall in Vietnam, saw sales rise 43 per cent in Thailand and is challenging to become New Zealand’s top-selling truck by overtaking Toyota HiLux in sales six months in the past two years


About Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 183,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit corporate.ford.com.


© 2014 The Ford Motor Company
All rights reserved


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Boy!

Someone really has their 'knickers' in a knot!

So the concept for a 'SUV with a balcony' is Australian.

I do know it goes against some paradigms. But history is history. You can't change that.

I do think Ford does know where and how their own products originate.

@Robert Ryan
Small trucks were around prior to the Model T, in most any country.

The concept of a vehicle that had car comfort and the utility of a light truck was a Ford idea, and some engineer in a small office in Ford Australia came up with this concept, actually a farmer's wife if the tale is true.

This idea is used this very day by many manufacturers globally.

Well your CAFE footprint, is sure killing pickups.

It's okay, in a decade when a fullsize has to be the size of a HD and costs are much higher due to the technologies/materials to keep them viable you can thank the UAW/Big 3/Government for taking such good care of you guys.

I told you so a while ago, but I'm anti-American, remember.

@Numpty
Well.

Lets see if you can break your record for multi-posting.

So, you don't want anyone to read this link straight from Dearborn.


https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2014/02/25/ford-celebrates-aussie-ute-s-80th-anniversary.html

Are you disillusioned now? Well, I don't think Ford would lie about it's products.

Here's something that will even disillusion you even more. Apple pie is English not American.

"English apple pie recipes go back to the time of Chaucer. The 1381 recipe (see illustration at right) lists the ingredients as good apples, good spices, figs, raisins and pears. The cofyn of the recipe is a casing of pastry. Saffron is used for colouring the pie filling.

In English speaking countries, apple pie is a dessert of enduring popularity, eaten hot or cold, on its own or with ice cream, double cream, or custard."

Something more to chew on ;)

You see the US is the land of the pickup and apple pie. But sometimes the origins of such concepts started somewhere else.

Even hamburgers started in St Peterburg, Russia.

We have similar parallels in Australia.

The expression. As Australian as a 'meat pie' is incorrect as the meat pie is also a British creation.

So the US isn't alone regarding how ideas and concepts are copied.


https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2014/02/25/ford-celebrates-aussie-ute-s-80th-anniversary.html

@numpty
Even China copies ideas and concepts.

But, when they do it it's not kosher.

Me thinks Big Al from Oz is a little full of himself. I bet where ever he works will and does just fine when he is not around.

I hate to tell you this Big Al from Oz, but nobody is that important as you try to make yourself out to be.

I have a sneaky feeling that in reality your coworkers think of you as an arrogant bore.

@Little Ram Big Horn
If you did a little research and learnt more about the world than what you view on Fox and Friends you might have a smidgen of an idea.

Alas, you are just a simpleton.

Go and find out about the world, it's such an amazing place.

Believe it or not there are people out there who have a little more nuance than you display. I do think you have potential. But it will only remain potential until you and only you try to unlock the barriers that you have put in place.

You have created a place that only exists between your ears and nowhere else. Lonely?

You have created a world to suit your insecurity. Why? Because you lack the knowledge to reason and be objective.

So, you have what is termed an inferiority complex.

Scared you are.

@BAFO - No, pickups are doing just fine. And ahead of the CAFE schedule, at least when talking full-size. Meeting 2025 CAFE requirements may come as soon as 2020, or earlier, the way they're improving. No need to increase their "footprint" or for consumer to switch to HDs.

It's tougher for small trucks b/c there's little room for improvement and even less R&D dollars to go around. But mid-size trucks have crossed over into full-size "footprint". The longest mid-size has a bigger footprint than the base, regular cab full-size. The extended cab mid-sizers aren't far behind.

But European (and therefor Aussie) regulations are based on weight and tailpipe emissions, instead of CAFE footprint/mpg. So they're tougher on smaller vehicles too. Both sides or the pond favour bigger vehicles. But that's just common frickin' sence.

So compared to full-size pickups and pound for pound, midsizers get horrible mpg.

@BAFO - Sorry you're so very confused, but...

"The first factory-assembled pickup was based on the Ford Model T car, with a modified rear body. It debuted in 1925 and sold for US$281. Henry Ford billed it as the "Ford Model T Runabout with Pickup Body." The 34,000 built that first year featured a cargo box, adjustable tailgate, four stake pockets and heavy-duty rear springs." -wikipedia

Yes BAFO, "Pickup Trucks" do predate Model T "Pickups", but they were one-off and modified by end-users. But they were not official "pickup trucks". When consumers and industry needed to haul small to good size cargo, in an efficient manner, and with "car conformity", without stepping up to industrial trucks, they gutted the seat and truck from everyday 'modern' cars, with a cargo box in their place.

That Aussie farmer got the idea from pickups he saw used in America. It wasn't a 'new concept' or anything of the sort. Just a new concept to OZ, at the time.

You're confused because of the terminology in Ford's press release, in OZ/NZ only, promoting the New Ranger. It's a little 'play' on words to entice or even inspire the Aussie/Kiwi consumer:

"Ford is celebrating the 80th anniversary of its Australian invention of the iconic ute, which led to the development of vehicles such as the F-Series and Ranger and propelled the company to years of truck leadership."

Ford (of OZ) may have coined the term "ute", while "inventing" a new vehicle, for the Aussies/Kiwis market, something they'd never seen before, but pickups or utes were old news in America. They just changed the name a pretended "utes" were something "new" to the world. Nope, just OZ.

Don't get fooled (again!), BAFO...

@Denvermike,
They Pickups were old news in Australia in the early 1900's but a Ute was a "civilized" Pickup, although not really a Pickup.

@Robert Ryan
Here is a link to a 1938 Reo RV thing. It actually looks cool and weird at the same time.

http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/s/standard/oo1938_reo_aerocar_01.jpg

@DiM
Actually the first pickup could have been made in Germany by Benz in 1899. It was a light truck rated to carry approximately 3 000lbs.

There were plenty of light trucks in the world prior to the Model T.

The Australian Ford Coupe Utility was the first light commercial to have the comfort of a car with the ability to carry a small 1 200lb load.

As the Ford article states the comfort designed into Ford Utility Coupe was later used by their F trucks.

Have a look at 1/2 ton pickups, they aren't trucks, but SUVs as you have pointed out, similar to the concept of the Ford Utility Coupe.

The Model T wasn't the first pickup. What you are describing is the ability to carry a load behind a cab in a small truck.

Remember vehicles back then had full chassis's. There were also plenty of conversions as well done to make pickups.

The Model T could be the first mass produced light truck. That we can agree on ;)

Even International Harvester had a pickup in 1909.

Have a nice day.

http://streetsofsalem.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/cars-at-codman-015.jpg

http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20110325210718/tractors/images/9/91/1911_International_Wagon.JPG

@DiM
Here are some links;

1899 Benz light truck.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-T5PZGbFWCcc/UUNMfmV2eHI/AAAAAAAAkkw/uXbzgjclTwE/s1600/Historic+commercial+vehicles.jpg

A 1917 Clark Trucktractor

http://www.clarkforklifts.com.au/content/48/5033f5e3/1917TheWorldsFirstTruck.jpg

1915 International

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_OvRILKx6ZaA/SuUQ59p4ujI/AAAAAAAAATU/CGrQTAnJ0fI/s1600-h/Inter+1915.jpg

This would be cooler to own than a pickup!

http://blog.mercedes-benz-passion.com/wp-content/uploads/2048_WP-Unimog-Econic_123.jpg

The ultimate pickup to own.

http://www.carskings.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Mercedes-G-63-AMG-6x6.jpg

You see DiM look outside of your front door, then venture out. Maybe go to Spain and see what they have for light commercial vehicles.

This will help overcome your anxiety about the world outside your home.

Ford has the BOTTOM TWO SPOTS!!! News flash FORD GIRLY GIRLS: FORD LOSES AGAIN!!!

Let it be written....LET IT BE DONE!!!

@BAFO - Correct! It's exactly what I'm saying. Everything in the form of a pickup, before the Model T Pickup, was an 'aftermarket' conversion, or one-off. The 1st official factory "pickup" was the Model T Pickup.


So the 1st official factory "ute" in OZ, was built by Ford of OZ. Also true, but almost a decade after the Model T Pickup, you'll agree.


Obviously stating the "1st ute" was the "1st pickup" and eventually led the way to the F-150 and Ranger, is a bit of a misnomer. Or simply put, some made up BS by a marketing team ヅ

when are they going to put the 5.7 in the Tacoma? that would be a bad *ss little truck.

Heh. I just saw where even D|M states we need more compact trucks. " But mid-size trucks have crossed over into full-size "footprint". The longest mid-size has a bigger footprint than the base, regular cab full-size. The extended cab mid-sizers aren't far behind."

RoadWale, of coarse a longbed crew cab midsize truck is going to be longer then a regular cab full size short bed. If you look at a 2014 regular cab Tacoma though its only a few inches longer then one from 1985.

@RoadWhale - When did I say we need more compact trucks? We need a new hole in the head, more so.

Always said ford did fire sales,,,,

Can't even understand your own words, can you D|M? If, "But mid-size trucks have crossed over into full-size "footprint," means they're too big, then you MUST mean we need a more-compact truck.

@Jack: "of coarse a longbed crew cab midsize truck is going to be longer then a regular cab full size short bed."

Why?
If it's a crew cab, you're simply not going to get a true long-bed style; anything less than an 8' bed is not LONG.
Being mid-sized, the cab and hood should be 25% shorter than the cab and hood of a full size, which would make a crew cab just about the same length as the standard cab full sized. As such, there is no legitimate reason for a "longbed crew cab midsize truck" to be longer than a full-sized, regular cab short bed truck.
And no, you don't see a 4.5' super-short bed on a standard-cab truck. Closest we saw to that was the Subaru Baja and the Ford Explorer "Sport" and both of those were "crew cab" models.

@RoadWhale - I'm talking about the small CAFE "footprint" (or mpg requirement) of mid-size trucks that people cry about being unfair to mid-size trucks. Thing is, it's not so small anymore.

The regular cab F-150, short bed is required to get better CAFE mpg than the biggest mid-size crew cab. If mid-size trucks can't meet the 2025 CAFE requirements, it'll be pretty pathetic. It'll be all crew-cab midsizers with 6' beds anyways.

Lack of technical advancements and thin R&D would be to blame if they can't. And you'd think the smaller a vehicle is, the better the mpg. Not true with mid-size trucks. They're heavier than they look. And with aggressive gears, and undersized engines for all that weight, it makes it kinda tough.

@DiM
I do think you need to read up on how mpg's are rated on vehicles in the US.

Manufacturers can transfer mpg's across vehicle model.

Hence, Corporate AVERAGE Fuel economy.

I do think the word average gives it away.

Understand what you talk about prior to passing opinion. Because that seems to be all you pass other than wind.

@papa jim--True about the Sonotas. GM is still making the older Impala for fleets, for how long I don't know but the fleet buyers still want them. I do still see a nuimber of Camry in rental cars fleets but the Dodge Avengers (now discontinued) and Chrysler 200s are popular among the rental agencies. We will see how the new 2015 Camry sells. There are just too many good competitive midsize cars in the market. Sonota is even coming out with a refresh. My neighbor was one of the first to buy the 2011 Sonota which has been a very good car--very sharp in silver with leather seats and a moon roof. I know a few others that own models from 2011 to 2013 and they have had good service. Toyota and Honda still make good reliable vehicles but the competiton is now just as good or better.

@Jeff S , @PapaJim - in my town there is a mixed bag of rentals depending on the company. One seems to have mostly Chrysler/Dodge stuff and the others have a mix. When I got a rental from Budget they had Ford 1/2 pickups(all with the EB3.5), Suburbans, Tahoes, Escapes, Dodge minivans, and the cars were Toyota, Nissan, and Chrysler.

@Lou BC--It seems when I rent a car they usually give me a Chrysler product. I really enjoyed a Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo with Syrius radio the most, it was an upgrade when my midsize Chrysler 200 rental had a flat and they didn't have time to fix the tire.



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