2017 Toyota Tundra: What's Changed

Toyota Tundra front 1 II

By Rick Popely

Most significant changes: Models with the 4.6-liter V-8 gain a tow hitch receiver as standard; power front bucket seats are a new standard feature for Limited models.

Price change: The average price increase across the 2017 Tundra lineup is $535. The base SR two-wheel-drive double cab is $880 more at $31,215, while the most expensive Platinum and 1794 Edition CrewMax models are $450 more at $51,225 (all prices include a $1,194 destination fee).

On sale: Now

Which should you buy, 2016 or 2017? 2016 (slightly less expensive)

The major players in the half-ton, full-size pickup market have been upping the ante every year with new powertrains, convenience features and option packages. Nissan, in particular, has made a huge investment, making a renewed push into this competitive segment with a fully redesigned half-ton Titan and a more tow-worthy Cummins-equipped Titan XD. Toyota, though, has remained relatively quiet, with the last significant change to the Tundra coming three years ago.

The 2017 model year is another quiet one for the Tundra. The only changes are that models with the 4.6-liter V-8 gain a standard trailer tow hitch receiver and the Limited models add standard power front bucket seats.

Otherwise, Toyota's half-ton pickup returns relatively untouched in three cab styles: the two-door regular cab, the four-door double cab with conventional rear doors, and the massive CrewMax with larger rear doors and a bigger rear seat. Available bed lengths are 5.6, 6.6 and 8 feet long. Two gas V-8 engines are available: a 310-horsepower 4.6-liter and a 381-hp 5.7-liter.

All models have a six-speed automatic transmission and the option of rear-wheel or four-wheel drive except for the more rugged TRD versions, which are four-wheel drive only. No diesel or heavy-duty models are on the roster, and maximum towing capacity is 10,500 pounds.

Like other Toyota models, Tundra has a loyal following because of its perceived quality, reliability and general competence. But it lacks the low-end grunt, towing and payload strength of the other more popular pickups from Ford, Chevrolet, Ram and GMC. That is a key reason Toyota half-ton runs fifth in sales; the league-leading Ford F-150 outsells the Tundra by more than 4-to-1.

The 2016 Tundra competed in our Texas Truck Showdown 2016: Maximum MPG and our Texas Truck Showdown 2016: Max Towing.

Cars.com photo by Evan Sears

 

Comments

@borla: How about the cam tower leak and bed rust--the latter some owners have and probably don't know about because it can't be seen till the plastic bed liner is removed.

Cam Tower: http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/tundra-problems-maintenance-repair-dealer-warranty-issues/140601-cam-tower-oil-leak.html

Here are two other things that have changed with the Tundra, marketing and its status with Toyota.

First, back in '07, the Tundra was advertised as the truck that's changing it all with its tough feats of strength and durability that were meant motivate big three truck owners to it. Now the commercials are very car like--guess if it's driven like a car then that should help to bolster the QDR...

Second, the chief engineer for Toyota trucks states the truck is a niche vehicle.

Why in the heck does a Toyota luxury vehicle have lockers in the front and rear when the Tundra TRD Pro, an OFF-ROAD vehicle, doesn't have a single locker? Toyota's truck program is haphazard at best...

@NoQDRT

Answer is simple: the sticker price.

The various V8 powered Lexus SUVs are stickered above $60k for the most part. It would be hard to find one below $55 that's for sure. Alternatively it would be hard to find more than a few Tundras that actually sell for $55k these days.

Lexus competes in the clouds with Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Cadillac. The Tundra competes down in the mud with the Fords and GMs of the world.

Not that complicated.

@papajim: So sticker price has more to do with it than the intent of the vehicle? I don't buy that. A Tundra TRD Pro starts at about $44K; adding a good locker would add about $2000, bringing the price to about $46K, which is not too far from the average price of a half ton these days.

@NoQDRT

referring to this discussion in terms of marketing. If I'm Toyota and want to optimize the "menu" for customers, I'd rather devote time/attention to customers who happen to spend the most (big tickets) and most often.

It's only about what makes sense to marketers.

I drove Toyotas for years but could not get past the frame on the full size Tundra. Crawled under a new Tundra recently to see if it was better than before but still looks very lacking. I stress a truck way too much to go with that. Hey if you just drive it like a car everything else is great!

I've been waiting since 2014 for a Tundra overhaul.... Held out the past 3 years hoping, I admit that I was a fool for giving Toyota that much of my life waiting and I'm a bit bitter with the way I perceived Tundta owners being treated overall. In any case, last week I finally pulled the trigger on a Superduty. This Die-hard Toyota guy is moving on.

I was one of the earliest owners of a 1st gen Tundra- I drove it for nine years. I loved that truck, and I've always been a fan of Toyota.

I have waited since 2009 for something cool to happen with the new Tundra...reliability is great, but it is really outclassed by the competition in handling, NVH, engines, technology...pretty much everything.

I would be the first person in line if Toyota released an updated Tundra, perhaps with a Cummins diesel or the 4.5L Diesel Toyota has overseas. I just couldn't wait any longer...for now, I'll drive a more modern truck. I have 20K miles on my 2015 F150 and love it.

Toyota fuel economy is terrible. I've worked for Toyota as a manager for 15 years now. This is no where near what the company is capable of. As an employee, we have a lot of quality vehicles. The Tundra is well behind the technology curve.

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OK, here is the breakdown based on vehicles I have owned from 1973 to 2017:

4 Chevy's
4 Jeeps
2 BMW's
1 Ford (2014 Ford F250. currently own)
4 Toyota's (2015 Tundra, currently own)
1 Cadillac (2009 SRX currently own)

Now, with out a doubt, the Tundra is by far the best in it's class, and second is the Cadillac.

The Fords, BMWs and Jeeps do not compare!!!!!!!!!!!!! Do you want me to say that again?

OK, here is the breakdown based on vehicles I have owned from 1973 to 2017:

4 Chevy's
4 Jeeps
2 BMW's
1 Ford (2014 Ford F250. currently own)
4 Toyota's (2015 Tundra, currently own)
1 Cadillac (2009 SRX currently own)

Now, with out a doubt, the Tundra is by far the best in it's class, and second is the Cadillac.

The Fords, BMWs and Jeeps do not compare!!!!!!!!!!!!! Do you want me to say that again?

I'm not going into conspiracy theories or anything like that. Let's just start with the truth. Toyota has developed an amazing powerful efficient diesal enigine. How do I know this ... well let's just say I live next to a vehicle test site. No this new engine was to give Toyota trucks about 60mpg... yes I know hard to believe. So when I ask how soon will this be available since of course I want one. I was told this was not made for the US. Yes I know sad but true.



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