Ram Turns Up the Heat at Warren Truck Plant

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At a time when Ford is basically gutting two entire truck plants to accommodate the new 2015 half-ton F-Series, Ram is trying to squeeze every ounce, actually every pickup, out of its (Quad cab and Crew Cab) half-ton truck plant in Warren, Mich.

In fact, even though the plant is 76 years old, it is becoming one of the most productive and efficient plants parent company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles owns. After some recent assembly line changes and direct input from the line workers themselves, the Ram 1500 production line is now able to make five more pickups per hour, which translates into almost 30,000 more pickups per year. That number makes Ram dealerships happy because, in case you haven't noticed, Rams have been selling exceptionally well, setting monthly sales records for 52 straight months.

Although each of the plant's 353 workstations was improved in some way, the biggest changes came on the chassis frameline where some of the biggest, heaviest and most awkwardly shaped parts are assembled. Assembling front suspensions, springs and shocks along with mating the chassis to one of three different engines (3.0-liter EcoDiesel, 3.6-liter Pentastar or 5.7-liter Hemi) is a complex and complicated process that is now streamlined to make the process easier and reduce errors.

To read the full Warren Truck Assembly Plant press release, click here.

Cars.com image by Evan Sears

 

Warran Truck Plant 1 II

 

 

Comments

Those little postal service cub vans are aluminum they stop building them in like 1994 or so. They are called grunman or something like that. They seem to last well in salty areas. When I lived in alaska I had a friend and he had an aluminum boston whaler that spent a fair amount of time in the ocean.... Doesn't the ocean have salt in it. Must not cause his boat wasn't corroded.

@Tom
There is several videos at You Tube my son posted include design of 3 stage axial compressor jet.
I am not going to post those links, just to protect my identity.

Don't blame ya, these forums are just for fun anyway. I worked for a company who machined turbine blades for the power generation industry. We also machined various shafts and fasteners out of ridiculous to machine materials. On some of the larger diameter shafts I had to program stops after a couple of 12"long .125 deep turns on the diameter, to change carbide inserts that would have made it completely through several made from tool steels. Because they were around 50% nickel content to withstand extreme temperatures.

All1

Your post is an opinion that cannot be backed up by any facts.


It goes like this Turbo < Turbines.


@Tom
Yep, Inconel is very hard to machine.

Forgot to mention my seat belt. Yes, the seat belt has a really hard time latching. Never had that problem with a vehicle before, but seems like a safety hazard. I have to try it 4-5 times to get the latch to catch, and I'm worried it would just come unlatched in an accident. Again, must be the dust. And I've never had a truck with seats that ripped so easily. I do think somebody that really babied their truck would have few to none of the problems I have had. I imagine the hemi tick has something to do with the dust as well, but I do change oil and air filters regularly and change my oil every 3 to 4,000 miles. Probably not the radio though. That's just plain defective design to have two radios go bad in 4 years of ownership. The thing is, all my trucks go through the same thing, and I have had many more problems with the dodge.

A naturally aspirated internal combustion engine is pretty darn primative in itself

A naturally aspirated internal combustion engine is pretty darn primative in itself

Posted by: Scott | Sep 28, 2014 5:17:14 PM

Yes, it's cheap and reliable. You wouldn't pay for turbine generator combo.

@Beebe
Nothing personal, but did you think, it could be you?


"Ram with more power more options and better MPG than Fords Eco. What's not to like."

It's payload for starters.

Posted by: ALL1 | Sep 28, 2014 4:36:08 PM

Right, are we using Fords magic tow and payload dust or did they remove the drivers seat. lol

Lets not forget the Hemi Ram spanked the Ford Eco burst loaded and unloaded up hill. Ram also handled better with 1,000lb payload. :--)

I will keep my awesome award winning proven Hemi V8 over your wimpy hair dryer V6 turbo.

The thing is, all my trucks go through the same thing, and I have had many more problems with the dodge.


Posted by: Beebe | Sep 28, 2014 5:15:47 PM

Just be lucky your not these Ford owners :--(

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czyaZmYz9FQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KroxsvxdW9Y

BUILT FORD FLAMMABLE!

@Beebe
Nothing personal, but did you think, it could be you?

Posted by: zviera | Sep 28, 2014 5:33:02 PM

Zviera, He's a full of $#!^ ford fan boi.

The lucky Ford owners have a high repair bill.

The unlucky Ford owners watch their truck burn to the ground.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsX3XQjfgMU

THIS WAS MY FORD I OWNED. NEVER AGAIN.

A naturally aspirated internal combustion engine is pretty darn primative in itself


Posted by: Scott | Sep 28, 2014 5:17:14 PM

And still spanking Fords Eco burst in power and MPG and performance. Try again Ford.

Never had that problem with a vehicle before, but seems like a safety hazard. I have to try it 4-5 times to get the latch to catch, and I'm worried it would just come unlatched in an accident. Again, must be the dust.

Posted by: Beebe | Sep 28, 2014 5:15:47 PM

Try rolling the window up while in very dusty conditions. Works for me. lol

And the 6.2 ford spanks the hemi in the halfton segment just like the 6.2 gm spanks them both. 2015 f150 ecoboost get a power bump so if ram wants to compete with the v6 ford they need to bring the 6.4 into halfton market

@Scott, Check out the Eco burst problems on this forum.

http://www.f150ecoboost.net/forum/31-f150-ecoboost-problems

@hemi v8

I don't have an ecoburst. But do have a 6.2 ford 1/2 ton and work provides me with a ram 5500 that has turbo just like ecoburst.

@hemi v8

I don't have an ecoburst. But do have a 6.2 ford 1/2 ton and work provides me with a ram 5500 that has turbo just like ecoburst.


Posted by: Scott | Sep 28, 2014 8:04:48 PM

GOOD FOR YOU! ;--)

@Hemi V8

"Right, are we using Fords magic tow and payload dust or did they remove the drivers seat. lol

Lets not forget the Hemi Ram spanked the Ford Eco burst loaded and unloaded up hill. Ram also handled better with 1,000lb payload."


Yes, a limited slip Ram with both rear wheels spins was able to gain traction better than the open differential Ford with just one wheel spinning in the PUTC test and be first up the hill. Gee who woulda thunken that outcome. Hmm, one wheel peel versus two wheels.

You are also forgetting who won that competition and who won more towing and mpg challenges in that competition. Are you just conveniently forgetting to cherry pick what you want to or do you have alzheimer's?

@zviera


Oh, I forgot to mention the aluminum 18 wheeler parts. What about the aluminum cabs and hoods that some 18 wheelers have had for decades. What about the aluminum wheels that are on most class 8 trucks. What about the aluminum battery boxes, catwalks, steps and many other parts. Even more so, what about the aluminum fuel tank that is in just about every class 8 truck in North America for decades. Those fuel Tanks aren't even painted most of the time and the come in more contact with these road salts you say will corrode aluminum than any regular pickup truck probably would. I have also not even touched on the aluminum trailer and tanker parts. Where is your "road salts will corrode these aluminum Ford trucks" with these 18 wheeler parts.

@All1
Look at them closely. They are very ugly, like my 2 winter season
black painted 3 fold tonneau cover .
The Road salt is not used at runways.

All1

b. Landside Chemicals. The most effective landside chemicals used for deicing/anti-icing in terms of both cost and freezing point depression are from the chloride family, e.g., sodium chloride (rock salt), calcium chloride, and lithium chloride.

However, these chemicals are
known to be corrosive to aircraft and therefore are prohibited for use on aircraft operational
areas.

When any corrosive chemical is used, precautions should be taken to ensure that (1) vehicles do not track these products onto the aircraft operational areas and (2) chemical trucks 31 AC 150/5200-30C 12/9/08 used for transporting corrosive chemicals are cleaned prior to transporting airside chemicals or sand.

Fluid Deicer/Anti-icers.
The approved specification is the latest edition of SAE AMS
 OXLG Generic Deicing/Anti-icing, Runways and Taxiways. Approved products include
glycol-based fluids, potassium acetate base, and potassium formate-based fluids.

Generic Solids.
The approved specification is the latest edition of SAE AMS 1431,
Compound, Solid Runway and Taxiway Deicing/Anti-icing. Approved solid compounds include airside urea,
sodium formate, and sodium acetate.

Directly from FAA.

http://www.faa.gov/documentlibrary/media/advisory_circular/150_5200_30c_consolidated.pdf


You were wrong All1.



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