2016 Silverado 1500: New Face, More Performance

Rolling-shots-Mark-Williams-Silverado-1 II

By Bruce Smith

It has been less than two years since Chevrolet rolled out the current-generation Silverado 1500 pickup truck, yet constant improvements seem to keep coming, as is evident from the refreshed 2016 models we recently tested.

The newest iteration of GM's best-selling pickup now shares DNA with other GM performance cars in what Brian Izard, senior creative designer for the Silverado, calls "cross-pollination between the performance and the truck design studios specifically designed to bring a strong family resemblance between the vehicles."

However, the 2016 Silverado 1500 gets more than a new grille and face-lift; it also benefits from GM's wider use of the company's eight-speed automatic transmission, which is mated to the 5.3-liter V-8. Other new features improve the 2016 truck's performance, safety and utility. Here are the highlights:

Under the Hood

Although engine offerings have not changed for 2016, buyers of LTZ, LTZ/Z71 and High Country Silverados with the 5.3-liter V-8 might think something has changed because the 355-horsepower, midlevel V-8 definitely feels stronger thanks to Hydra-Matic 8L90 transmission previously only offered with the top-level 6.2-liter V-8.

The eight-speed automatic transmission has considerably lower (numerically higher) gear ratios through the first six gears than the 6L80 six-speed that will remain the standard trans in the lower trim levels. The lower close-ratio gear splits of the eight-speed give the uplevel 5.3-liter half-ton Silverados strong acceleration and a throttle response similar to that of the bigger V-8. We found the transmission shifts between 1st and 6th are closely spaced, quick, precise and velvety smooth.

We drove an LTZ crew-cab 4x4 with the close-ratio eight-speed; it gives the 5.3-liter V-8 the launch and towing muscle of the 6.2 without sacrificing fuel economy (EPA numbers have yet to be released). When you hit cruising speed, which comes far quicker than you might anticipate, the final shift into 8th (geared at 0.65:1) drops engine rpm well below that of the 5.3-liter V-8 with the six-speed. If you are performance-minded or a trailer tower, the 5.3-liter with this new transmission choice could be the powertrain combination you've been waiting for.

 

Articulating Side Steps

Silverado Articulating step[4] II

Silverado High Country trims also get retractable and articulating running boards. They are activated by a switch that pivots them out and rearward about a foot, allowing for easy access to the front of the bed, where a toolbox or other gear might sit. Tapping the switch a second time powers the board back to its stored position under the truck.

Likewise, when a door opens the steps swing out in normal fashion, providing easier access for shorter passengers. Tap the switch while the side steps are deployed and they shift toward the tailgate. Shut the door and they retract under the body.

 

Fresh Face, Power Hood

BS Silverado 1500 hood II

There is a difference in appearance between the 2014 and 2016 models, but it's one of attitude. The 2016 looks meaner. The previous model, a bit mild. The dramatically sculpted 20016 hood harkens back to the days of the big cowl-induction hoods on performance cars and trucks. The dual-scoop look is distinctive with high, sharp-edged breaks, and, the designers say, the strong center ridge has function beyond form — it helps add strength to the one-piece aluminum hood.

 

Smart, Bright Lights

BS 2016 Silverado 1500 grille II

If there's something familiar about the new Silverado's headlights, grille and daytime running lights, it's because a lot of the technology and design was pulled from the Cadillac CTS and the new Chevrolet Camaros. The narrow, wide headlights wrap around the front end, giving the illusion the 2016 Silverado is wider than the previous model. Although it's not, the curved running lights, which also serve as turn indicators, provide that effect.

Another lighting change of note: Chevrolet is the first truckmaker to offer LED fog lights, which are available on LT trim levels and above. The optics in the three LED lenses in each fog light set are designed to hit a certain part of the road ahead without the light bouncing off the fog and into the driver's eyes.

Uplevel 2016 Silverado 1500s also incorporate IntelliBeam high-beam assist technology that recognizes not only oncoming vehicles but automatically switches the truck's headlights to low beam; it also recognizes taillights and does the same when approaching a vehicle from the rear.

 

More in Touch

2016-GM-CarPlay-001 II

For those who can't be without their cellphones, all 2016 Silverados (1500, 2500 and 3500) will support integration with Chevrolet's available MyLink multimedia system via Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Both integrate selected phone features onto the MyLink display screen in a smart, simple manner.

This integration of phone and vehicle allows drivers to more easily make calls, send and receive messages, view maps and listen to music using the touch-screen or voice commands, which help drivers keep their eyes on the road.

Manufacturer images; Cars.com photos by Bruce Smith

 

Rolling-shots-Mark-Williams-1 II

2016 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 High Country with trailer[6] II

Rolling-shots-Mark-Williams-Silverado-2 II

 

Comments

Dave,
This is great something different than the Ford marketing hype for me. Or is this PUTC link Ford marketing hype.

Here's some cut and paste's regarding the new aluminium F-150 frame/chassis.

1.
"Also, by using supercomputer software to calculate the exact thicknesses and strengths needed, Ford engineers were able to eliminate about 60 pounds from the frame construction alone."

60lbs, less weight? Thinner already!

2.
"The new frame has essentially the same overall shape, with a slightly deeper center section (it was 9 inches tall and is now 10 inches)."

Thinner again!

3.
"The new backbone ladder frame is completely hydroformed and rolled with compression to newly designated thicknesses to make the structure lighter and stronger."

Lighter? Does that mean less and thinner chassis??

In the end the chassis is stronger, not more durable. The chassis is made from high tensile steel. It is very strong in supporting loads. But, as in any lightened high strength structure it is more prone to fail due to damage.

It will be interesting to see how many of these chassis's are recoverable after an accident.

http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2014/04/2015-ford-f-150-engineers-create-a-new-frame.html

LMAO "my mom's basement. Which was my slogan" So now your saying you invented that saying? Hmmm yeah dude someone better hire you to write made up stories. You are super good at making stuff up tard.

Come on johnny dumb dumb is that the best your little feeble mind can come up with. I'm used to your uneducated post but this is getting even better. Go back to playing your video games in your superman undies little buddy. Let the real men work to pay for all the welfare babies like yourself. So far I'm taking a beating with taxes.

LMAO Only welfare bum I see here is you, if you even made it out of grade school yet. I might just have a GED which I've said before, but I have my own pipe line company. started it from the ground up by myself. Only video game I've ever played was on my smart phone once. Is your daddy home yet? You better go ask daddy for the keys to wash his two trucks, you big old fleet man care taker HA HA HA! Hurry your mom said dinner is almost done.

Yup I have my own pipe line company too. Its when I sit on the toilet. LMAO.
Man I do wish I still lived with my parents still, I would be saving mad cash vs owning my own home. Which is my 4th one since 2003. I like brand new homes so you tend to move. Plus the cash out at the sale is pretty sweet too. Payment free home is in the works.

Your dad just yelled in, you missed a spot while cleaning his trucks. No internet for you tonight Mr. *truck fleet man* HA HA HA!


Your dad just yelled in, you missed a spot while cleaning his trucks. No internet for you tonight Mr. *truck fleet man* HA HA HA!

Posted by: johnny doe | Oct 14, 2015 4:42:26 PM

Nope it is clean now. What else you got Mr Pipe dumb dumb? You don't seem to be very good at this game.

Hey, look at that, I sat down on the toilet and built another pipe line company. I don't remember seeing corn in a pipe line before......................................................

Yeah you are right Mr. EGO I mean LMAO. I don't sit in my mom's basement all day playing games, and beating off like you. Oh boy look out, you got me! You won, oh god! Well at least you gave me and probably lots of others something to laugh at on my slow day. Thanks Mr. EGO I mean LMAO, but I got things to do ta ta for now.


Yeah you are right Mr. EGO I mean LMAO. I don't sit in my mom's basement all day playing games, and beating off like you. Oh boy look out, you got me! You won, oh god! Well at least you gave me and probably lots of others something to laugh at on my slow day. Thanks Mr. EGO I mean LMAO, but I got things to do ta ta for now.

Posted by: johnny doe | Oct 14, 2015 5:39:16 PM

Oh yea, you are fresh out of words. Thanks again for using some of my wording again since your cerebellum is limited on connections. What a burn..................................................

@Big Al - as you know, the thickness of a part or weight has little to do with strength and durability. In the event of a crash or severe impact we have seen vehicles designed to crumple. "Recovering" a frame after damage can be risky even if it is made by more "old school" techniques. Truth be told, I'd rather have my vehicle written off after a severe crash then have it repaired.

Odd, high strength steel has been your mantra and now it is taboo in a frame.

You call those who disagree with you fanboys so what do we call you?

The spawn of Satan is know as the anti-Christ, so does that make you the "Anti-FoMoCo" ?????????????

That does appear to be the underlying message in all of your posts.

You say we are biased but you sir are more biased than the majority. Any Ram's in Oz?

Yeah you invented the English language I forgot. Naw not out of words. just out of time for your EGO Mr. want to be fleet truck man. So yeah ta ta buh bye now.


Yeah you invented the English language I forgot. Naw not out of words. just out of time for your EGO Mr. want to be fleet truck man. So yeah ta ta buh bye now.

Posted by: johnny doe | Oct 14, 2015 6:01:44 PM

You already said you were going. I guess you don't know what those words really mean. Come back when you have something intelligent to say. So far I have seen nothing to indicate that.

Guys!
Can we just keep it to insulting our vehicles. Make the argument of why you believe your vehicle is better engineered, stronger, better at towing etc and leave it at that.

@Big Al - as you know, the thickness of a part or weight has little to do with strength and durability. In the event of a crash or severe impact we have seen vehicles designed to crumple. "Recovering" a frame after damage can be risky even if it is made by more "old school" techniques. Truth be told, I'd rather have my vehicle written off after a severe crash then have it repaired.

Posted by: Lou_BC | Oct 14, 2015 6:00:42 PM

You hit the nail on the head. All frames in the front are designed to crush to absorb energy to reduce what the occupants absorb. The problem with straightening a frame after the crumple zone has been crushed is you just changed the dynamics of how the frame could react in a different accident. Some manufactures do allow for part of the frame to be cut and a new section to be welded back on but now you rely on a human to properly do that. I have seen some frames get straightened out and it will rip in the crumple zone and it was just filled in with weld to cover it. It is easy now to total out a vehicle because when air bags deploy they all need to be replaced and the restraint control module. These alone are very expensive pieces. Now add front end parts, possible dash if it gets damage from air bag deployment and a frame the truck is totaled. And in my mind it should be. But body shops don't want to loose the repair which is understandable and say they can make the repair. With a lot of body shops they are preferred companies with certain insurance companies so an inspector may not be called to inspect the damage. If I had a vehicle damaged to the point of damaging the frame or frame rail in a unibody vehicle I would not want it back. Unless someone will put it in writing that it will pass the exact same crash rating when it was designed.

This LMAO guy has to be a High School kid. Facts are facts, AL cost more and is harder to fix! It takes longer to repair then steel. Heck he thinks body shops use *Bondo* which is just brand of body puddy on every dent, which in fact is wrong. The only time body shops use body puddy any more is when cutting out and replacing a body part. 90% of the time now days dents are fixed with paintless dent repair.


This LMAO guy has to be a High School kid. Facts are facts, AL cost more and is harder to fix! It takes longer to repair then steel. Heck he thinks body shops use *Bondo* which is just brand of body puddy on every dent, which in fact is wrong. The only time body shops use body puddy any more is when cutting out and replacing a body part. 90% of the time now days dents are fixed with paintless dent repair.

Posted by: Jim Caine | Oct 14, 2015 6:22:07 PM

Ok, if the body shop is replacing a body part no bondo is needed. They bolt into place. Door skins, fenders ect. If you replace a back half for something then bondo will be used to smooth out the seam. As I said before if a dent does not break the paint or stretch the metal past what it can be worked with then the dent will need body shop repair. Nice try.

Plus if you could read properly I did not argue that aluminum was more expensive to repair. But steel panels can be fixed cheaper because of old repair process's. Again read. And you and some people that think they know something say aluminum is weak. So if it is weak it should be cheaper to fix-a-dent because it will be able to be rolled back into place easier than steel. So according to you a fix-a-dent repair on an aluminum panel should be cheaper.

So if it is weak it should be cheaper to fix-a-dent because it will be able to be rolled back into place easier than steel.
Posted by: LMAO | Oct 14, 2015 6:34:34 PM

No just because its weak don't mean it should be cheaper!!
Aluminum is a more rarer metal that in which drives up cost. Wow I agree with johnny doe and jim this LMAO guy has to be a clueless ford retard!

Lay off the crack pipe LMAO.

No just because its weak don't mean it should be cheaper!!
Aluminum is a more rarer metal that in which drives up cost. Wow I agree with johnny doe and jim this LMAO guy has to be a clueless ford retard!


Posted by: Hemi V8 | Oct 14, 2015 6:41:20 PM

It might help if you looked up fix a dent before posting.

The only trouble with any vehicle that is totaled by any insurance company is that they are more likely to be auctioned off to a re builder. Many re builders take short cuts in order to make a profit. A re built vehicle can be run through another state and come out with a title that shows that the vehicle has not been rebuilt. Many of these vehicles should not be allowed back on the road. It is not that easy to straighten a frame and to add metal to a frame it will probably be weaker. My only concern with a lighter frame would be if these are badly damaged that they would fall into the hands of a re builder that would take these short cuts--of course that would be a concern with any badly damaged vehicle. I am not going to say that the new F-150s are unsafe but this could be a potential issue.

Is that indent in the hood for collecting the vomit accumulated from looking at that hideous hood?

@Johnny Doe

Why do you keep saying beer can Fords? It keeps showing how much of an idiot you are.

Beer cans are made out of steel. look it up moron.

One would think the 6speed would be a vast improvement from the 4, but it wasn't; as it is programmed for improved fuel economy and takes up to two seconds to kick down when acceleration is needed. Now we are suppose to believe an 8 spd will remedy this. GM engineers: get your head out of your@$$

Lou,
First up high tensile steel hasn't been my mantra.

You see Lou, you don't have much of a clue on materials.

A chassis has a much different role than the body of a body on frame vehicle. Hmmmm.......I really thought you would of understood this.

High tensile steel will provide for a stronger chassis, I even do recall myself stating that, so how can you then turn this around and infer I had not made this comment, as show;

"the thickness of a part or weight has little to do with strength".

The rest of your comment relating too durability is quite incorrect.

A lower tensile steel is more ductile and malleable. This means a deformation can be repaired with less stress created by the repair.

Also, having you vehicle "written off" has a lot to do with the insurer, not you. Believe it or not many accidents are from the side.

I also stated deforming the chassis whilst off roading. This will be easier to do with the thinner high tensile steel chassis. The effect of this will be more severe than with a lower tensile steel.

Read up on how different types of stresses impact the performance of metals.

@Big Al

Me thinks you need a lesson in metallurgy.

There are separate conditions that must be addressed by chemists and engineers in the design & selection of chassis components and the fastening techniques for mass production.

For the sake of your lesson, lets stick to carbon steel for the moment.

1. corrosion
2. shear
3. compression
4. tension

Your reference in an earlier post to tensile strength caused me to wonder about your knowledge of metals in general. Are you available for a lesson later today? After class perhaps. Or would you prefer to to look at Wikipedia (and reply as if you had not)?

1. corrosion--we need a material whose resistance to surface damage is an integral feature of the substance itself
2. shear--we need a component able to resist being literally cut in two by the forces involved
3. compression--the chassis must be strong enough to resist being crushed by impacts and loads anticipated
4. tension--the individual parts making up the chassis must have sufficient tensile strength to prevent being pulled apart from end to end.

Please don't simply memorize my lesson--instead prepare to use what you've learned today to avoid future errors in your thinking. That is all.

Square wheel wells yuck! I see they are following Ford with the step bars, nice to see them finally trying to catch up

The only well almost the only idiot here is you GoDawgs.

"In Canada, the standard size was previously 10 Imperial fluid ounces (284 ml), later redefined and labeled as 280 ml in around 1980. This size was commonly used with steel beverage cans in the 1970s and early 1980s. However, the US standard 355 ml can size was standardized in the 1980s and 1990s, upon the conversion from steel to aluminium.

Most metal beverage cans manufactured in the United States are made of aluminium,[4] whereas in some parts of Europe and Asia approximately 55 percent are made of steel and 45 percent are aluminium alloy. Steel cans often have a top made of aluminium. The aluminium used in United States and Canada are alloys containing 92.5% to 97% aluminium, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverage_can

There I looked it up for you GoDawgs, so you don't have to look like a idiot anymore. Steel beer cans die in the 90s in the US and Rarely still used in a few other countrys, but you know what the steel cans still have aluminium tops. Maybe you should of looked it up, instead of looking like a moron. So yeah beer can F150.

Yup beer can aluminum F150, freightliner truck cabs, tanker trailers for just about any liquid that can be transported over the road, semi trailers for tractor trailer up to 80gcvw over the road, airliners, need I go on. Oh yea, many military applications. LMAO johnny dumb dumb.

@papa jim--Thanks for the information. Good information. I am somewhat familiar with this but it is always good to learn something new. Ford F-150 would have a strong enough frame for most applications but if any frame gets damaged enough it will be unsafe. I doubt most pickup truck buyers are going to be concerned about tensile strength of steel but you brought up some valid points in response to Big Al's comments.

I am starting to see a few more new F-150 trucks but I have seen more new Colorado/Canyons especially the 4 x 4 crew cabs. I have seen a lot of new Sierras and Rams. The dealers around me have been offering some very good deals on those trucks. The new Sierras are a nice truck.

Yeah freightliner truck cabs and tanker trailers made of a different grade of aluminum. Built to last for real work loads and miles, unlike the light weight throw away Ford trucks LMAO dumb dumb.

Yeah freightliner truck cabs and tanker trailers made of a different grade of aluminum. Built to last for real work loads and miles, unlike the light weight throw away Ford trucks LMAO dumb dumb.


Posted by: johnny doe | Oct 15, 2015 8:21:07 AM

So johnny dumb dumb that thinks he is smart smart, what is the difference in the grads of aluminum. Technically.

Well it won't matter what I have to say, since you will just call it wrong anyway, even with the links and all i can use for proof. I mean damn if you are dumb enough to try and compare light duty pickup truck built to last 150,000-200,000 miles, to semi trucks built to last around a million miles hauling 80,000 pounds. Then well its a no hope for you. Anyway I got things that need to be done today, sorry i can spent all day laughing at you today. Better tell mom to bring you a video game and a hot pocket so you have something to do today. Later kid

So will snow water and ice accumulate in the new "hood ditches"? I can just imagine big chunks flying off. Doesn't seem like ponds on the hood would be good for the paint/finish either. They gotta be self draining somehow but I cant see it from these pics. Anyone wanna bet this hood style will be very "limited" production?

@BigAl - you went from saying wimpy 1/2 ton Ram trucks are fine because no one uses them for any work to now saying that Ford's frame won't hold up to off-roading and collisions.

The anti-Ford rhetoric is truly amazing and you say your comments are unbiased or are you implying that Ram 1500 buyers are just large BOF car buyers and Ford truck buyers will actually do real truck stuff with their trucks and therefor need a tougher truck?

Which one is it?

Another question is how does Ford build the Ranger frame?
If it is similar to the F150 then it must be a complete POS too or is the Ranger still vastly superior in your unbiased mind?

Lou aka Denverlike,
Keeping tabs on me? Hmmm.......................

Where do I state these things?

Go back and re-read my scribes.

Go back and have some more Ford cordial.

Go and use google and research how the Ranger frame is made. Hint, it isn't like the new aluminium F-150 frame.

Next in my series on the new Ford will be the 2.7 EcoBoost.

So, where do I state that Ram buyers are "car" buyers and F-150 buyers are "truck" buyers? 75%...........................is the figure I quote.

Lou, keep on trowling.

Still with the aluminum? Good lord... The Army and Marines have been using it for Decades in ground combat vehicles. Its the very backbone of the US Airforce. Have you ever flown on or even seen any airplane? Ridden on a pontoon or non fiberglass boat? A lot of the M16/M4 rifle is made of it. Your truck probably already has aluminum hood regardless of what brand it is. Supercars have had frames and bodies made of it for decades. The relentlessly stressed/taxed wheels on your car or truck are made of it and have been for decades. Semis are made of it... Trailers are made of it. Its been painted, bonded, fastened, welded, stretched, used, abused in countless ways for almost 100 years now... and you think its detrimental to use it on the body of a pickup truck? The body. You know what a car/truck body does? It looks pretty, keeps the weather out, and holds all the glass/accessories. Its not load bearing. It has nothing to do with crash worthiness. The only issues/liabilities with aluminum are cost and manufacturing and lets me be honest you don't know or care what went into casting/making the parts of your car/truck as long as they are affordable and work. CAFE is coming like it or not and weight is a HUGE issue. Like it or not lighter is happening. Its EASY to make something strong and heavy... its hard to make it strong and light. Scary new different things are gonna have to happen to make it happen. Luckily Aluminum has been around and doing just fine for a long time.

Clint,
It seems we are talking high tensile steel.

Aluminium has been used in many applications, as had wood and even clay.

So, because wood is used in many applications doesn't make it ideal for the automotive industry.

Aluminium is a great material, like mashed potatoes with gravy! But, you don't have mashed potatoes with Corn Flakes for breakfast.

The issue with the new 2015 aluminium F-150 is it has far from delivered any real beneficial gains because of the change in material. What has been of real benefit to the consumer with the use of aluminium, that could of been done cheaper with steel?

Even in aviation we use steel. Steel is used in high load areas on the aircraft, similar to how a chassis is still made in steel.

The application of any item must be considered when selecting the best material for construction.

Form, fit and function is paramount in engineering and design. Just because a material can successfully be adapted and used doesn't mean it is the most economical.

Using your narrow definition of the use of aluminium fails to address the form, fit and function aspect of engineering and design.

Whilst aluminium can do the job with the F-150 doesn't mean it is the best material at this time.

There is no real gains by the use of this material that couldn't of been overcome using cheaper existing technology.

A steel pickup will achieve what a aluminium pickup will achieve.........for less money.

I'm not stating not to use aluminium, but how and where the aluminium is used to achieve the best possible outcomes with form, fit and function.

This is where Ford has screwed up.

But, Ford is spinning the aluminium F-150 into something it isn't or has achieved.

Don't get me wrong the aluminium F-150 is a nice vehicle. But the advantages for the use of aluminium will only be of benefit if the vehicle is driven 24/7 by a trucking company.

The cost doesn't outweight the benefits, as there are no real benefits for the average pickup operator with aluminium, only added cost.

papa jim,
Thanks for the great cut and paste. It is educational;)

First look at the effect carbon has on steel when alloyed.

More carbon equates to less resistance to corrosion.

More carbon equate to less ductility and malleability of the metal.

Just looking at the data for metal and it strength doesn't address how metals are used in different applications and the drawbacks with the use of certain metals.

You do have some information missing. Answer this. What occurs when a material ie, high tensile steel is used in areas of higher load?

What effect does deformation have on a material? What is the difference in stress generated by deformations.

The cut and paste you provided does prove my point. I stated that the new F-150 chassis stronger.

What it isn't is more durable. Damage to most any high tensile material is create stress easier than a lower tensile metal.

Using lead or gold as an example compared to glass.

Glass is stronger, but they react differently under load. This example is extreme, but the same physics can be applied to similar metals.

As an example Ford did have issues in creating the correct formulae for the aluminium body panels when stamping them.

It doesn't take much to make changes to the characteristics in metals.

A higher tensile steel chassis will be more prone to failure with less warning than a lower tensile chassis.

@Big Al


golf clap

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CP6v4T3VT7I

https://www.efatigue.com/training/probabilistic_fatigue.pdffailure

@Big Al -

great link:

"File Not Found

The page you are looking for does not exist on our system"

Jeff S, Lou and papa jim,
Have a read of this link.

What you guys must realise is I do work everyday with cracking and even the failure of components due to stress (loads).

If a thinner, higher tensile structure is deformed stress will have a greater impact on the structure. For example look at an aircraft. They are immensely strong structures, but they are more prone to failure due to stress. Higher tensile steel also fails more catastrophically than lower carbon steel. The lower carbon steel will deform easier, but will not fail as easily. I'm not talking the strength of the structure.

Remember the term "intended use". The intended use of the pickup by the majority will probably never see any issues with the chassis on the F-150. But, in off road situations you can easily bottom out on the chassis and deform the chassis structure. Remember the bottom chord of the chassis is the chord that bears the load.

Read this link. The link is about loads on frames.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download;jsessionid=174BE7636486C0BB76BC3A4035B6A8D3?doi=10.1.1.300.7152&rep=rep1&type=pdf

But even you said depending on the formula the strength can change. What proof do you have the formula is not correct for this frame. It just looks like you are speculating about the frame with no actual data, testing, or formula. In fact do you even know what type of metal the frame is. I sure don't and never seen the formula advertised I'm sure that's a pretty good secret along with everyone else's. Talking about high strength frames is nothing new. GM and Fiat have been doing this for years in their advertising.

LAMO,
Formula????????

What has occurred with this frame is Ford has moved metal around by varying the thickness. In other words it has shed weight, not gained.

Since the walls of the chassis are taller they are thinner. If an impact is delivered to the bottom chord the side walls will deform easier, hence a larger deformation will occur.

Don't look at the strength. It is a strong chassis. To make it easier for you LAMO, picture a truss. A truss has three major components, top chord, bottom chord and webbing.

You can manufacture a lighter truss that is stronger just by using lighter material and increasing the distance between the chords.

Now we have a stronger truss, but it will be prone to failure easier due to an impact. Why? The lighter material will deform easier than heavier material.

Just because something can take a larger load doesn't mean it will be more durable. Again, glass is very strong under certain conditions, but yet it is fragile.

I was thinking of a truss originally but as I'm sure you know a truss is generally strong in an up and down load. Side to side very weak. Now the part where you say bottom out on a rock on the frame. Yes I do not argue that a thinner metal could push in easier thus compromising the structure. But I have to believe a soft metal frame would be in the same boat. Either way both frames are in need of replacement unless there is an authorized repair process. But I would have to believe a stronger frame strength would be more resilient to movement in applications where the raptor is at home in. High speed off road, not so much rock crawling.

One thing we do not know is how the weight compares to other frames. GM has always been the lightest trucks with their paper thin sheet metal.

What do you think the primary load on a chassis is, lateral?

No but there would be some lateral load from the suspension. And possible twist loads. It's primary is still supporting load and if towing resisting stretching loads from a trailer at the rated limits. Then you have the tongue loads at the very back section where the hitch connects to the frame. I see a frame having a very dynamic job.

Al,

Whats wrong with mashed potatoes for breakfast? Have you never had pancakes for dinner? When a block is only in your mind its just that. Only in your mind.

The weight savings simply are not there with steel in the body. Weight MUST come down. That means LESS steel. That means more "exotic" and less traditional metals and less of the older ones. Obviously aluminum is NOT currently the preferred material for high stress components like the frame but for non load bearing/stressed components it promises significant weight savings and weight is a huge part of meeting CAFE.

Its easy to make something strong. Its easy to make something light. Its easy to make something heavy. Its easy to make something strong and heavy... any moron can do those. It take genius to make some thing strong and light.

As volume rises prices will continue to fall. The novelty, research, start up, adaptation costs associated with the use of aluminum in vehicle bodies will gradually be amortized, absorbed, and diffused just as it was when we went from clay and wood to steel... Prices will never fall back to steel but then again the prices associated with steel never reverted to wood either. Its the natural order. Better = More. Ford was just the first. They wont be the last. In some ways the use of aluminum hoods by them already shows the principal/theory is sound its just an issue of taking the plunge and reaping the full benefit. Truth be told Chrysler and GM were probably partially prevented from being so cutting edge because of their bankruptcies.

When was the first, last, only, or any time a truck manufacturer took an existing line/model and in a single year rebuild made it more capable in every way while taking 300 to 700lbs of weight out of it? Only 2 instances come to mind. Both were very recent and both were from Ford and both were largely through the extensive use of aluminum and HSS.

I agree every material has a time and a place and a job and price is a huge factor in that. The time for aluminum in full size truck bodies has come.

Clint,
Do some research.

Believe in what you wish.

The F-150 isn't more capable and the capability that is being offered isn't wanted so much by the public.

It comes down to cost vs outcomes. Add to this the advantages that Ford are trying to market and the consumer doesn't seem to be wanting this as well.

They view the pickup as a pickup.

A HD is more capable than a 1/2 ton, do HDs outsell 1/2 tons?

A midsize 4x4 is more capable off road and in most instances can supplement what a 1/2 ton can do, do these sell better?

You can manufacture the most capable pickup, ie, AMG 6x6 G Wagen, this doesn't mean it will be the best seller.

Is the shorter spring length aluminium F-150 more capable and where?

So, it can carry more weight, and it weighs around the same as it's competitors. This doesn't make it more attractive to sell than the old F-150.



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