What's the Best One-Ton Heavy-Duty Truck for 2018?

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By Aaron Bragman

It seems like all the news these days is about full-size, one-ton, heavy-duty pickup trucks with a dual rear axle and prices approaching $100,000, but not everybody needs such a monster machine. Some folks just need a good, solid work truck — a big one, something that can haul, tow and get folks to a jobsite that may not be on a paved road.

2018 One-Ton Heavy-Duty Truck Challenge

Results | Towing | How We Tested

We invited three players to our 2018 One-Ton Heavy-Duty Truck Challenge — the 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 3500, 2018 Ford Super Duty F-350 and 2018 Ram 3500 — stipulating that we wanted to test a one-ton single-rear-axle truck with the top gooseneck towing package. The powertrain had to be diesel, but two-wheel drive or four-wheel drive was up to the automaker, as was the bed length. We set the price cap for this adventure at $75,000 — still a considerable amount of money, but average for a class that can see prices soar much higher.

The Judges

Our judges were a trio of experienced truck experts, each with a different area of expertise:

  • Mark Williams, PickupTrucks.com editor. Williams has been driving pickups and 4x4s for more than 30 years, reporting on all aspects of pickup trucks for PickupTrucks.com for the last eight years.
  • Aaron Bragman, Cars.com Detroit bureau chief. Bragman has reviewed trucks for years, logging thousands of miles towing and hauling, and reporting on pickup trucks and the auto industry.
  • Matthew Barnes, product engineer and industry blogger. Barnes' day job is testing hitch equipment for Progress Manufacturing Inc.

Testing and Scoring

Testing each truck's abilities is important to us. Anyone can deliver a subjective opinion, but the numbers often tell the tale and make or break a truck in a competition like this.

We put the trucks through 16 empirical tests around Kingman, Ariz., a hot, dry, lightly trafficked locale with easy access to off-road areas, steep mountain grades and long stretches of highway. Those tests included accelerating and braking with and without gooseneck dump trailers loaded with gravel on a runway at the Kingman Municipal Airport, towing up the Davis Dam grade, payload and towing capacity comparisons, fuel economy and noise intrusion testing.

Judges also scored the trucks in 10 subjective categories from interior comfort and quality to visibility and value. Combined, our empirical and subjective tests totaled a maximum of 2,200 points (1,600 max for empirical tests and 600 for subjective tests). Of course, none of the trucks hit that perfect score, but the totals were impressive, as you'll see below. For a deep dive into our testing, see our How We Tested article. And for the details of how these three competitors were equipped, see our What You Get chart below.

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And now, without further ado, here's how the trucks stacked up after all the dust settled:

No. 3: 2018 Ram 3500 Laramie, 1,938 points

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Our Test Vehicle

As-tested price: $74,435

Equipment: 385-horsepower, turbo-diesel 6.7-liter Cummins inline six-cylinder; Aisin six-speed automatic transmission; part-time four-wheel drive; auto-leveling supplemental rear air suspension

Rear axle ratio: 3.42:1

Torque: 930 pounds-feet

Gooseneck towing capacity: 16,730 pounds

Calculated fuel economy, empty: 16.9 mpg combined

The verdict: The favorite of two of the three judges, the Ram 3500 was the most comfortable truck overall and was the least fazed by a heavy trailer. Last-place acceleration and fuel economy finishes, plus a loud interior, kept it out of the top spot.

Analysis: The judges universally praised the Ram for its comfort, drivability, civility, stability and other qualities. Of all the trucks, the Ram felt most comfortable with a load behind it, especially when the trailer brakes were switched off on our 40-to-zero-mph panic stop test. But the Aisin transmission seemed to be the weak point here: The Ram 3500 had a 3.42 rear axle ratio that should have been good for highway cruising, yet it still scored the worst for fuel economy, and it did it no favors for acceleration results or 60-mph engine noise levels.

The Good

Comfortable interior: "Everything was easy to reach, the driver's seat was most comfortable for me, and the rear seats were heated and had vents," Barnes said. "It has a bumpin' sound system, too," Bragman added. "That Alpine unit sounds sick!" That's a good thing.

Thoughtful storage solutions: The Ram 3500 had plenty of nooks to store and hide gear. "Hidden storage and under-rear-seat configurations are a nice touch. I especially like the thoughtful lighting under the rear seats," Williams said. Bragman appreciated the functional cellphone or tablet holders in the center console.

Smooth ride: Everyone had big praise for how the Ram 3500 rides, thanks to its rear air suspension in conjunction with the common leaf springs. "Road feel when towing was about as smooth and confident as I've felt in this segment," said Williams. "It has been a while since I've driven a one-ton single-rear-wheel axle with the airbags, but between the leaf springs and bag pressure, this is incredibly well-dialed in."

Towing stability: Of the three trucks, the Ram 3500 felt the most at home towing a heavy trailer. Barnes said the Ram was the "most stable truck while towing; there were no vibrations or other issues, making the Ram the most confident tow vehicle of the three tested." It also handled itself best under panic braking when the trailer brakes were switched off, stopping a stunning 20 feet shorter than the third-place Ford, with perfect poise and control.

The Bad

Worst acceleration: We wouldn't call it slow exactly, but the Ram finished last in all of the acceleration tests. We think the Aisin transmission might have been the culprit, as it had a decidedly rough demeanor versus its competitors. "The transmission definitely has a commercial feel to it that takes some getting used to," Williams said. "That 1st-to-2nd gear shift is a hard one, and I am guessing plenty of power is pulled out to accommodate the torque." It's also sported a 3.42:1 final drive ratio versus 3.55:1 for the Ford and 3.73:1 for the Chevy, which didn't help.

Mediocre fuel economy: A taller gear ratio like a 3.42:1 should have helped with fuel economy, but it didn't — the Ram scored poorly here too, averaging 16.9 mpg without a trailer and 9.9 mpg with the trailer.

Cruise control: Unlike the other trucks, the Ram 3500's cruise control would let you get well beyond your set speed going downhill before applying the exhaust brake. "The cruise control was rather ambiguous," Barnes said. "Sometimes it would be at the right speed, but it wouldn't start the exhaust brake until about 5 mph over the set speed." Williams saw it go as high as 8 mph over the set speed before actively working to slow itself.

It's loud: There's a certain degree of diesel truckiness that's cool in a one-ton rig — but the Ram 3500 goes a bit too far, scoring the worst in interior noise levels. At idle or at highway speeds, the Cummins engine makes itself very well known, which we understand some truck buyers appreciate.

Research the 2018 Ram 3500 | Search Inventory | Photo Gallery

 

No. 2: 2018 Ford Super Duty F-350 Lariat, 2,012 points

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Our Test Vehicle

As-tested price: $74,470

Equipment: 450-hp, turbo-diesel 6.7-liter Power Stroke V-8; TorqShift six-speed automatic transmission; part-time four-wheel drive; LED headlights; adaptive steering

Rear axle ratio: 3.55:1

Torque: 935 pounds-feet

Gooseneck towing capacity: 20,600 pounds

Tested fuel economy, empty: 17.8 mpg combined

The verdict: Spacious with a commanding seating position and bountiful visibility, the tech-laden Ford helped make towing easy by providing the driver with tons of useful information — but it didn't handle the actual job of towing well enough to snag the top spot.

Analysis: The big Ford F-350 (and we do mean big; this thing dwarfed the other two trucks) came close to taking the top spot, falling just 11 points short of the victor. It scored well in the 40-to-60-mph rolling test, and it had the highest gooseneck tow rating by a significant amount. But the towing performance of this single-rear-wheel Ford Super Duty F-350 left us underwhelmed, as it felt like it was most affected by the load behind it. We loved the information it gives to the driver, but interior comfort was an issue for some, as well.

The Good

A great view: Our judges liked the spacious interior and the visibility that such a tall roof and high seating position afforded. Bragman enjoyed the view out once the cabin had been successfully mounted. "It's one heck of a climb to get up in, but once you're there, the view out is unparalleled," he said. "With such big windows, visibility is excellent."

Tons of information: The judges universally liked the amount of data that the Ford F-350 provided the driver through its instrument cluster, gauges and multimedia center. "Absolutely love how configurable and accessible the information is on the screen between the speedometer and tachometer," Williams said. "Tons of info and the driver can prioritize it for easier access of the readouts they want." Barnes agreed: "Best technology of the group by far, with the adaptive cruise control, 360-degree camera system, power drop tailgate button and electronically extending mirrors."

Auxiliary switches: The Ford F-350 was the only truck equipped with overhead auxiliary switches, which are great for those planning to up-fit a vehicle.

Lots of bed tech: There were lots of innovative features in the bed. Our Ford F-350 had a tailgate step, push-button LED lighting, lockable tie-down cleats and a push-button drop tailgate (on the tailgate, from inside the cab and even on the key fob).

The Bad

Not happy with our trailer: Several judges said that it felt like the trailer was pushing the truck around a lot more than the other competitors, creating a less stable, less confident experience. "When towing over the road, the rear suspension got into a weird resonance wave where the trailer was pushing and pulling the Super Duty," Williams said. "It got bad enough to where I had to let off the throttle and coast a bit to let all the weight recalibrate." Barnes experienced a similar issue while towing up a moderate grade. "The Ford towed well overall but had a serious fore-and-aft frequency issue that was started by certain bumps and would keep getting worse unless the throttle was released."

Poor braking stability: When we switched off the trailer brakes, the Ford F-350 did not inspire confidence in our closed-course 40-to-zero-mph emergency panic stop testing. Drivers experienced a lot of lateral movement and loss of composure.

Uncomfortable seats: Ford's pickup seats continue to disappoint. "The seat-bottom cushions feel short, or maybe it's the seatback that pushes me too far forward," Bragman said. "Either way, I feel like I'm sitting on the edge of the seats in the Ford."

Tight engine compartment: The big diesel V-8 is stuffed under that tall hood with no room to spare. "Engine layout looks fine for changing the air filter, but the rest of it looks like a hoarder's closet, packed with tubes, pipes, hoses and cooling sinks," Williams said.

Research the 2018 Ford F-350 | Search Inventory | Photo Gallery

 

No. 1: 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 High Country, 2,023 points

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Our Test Vehicle

As-tested price: $70,965

Equipment: 445-hp, turbo-diesel 6.6-liter Duramax V-8; Allison 1000 six-speed automatic transmission; part-time four-wheel drive; Rear axle ratio: 3.73:1

Torque: 910 pounds-feet

Gooseneck towing capacity: 17,200 pounds

Tested fuel economy, empty: 18.7 mpg combined

The verdict: The Chevrolet Silverado 3500 proves an aging platform doesn't matter when your performance is this strong. It finished first due to top marks for performance, an impressive level of equipment and a value price to boot.

Analysis: The Chevy Silverado wasn't any of our judges' favorite truck; none of them picked it as the overall winner in the 10 subjective testing categories. But first-place performances in 10 empirical tests more than made up for it, with the aging Chevy edging out the completely redone Ford and plush Ram for the top spot in our Challenge thanks to strong acceleration, good towing manners, top fuel economy and overall livability.

The Good

Smokin' value: At this price, you apparently have a choice — the mid-level trims for a Ford or Ram pickup, or a top luxury trim level for a Chevrolet. We got a loaded luxury Chevrolet Silverado 3500 High Country for the price of other manufacturers' mid-level trims and still came in thousands of dollars less than the Ford or Ram competitors. Even if Chevy had sent us a long-bed version of the 3500, as the others did, the sticker price still would have come in a lot less than the Ford or Ram.

Feels like a smaller truck: "The Chevy has strong pulling power and comfortable seating feel," Williams said. "It drives more like a half-ton truck with a monster motor. I think there's something to the fact that GM hasn't tried to make its HD trucks into monsters that is connecting with consumers. That's probably because GM has a new medium-duty Silverado 4500/5500 for even heavier-duty use."

Quiet inside: Barnes believed the Chevrolet Silverado had the calmest interior, and the test numbers backed him up. "The Chevy was noticeably quieter than the other trucks in this test, both inside and out," he said, and it's true — the Silverado scored best at idle and at 60 mph according to our sound-testing decibel meter.

Strong acceleration: The Chevrolet Silverado 3500 was quickest in our quarter-mile test — both with and without a trailer — quickest in the zero-to-60-mph test (almost two seconds faster than the Ram) and quickest in our hill-climb test. At least some of that success can be attributed to its 3.73:1 final drive ratio, but this has no penalty on fuel economy, as ...

Top-notch fuel economy: ... It also was hands-down the best for fuel economy, achieving 18.7 mpg combined without a trailer and 10.4 mpg combined towing a 4,900-pound Big Tex gooseneck dump trailer filled with 8,100 pounds of gravel.

The Bad

Insufficient information: While the Chevrolet Silverado 3500 provides some information to the driver about what the truck is doing, it falls well short of the Ford and Ram in giving complete info. For instance, the diesel exhaust fluid gauge has only two readings: "enough" and "refill now." You can't see what gear you're in when in Drive; you must shift the transmission into Manual to see the gear in use displayed on the information screen.

Awkward cabin layout: We've complained before about the offset position of the steering wheel and it's still a problem, one that we hope will be addressed when the next generation of heavy-duty Chevrolet trucks arrive in the next year or two.

Mediocre cameras: The Chevrolet Silverado 3500 lacks a bed camera, and there's no way to activate the rearview camera while you're going forward as you can in the others. Our top-of-the-line vehicle was not equipped with the aftermarket extra side cameras (which activate when using your blinkers), but we're not sure that would have compared well anyway with either of the other systems.

Diesel exhaust fluid mess: We dislike just about everything regarding the DEF system on the Chevrolet Silverado 3500. Barnes was unequivocal: "The DEF system needs work on every part — the fill location under the hood is the worst in the industry, the DEF tank's low position is the worst in the industry and the in-dash DEF gauge itself is the worst in the industry." As noted earlier, it has two positions: "enough" and "refill immediately." Not good enough.

Lackluster storage: "There's nowhere to really slip a cellphone that has it accessible and still powered up," Bragman noticed. "Kudos for having lots of USB ports, but then it's odd that there's nowhere to securely put the thing you've just plugged in."

So, while none of the judges picked the Chevrolet Silverado 3500 as the best experience, its strong empirical test performances put it over the top. We value a truck's empirical ability as much as, if not more than, subjective evaluations. Our scoring is designed to allow readers to weight the test categories important to them any way they wish. So, have at it: Feel free to weight the scores you'll find in our full-length chart in our How We Tested story to determine your own personal winner. If you're looking for the latest and greatest features, a lot of technology and creature comforts, the Chevy might not be for you. But if you're looking for the quickest, most comfortable, most efficient one-ton pickup truck around that's quiet and easy to tow, and a smokin' value to boot, the 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 is the one to get and the overall winner of our 2018 One-Ton Heavy-Duty Truck Challenge.

Research the 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 3500 | Search Inventory | Photo Gallery

Cars.com photos by Chris Collard

 

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Comments

@papajim -- Regarding the odo readings on the different one-ton challengers, the Chevy had less than 1,000 miles, the Ford just under 5,000, and he Ram about 1,500.

Posted by: Mark Williams | Jul 30, 2018 11:28:50 AM

Well there is the reason the Ford lost, it's nearly worn out.

I love how the excuses roll out over and over for the Ford guys. The fact is the power joke has not out performed the Duramax in 18 years.

The fact that u roll out sales, is idiocrocy, bc ford has more loyal followers or believers in Ford lies propaganda than anyone else. its like a mini cult...

I am in the market for a he truck and this article is very informative. Great job guys. I'll probably still go with food but it may not be a dually.

@Darrell M.-- You'd do pretty well with any one of these big pickups but glad we could be helpful. Let us know what you end buying.

@Darrell M.-- You'd do pretty well with any one of these big pickups but glad we could be helpful. Let us know what you end buying.

"Several judges said that it felt like the trailer was pushing the truck around a lot more than the other competitors, creating a less stable, less confident experience. "

LOL wait, wasn't fullsize_only the one ripping on the GM HD trucks for being fast but not built to handling heavy towing with confidence. Between the too-soft suspension and the death-wobble-like shuddering when the truck hit the expansion joints, it sounds like the F-350 is the one that you wouldn't want if you want confident handling and braking stability while towing. Plus is was slower and burned more fuel.


-----------

The Chevy narrowly outperformed the Ford on some of the tests but the difference was hardly consequential.

Posted by: papajim

The Chevy didn't have the nervous behavior exhibited by the Ford. Which must come as a major surprise to many, since most Super Duty fans will blindly claim that the GM HD's are the ones that can't handle heavy trailers and exhibit poor suspension/handling/braking characteristics.

"Several judges said that it felt like the trailer was pushing the truck around a lot more than the other competitors, creating a less stable, less confident experience. "When towing over the road, the rear suspension got into a weird resonance wave where the trailer was pushing and pulling the Super Duty," Williams said. "It got bad enough to where I had to let off the throttle and coast a bit to let all the weight recalibrate." Barnes experienced a similar issue while towing up a moderate grade. "The Ford towed well overall but had a serious fore-and-aft frequency issue that was started by certain bumps and would keep getting worse unless the throttle was released."

The emergency braking results were just as bad it seems:
"When we switched off the trailer brakes, the Ford F-350 did not inspire confidence in our closed-course 40-to-zero-mph emergency panic stop testing. Drivers experienced a lot of lateral movement and loss of composure."

That's a big deal and the team at GM that worked on the current GM HD trucks deserve credit for really turning their HD truck program around. Compared to the old GMT800 era HD's, the truck is a serious competitor despite "only" being an IFS truck.

Anyone that can afford a $75K pickup can only be so concerned with fuel costs. In any case the ram excelled in the area of utility that matter most in this category, towing confidence. If I’m entering the 3/4 ton and greater section, it’s because I do serious towing and need the capability. If I was most concerned with comfort, technology and sports car handling, I’d get a half ton or a Camry.

GUTS
GLORY
MOUNTAIN MOVING POWER
BEST STYLING
BEST INTERIOR
BEST AT GETTING THE HARD WORK DONE RIGHT
RAM DIESEL HEAVY DUTY

Did I ever tell ya why I like the offset steering column in my truck?

So the Ford was virtually identical in all performance measures, even though it weighs more and is physically larger in every dimension.

Looks to me that the judges thought the GM was pretty crappy but it won because of tenths of a second here and there? Ford won this hands down.

Oh look the whining Ford girls have to change their usernames to make themselves feel better about losing...whats new

you can special order a 2018 F-150 with 3260 lb payload and 14,700 lbs towing
you won't find one on dealers lots

@ ecoboost
Your full of sh*t!
You have officially overdosed on the Ford kool-aid

Looks to me that the judges thought the GM was pretty crappy but it won because of tenths of a second here and there? Ford won this hands down.


Posted by: GMSRGREAT | Jul 30, 2018 11:34:47 PM

I guess the braindead pu55y posting as GMSRGREAT didn't read the article.

"When towing over the road, the rear suspension got into a weird resonance wave where the trailer was pushing and pulling the Super Duty," Williams said. "It got bad enough to where I had to let off the throttle and coast a bit to let all the weight recalibrate." Barnes experienced a similar issue while towing up a moderate grade. "The Ford towed well overall but had a serious fore-and-aft frequency issue that was started by certain bumps and would keep getting worse unless the throttle was released."

"Poor braking stability: When we switched off the trailer brakes, the Ford F-350 did not inspire confidence in our closed-course 40-to-zero-mph emergency panic stop testing. Drivers experienced a lot of lateral movement and loss of composure.

Uncomfortable seats: Ford's pickup seats continue to disappoint. "The seat-bottom cushions feel short, or maybe it's the seatback that pushes me too far forward," Bragman said. "Either way, I feel like I'm sitting on the edge of the seats in the Ford."

Ford didn't win jack squat. This test was a real embarrassment for Ford and its fanboys.

@ Jack: Your comment is ridiculous.

Ford has won many diesel comparisons in recent years. Last year, your lemon Chevy got baked in the 3/4 ton challenge. Couldn't even finish the drag strip testing because of a breakdown.

Since none of the judges subjectively picked the Chevy as a favorite in this test--which is troubling to me, you are basically hanging your hat on tenths of a second on a drag strip. It's a smaller, lighter truck with a lower axle ratio. BIG DEAL.

Lets see how these trucks do loaded to the max weight.

Surely .3 tenths will never lure the buyer into it, so it's moot as they'll spend their $75K and something more refined.

HAHAHAHAHA...THE MAGIC FORD FAIRY DUST FAILS AGAIN. AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

MY YOUNGER BROTHER CHINGON LOVES FORD BUT HE IS AN IDI@T AND IS THE BLACK SHEEP OF THE FAMILY. NO WONDER HIS WIFE LEFT HIM FOR A BETTER AND SMARTER MAN.

HAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHA

So if you are towing. The Ram wins hands down.
There wasn't any portion of the testing that was comparable.
The Chevy was the lightest by far. Heck it was a shortbed and 18 inches shorter.

It had 3.73 gears for acceleration. And not necessarily worse fuel milage. These are heavy trucks that are not going to constanstainly stay in overdrive. The higher the rear gear number the more it's going to shift. When it's out of overdrive it's going to use more fuel. You cant force any of these trucks to stay in a particular gear.

Next time find out more about torgue management. Nobody drag races these trucks if they perform at good speeds but 0 to 60 speeds are slower than others. It is meaningless if they are slower because of torgue management. We need to know 30 to 60 mph speeds. That's what counts when entering a freeway.

Are these the only gears available?
If not the test should not have been done.

Without question the Ram towed better and was the favorite. What else are these trucks for?

Ford has won many diesel comparisons in recent years. Last year, your lemon Chevy got baked in the 3/4 ton challenge. Couldn't even finish the drag strip testing because of a breakdown.
Posted by: redbloodedxy | Jul 31, 2018 7:41:30 AM

http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2017/05/2017-34-ton-premium-truck-challenge-track-testing.html

LOL what? The Duramax won and didn't break down.

----------------------------
Since none of the judges subjectively picked the Chevy as a favorite in this test--which is troubling to me, you are basically hanging your hat on tenths of a second on a drag strip. It's a smaller, lighter truck with a lower axle ratio. BIG DEAL.

Posted by: redbloodedxy | Jul 31, 2018 7:41:30 AM

Except that they didn't just chose the Chevy for those "tenths of a second". Did you even read the criticisms for the F-350? The suspension tuning was TERRIBLE. Expansion joints would cause the truck to become unsettled and they'd have to let off the throttle to let the truck re-settle. They went so far as to say that the F-350 "felt like it was most affected by the load behind it."

You can throw a tantrum if you want but Ford needs to go back to the drawing board on this truck's suspension setup.

----------------------------

It's a smaller, lighter truck with a lower axle ratio. BIG DEAL.

Posted by: redbloodedxy | Jul 31, 2018 7:41:30 AM

It's nobody's fault but Ford's for only offering a 3.55's and 3.31's on the 2018 Super Duty diesels. Go whine to them.

I see nothing but bitching and excuses. This is a test where they were provided by Ford, GM, and Dodge a vehicle. If Ford, GM, or Dodge wanted to provide a better vehicle they would have. People need to act like a damned adult and stop treating these tests like watching their favorite football team play. I am a GM fan and still like to read an watch video's for all tests. I appreciate all brands. Thank you PickupTrucks.com for doing this test. I appreciate testing of this type and no matter who won I would be happy with the test. We are at a time where these things make more SAE Net HP than most every famous muscle car made in Gross HP. I see that as cool and want to read testing with them.

Just curious about if there is any influence in the way that you request trucks from the manufacturer. I know they are from the standard press fleet, but in this scenario it seems like the dealer installed trailering camera system on the Chevrolet would have been a fair requested "add on" to level the field's price and feature content. There may be other "dealer option" packages from other brands, but this seemed the most relevant example of items which may be left off since a) it is unlikely that press trucks, even HDs, are actually going to spend any appreciable time towing and b) they are dealer/customer installed rather than factory installed.

Mike Jones: I'm not "throwing a tantrum", I'm questioning the test itself. Makes no sense to me. There were recent towing comparisons where the Ford performed perfectly and was not affected adversely by the trailer. I get that Ford doesn't offer 3.73 gears in the SRW truck, I'm just stating the lower ratio has an advantage on the strip.

Considering The Ford was pulling a trailer 7000 lbs. below it's towing capacity in never did a very good job.

@ redblood
The strip? The PowerJoke has never outperformed the Duramax on one of these tests. Last year it had a 4.10 vs the Chevys 3.73 and it didn't matter.

"Looks to me that the judges thought the GM was pretty crappy but it won because of tenths of a second here and there? Ford won this hands down."

--- No, it wouldn't. Had it not been for those performance numbers, RAM would have won as the most stable and confident truck of the bunch. RAM only lost because it had 80 fewer horses than the other two.

RAM only lost because it had 80 fewer horses than the other two.
Posted by: Vulpine | Aug 1, 2018

@Vulpine

Since most people don't buy a 1-ton truck for drag racing the minor differences in 0-60 times or total HP is zilch. The Chevy narrowly won on engine performance, and the RAM clearly won on subjective factors.

Here's another area where RAM wins. Go to a Dodge dealership and negotiate a touch deal on a HD RAM. You'll be amazed. One of my friends did last summer and kicked butt. He had to drive to S. Carolina to pick up his new truck but he turned it into a beach getaway with his wife, so it's all good. RAM has great value, great drivetrain and terrific comfort convenience.

edit: Go to a Dodge dealership and negotiate a TOUCH deal.

Make that a TOUGH deal please.

The Chevy won and it was because of the Ram air hood, unfair advantage.

"Insufficient information","Awkward cabin layout","Mediocre cameras", "The DEF system needs work on every part — the fill location under the hood is the worst in the industry, the DEF tank's low position is the worst in the industry and the in-dash DEF gauge itself is the worst in the industry." As noted earlier, it has two positions: "enough" and "refill immediately.","Lackluster storage"........

This truck won? Because it is faster by a tenth? Woah. Great test......

The fact that u roll out sales, is idiocrocy, bc ford has more loyal followers or believers in Ford lies propaganda than anyone else. its like a mini cult...

Posted by: TNTGMC | Jul 30, 2018 3:49:02 PM

Or maybe people just think it's a better truck overall? Look at these test results. The Chevy and Ford were a virtual tie. The Ram has the best interior, followed by the Ford. Our work used to swear by the Duramax after some forgettable 6.0 Powerstroke trucks. In the long run the GM trucks actually cost the company more to own because every year they needed big money for safety inspections. The front ends just didn't take the pounding. We are now back to a 50/50 mix of Ram's and F-350 trucks.

@rammin,

Whao, be careful their bud, the GMshills will call you naive and or inexperienced.

I wouldn't waste my time responding to anything that person is posting.

Trust me.

I think that can be said for all three. About 80% of our work fleet is all Duramax. Very similar to your comment, we used to be mostly Ford but their Diesels just didn't perform very well so we switched to mostly GM a couple years ago. We bought three new one-ton dually Fords last year and one of them needed a new rear end replaced before it was a year old. You can't go wrong with the Allison/Duramax combo

@ Frank
Insecure and Naive??
Obviously
Thanks

@Jim,

That one made you look bad.

You’re welcome Bud

Lol Frank
I think Jim has you figured out, but that's easy after reading one of your comments.

I have heard of too many problems.

Learn how to restore car batteries to like new condition. Watch this video http://rurl.us/3SNna

I regret not buying a 1st gen dodge Cummins truck when I had the chance!

I liked the test drive with the 5 spd manual.

If it had a pickup bed on it, I might have bought it!

Now I wonder if the Ram 2500 or 3500 will be a good truck.

Learn how to restore car batteries to brand new condition visit https://restorbatterys.blogspot.com

All of the one tòns had a tow capacity less then 24000 pounds. Which shocks me. I plan to buy a 44 ft 5th wheel RV its max weight of 24000 pounds . I see them being towed all the time by 3500 one tons how is this posible



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