2015 Ram 1500 Rebel: First Drive

4 Ram Rebel 015 II

Ram's pickup truck formula seems to be working pretty well. With so many standard and optional parts and pieces on the 10 different Ram 1500 trim packages, it is able to add a few more with some clever mixing and matching. Thankfully, the Ram engineers did more than that for the new 2015 Ram 1500 Rebel.

From our earlier look at the Ram Rebel, you probably have a good idea of what makes this vehicle special. Lots of the original chatter centered on the swooping grille and large Ram lettering stamped on the tailgate, but this truck is definitely more than just a pretty face. But before we get into how it performed during our early off-road drive in the volcanic northwestern part of Arizona, let's talk about what makes this Ram 1500 a Rebel.

What It Is

The new pickup is a trim package that takes many of the technology options available on other Ram 1500s and mixes them with some unique features and options. Rather than being something "all-new," this Rebel really is something well-tuned and optimized.

Designed to slot into the middle of Ram's half-ton lineup — between the entry-level Tradesman and top-of-the-line Laramie Limited — all Rebels will have the adjustable four-corner airbag suspension (offered as an option at every level), 33-inch Toyo Open Country all-terrain tires, the eight-speed ZF transmission and a set of heavy-duty skid plates (under the bumper and engine, front axle and transfer case). The high-performance monotube Bilstein shocks have been uniquely tuned to handle relatively harsh inputs (like you might find when running over an uneven volcanic ash field) as well as keeping things controlled when carving mountain canyons. Likewise, the front and rear sway bars have been retuned (in fact, softened) to better complement the stiffer and firmer capabilities of the shocks and airbags.

All Rebels offer an optional clutch-pack limited-slip differential and a completely unique interior that will include red anodized aluminum trim accents in the console, dash and doors. The Rebel, along with the new Laramie Limited (HD and 1500), will have the black headliner and pillars, and it will have a brand-new set of molded front seats that offer a seat bottom and seatback with the actual tread pattern of the Open Country tires that come with the truck.

With as much standard content as the new Rebel offers, there are still plenty of choices to make. In terms of powertrains, the Rebel can be ordered with either the 3.6-liter Pentastar DOHC V-6 (only with 3.92:1 gears and in 4x4) or the 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 (offered with 3.21:1 or 3.92:1 gears, in 4x2 or 4x4 drivetrains). We're told no final decision has been made to eliminate the EcoDiesel engine as a possible future option (that decision depends largely on if Fiat Chrysler Automobiles can allocate more turbo-diesel production to Ram). Finally, the Ram Rebel will be offered in five unique colors.

How It Drives

Our test vehicles for this early media drive were all preproduction units built as some of the first vehicles off the line. But we were assured that, mechanically, these vehicles were as close to production vehicles as it gets. All our Rebels were red with 3.92:1 gears, the 5.7-liter V-8 and eight-speed transmission, so they felt quite snappy off the line, even doing a decent job cruising at less than 2,000 rpm at 70 mph.

10 Ram Rebel 016 II

The Toyo tires are actually the same size as the Goodyear Duratrac tires offered on the Ram Power Wagon, but that's where the similarities end. The Toyo tires are much less noisy on pavement, yet do a good job of grabbing loose gravel, sand and rock. The key feature to the Rebel's abilities rest with the air suspension that offers four different settings, each delivering a different level of ground clearance: Kneel, Aero, Normal and Off-Road.

Like all airbag suspensions, the tradeoff to adjustability comes with the fact that the higher the ride height, the firmer the suspension feels and the less wheel travel it allows. When the terrain is deeply rutted or filled with large rocks or other boulder-like obstacles, the amount of wheel travel or axle flex in the upper Off-Road position can determine whether you make it out or get stuck. Thankfully we never got stuck while driving in the Cinder Hills Off Highway Vehicle Area, but much of the terrain was loose volcanic rock similar to coarse beach sand. To give us a more contact patch on the loose rock, we let out a bit of air from the tires. That certainly helped.

The Ram Rebel's electronic push-button part-time four-wheel-drive system is identical to those offered in other Ram 1500 models, with a high-range lock, low range and two-wheel-drive mode.

The extra low-range gearing and grippy 10.5-inch-wide tires kept our truck right-side up and moving up the loose rock and rutted trails — at one point up the side of a dormant volcano. We especially liked the dedicated GPS coordinate info (four screens deep) in the UConnect multimedia/navigation system that gave us our exact location and at what altitude our truck sat, all with the help of more than 20 satellites circling the Earth (a picture on the screen shows all of them).

At higher speeds, the suspension did a good job soaking up the whoop-de-dos and dirt chop; however we did have to be hyper aware of our speed. In certain situations with certain-sized trail ruts, it was easy to overcome the airbags' and shocks' absorbing abilities and find ourselves uncomfortably off the ground and experiencing bumpy stops when crashing back onto the ground.

When navigating down the steepest part of the trail after we circumnavigated the rim of a dead volcano, we found the 1st-gear/low-range downhill crawling speed quite manageable, but we were surprised that no electronically controlled hill descent feature is available. Still, there didn't seem to be much need for it on the terrain we conquered.

11 Ram Rebel 017 II

Unfortunately, the Cinder Hills off-road park doesn't offer much diversity, so we didn't get to do any technical, full-articulation type of 4x4 trails, where we would have been able to see how well the suspension travel handled hard rocks. In the areas we navigated, we found ourselves not needing more than 8 inches of ground clearance, so we spent much of our time in the more comfortable Normal suspension setting rather than use the 1-inch taller (and firmer) Off-Road setting (which can be engaged in two-wheel drive and high- and low-range, as long as you stay below 25 mph). We like the idea of having that kind of height adjustability just in case, but it seems to us the setup could also come in handy had we buried a tire or two or gotten centered on a log. We've heard some people call the four-corner air suspension an active jack.

Where It Fits

After our drive time with the new Ram Rebel, we have no doubt this is the most trail-capable and off-road-ready Ram 1500 offered, but then again the bar was not set exceptionally high. The previous Ram 1500 off-road leader was probably the Ram Outdoorsman 4x4 with all the options (air suspension, 4x4, Hemi, etc.). The Ram Rebel is clearly a better and more focused four-wheeler, but it's also a better example of a fully integrated package whose sum is greater than its parts list.

The Rebel is not nearly as extreme ready as the Power Wagon is with its sway bar disconnects, live axles and locking differentials. Nor is it set up for desert running or rock crawling like the Ford F-150 Raptor. But from what we've experienced, this new Ram Rebel is not too far underneath, and it offers a certain level of civility that neither of those two examples can match. For the small group of pickups that have off-road credibility, the Rebel seems to offer a good balance of parts and technology. What the engineers have done here is optimize a collection of available technologies to create a well-tuned and well-designed traction package that would make any backcountry explorer or remote campsite lover happy.

Although pricing will not be announced until the end of June, it is likely to hover between $45,000 and $50,000 depending on how you option the truck. Since the Rebel is new, we're guessing the marketing experts might have a bit of pricing flexibility because it is somewhat of an experimental vehicle. This is the first Ram — along with the Ram Heavy Duty Laramie Limited — to have the new face and tailgate design. Without knowing exactly how the public will respond, Ram is guessing the Rebel take in the overall Ram 1500 lineup could be around 5 or 10 percent. Of course, that's the same guess Ram had for the EcoDiesel when it was introduced; based on demand that number was bumped up to 15 and eventually 20 percent.

We'll have more on the Ram Rebel when we get to spend more quality time with it, which we think will have to be with its other off-road competitors. But for now, we are encouraged by how much work Ram engineers have done, and how well the Rebel turned out. This is clearly a new pickup that will push other truckmakers to do better.

Editor's note: This story was updated May 19 to correct information about content and features. 

Manufacturer photos

 

Ram Rebel Chart 3 II

15 Ram Rebel 005 II

2 Ram Rebel 008 II

3 Ram Rebel 011 II

14 Ram Rebel 031 II

7 Ram Rebel 039 II

8 Ram Rebel 042 II

6 Ram Rebel 038 II

9 Ram Rebel 034 II

5 Ram Rebel 035 II

12 Ram Rebel 021 II

 

Comments

I have no idea what are you trying to say.
The true is, my RAM 1500 with coils has better RTI than New 2015 F150.

Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers for 20 degree ramp and where you got them. Show me this numbers for Rebel with regular settings , not Offroad 2 .
Put up or shut up.
Posted by: Cummins | May 21, 2015 12:35:05 AM

"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Cummins
Are you talking to yourself ? Answer your own questions.

Ram 4x4 coil spring approach angle=17.8 degrees
Ford F-150 4x4 approach angle=25.5

Ouch!!!!! Can you even drive over a speed bump with a ram with out scrapping the front???? Maybe that is why I always see Rams not pull fully into a parking spot cause they would smash there front bumper on the curb!!!

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

Hahahahaha.
O see few but hurts in here completely out of topic without any numbers for Rebel RTI.
How come my 5 years old RAM 1500 has better RTI than New 2015 F150?
I gave you those numbers you asked for a while ago.
Cummins is in limp mode and scott is speechless.

Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers for 20 degree ramp and where you got them. Show me this numbers for Rebel with regular settings , not Offroad 2 .
Put up or shut up.
Posted by: Cummins | May 21, 2015 12:35:05 AM

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

@Cummins
Could you finally back up your claims by some numbers?
But real numbers, not made up numbers, like you did before. LOL.


The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

194 is the articulation numbers for the rebels suspension. In normal mode it couldn't pull on a 30 degree due to low clearance so you have to put it in offroad mode to get on a 30 ramp. Rebel suspension is the same as a regular ram air suspension per many sources such as fourwheeler.

Show me a rebel or any air suspension ram for that matter with an rti greater then 194 on a 30 ramp.... Nobody cares about 20 ramps cause that is equivalent to driving up on a curb.

Also on the 20 degree ramp of edmunds the wheel base of the ford is longer. If it was shorter it would score better.....

Why does the ram have horrible approach angle zver???? Bet you won't answer that!!!! Haha

@Scott
Source ?
Please don't tell me your source is Cummins. LOL.

Source for what???

@Scott
For that bs you posted.

What bs specifically?

194 is the articulation numbers for the rebels suspension. In normal mode it couldn't pull on a 30 degree due to low clearance so you have to put it in offroad mode to get on a 30 ramp.

This Bs.

@Scott
Are you there with another bs?

@Scott

Like Lou said earlier, don't waste your time. That F150 in that link he posted was NOT and FX4 and had stiffer springs due to it being the tow package which is evident by the tow mirrors that can only be had with the max tow package.

All he posts is BS crap like he keeps saying which why I just stopped trying to read his crap and only follow up with a copy and past that I know will annoy him. So without further to do......


The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

Hi Cummins.
Nice bs.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

@Cummins
Do you really think that this bs is gonna stick if you repeat it over and over again?
It's like that bs you posted about Outdorsman air ride RTI you don't talk about anymore.


The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.


"That's what rear leaf springs are calibrated for even when empty, they are shorter than last year model to prevent axle wrap. There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty. "


You didn't answer the question. If you are saying that they are stiffer then show they proof you have of the spring rates and deflection rates. I want to see numbers and the links you got this info from. Either put up or shut up.

"There goes your fx4 articulation when offroading empty.
Rebel has air ride and it will get maximum articulation even when empty, because air pressure will calibrate for empty truck, not for maximum payload like fx4 must be done."


Again, show me the wheel travel numbers. Show me the articulation numbers and where you got them. Put up or shut up.

@Cummins
It still didn't stick.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Cummins
Nope. ... Still bs without numbers. Please ,just stop. You look like moron.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@cicka,

You are comparing those huge 2 ft tall RAM letters on the tailgate of the Rebel to the small blue oval Ford emblem on the Raptor and saying the Raptor looks just as bad? Holy cow!!! You better get a white cane and a seeing eye dog because I think you are now going blind.

In no way does the more tasteful small Ford blue oval emblem on the Raptor tailgate compare the hideously huge tacky RAM letters stamped on the Rebel tailgate. And to add insult to injury, they paint the letters in ugly black trim paint to make them stand out even more.

Now, if by some mistake you were referring to the front grill of the Raptor, then the Raptor makes the Rebel look like a ugly red headed parts bin special from Mopar. I'm not a Ford guy, but the Raptor is of several orders of magnitude better in both concept and design than this riduclous parts bin special called the Rebel.

@The different Mike
You are posting at the wrong thread.

@Cummins
You still looks like moron.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Cummins
You really like to be called moron.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Zver,

No, this is the right thread. Scroll back two pages and you will see where he quoted me and then compared it to the Raptor.


I guess moron doesn't know he is a moron.
@Cummins
You still posting bs. Nothing has changed.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Chica

All you have to do is quit your BS and it stops. You keep going and I keep going.

@cicka,

If you are talking about the new upcoming '17 Raptor, well then at least they toned it down by making it part of the tailgate cladding. And, they didn't paint the Ford letters silver to draw even more attention to them.

@Chica and Cicka

Answer them please, because they won't stop posting bs.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@the other mike

And at least they made the 2017 Raptor tailgate lettering optional. It's only part of the graphics package and won't be forced onto everyone like Hegbloom is doing with Ram.

@Cummins
Are you still there ? Did you find any numbers or jusy same old same old.

@Scotie
You better order that 2017 Raptor already. Without any lettering of course.
And with 10 speed. LOL

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Cummins
You are liar.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

@Cummins
We all know, you don't know to comprehend and lie. That's why you don't post a source anymore. Your assumptions won't stick in here.
All your post is bs.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.

allo1ne is winning this battle. Zver should tap out.

@Jason
Yup, Cummins is Moron of the Year. Congratulations.

The FX4 has a greater approach angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater break over angle than the Rebel.

The FX4 has a greater departure angle than the Rebel.

The suspension on the FX4 generally has greater articulation than the air bag suspension found on the Rebel.

The locking differential found on the FX4 are better off road than limited slip differentials.

The FX4 has hill descent will the Rebel does not.

The FX4 has higher payload and towing capabilities than the Rebel.

The 6 speed and 3.5L Ecoboost that can be optioned in the 2015 FX4 has been proven to outperform the 8 speed and 5.7L Hemi found in the Rebel while getting better fuel mileage.

The Rebel has a higher crawl ratio than the FX4.

The Rebel more than likely has a smoother ride on road than the FX4.

So basically with the Rebel you has less off road angles, less articulation, less traction differential, less capabilities, no hill descent, and less performance numbers than an FX4. The plus side to the Rebel is that you get a slightly higher crawl ratio and a smoother ride on road.



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