Which Blind Spot Warning Systems Incorporate Trailers?

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Blind spot warning systems are among the most in-demand safety technologies among new vehicle buyers, according to Nissan, and they are especially useful on large, long pickups that sit high and have large blind spots. Blind spot warning sensors look at a box that starts near the rear bumper and extends backward a few car lengths. The systems alert you when vehicles in other lanes enter your blind spot and are useful in preventing accidents related to lane changing. However, adding a trailer to the bumper renders the systems useless — unless those systems are updated to accommodate trailers.

Since towing is one of the most popular uses for pickup trucks — 60 percent of participants in a recent Chevrolet survey said that towing is a "key consideration in their next pickup purchase" — some truckmakers have taken note and created new blind spot warning systems that account for trailers.

Out of the six current full-size half-ton pickups — the Chevrolet Silverado 1500, Ford F-150, GMC Sierra 1500, Nissan Titan, Ram 1500 and Toyota Tundra — only two have blind spot warning systems that adjust for a trailer. Which ones? The redesigned Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150. The other manufacturers recommend that you shut off the blind spot warning system, if your truck is equipped with it, while towing to prevent a litany of false warnings. The redesigned 2019 Silverado 1500 and the 2019 Sierra 1500 offer a slew of new towing safety features, but they do not include a blind spot warning system that sees the trailer and what's next to it.

The Ford F-150 and the Ram 1500 take slightly different approaches to this safety feature. Here are the specifics:

 

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Though the Ram prompted us to look at blind spot warning with trailer coverage, the 2017 Ford F-150 was the first to offer it in this class. That means it's possible to find used F-150s with the feature.

Ford's system supports only conventional bumper-pull trailers, meaning it doesn't work with fifth-wheel or gooseneck trailers. If you connect a fifth-wheel or gooseneck trailer, the blind spot warning system automatically shuts off. Ford's system allows owners to use the steering wheel controls and the instrument panel screen to select the type of trailer, whether they want to adjust the blind spot system (selecting no turns it completely off) and the length of the trailer in 3-foot increments up to 33 feet. This information can be saved in individual trailer profiles so you don't have to enter it each time you use a particular trailer. The system works at speeds down to and more than 5 mph.

We should also note that any time a trailer is connected to the plug, the F-150's rear cross-traffic alerts automatically turn off. And if a trailer length is not provided, the blind spot warning system will shut off as well.

 

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Ram added a blind spot monitor for trailers during its redesign of the 2019 half ton. It has one big difference from the Ford setup: This system can auto-detect the length of the trailer with just a few quick S turns. Ram says that in automatic mode, the system will use the blind spot sensors to detect the length of the trailer during a single 90-degree turn and once it starts going more than 6 mph. If the system can't determine the exact length of the trailer, it will default to the maximum length setting (almost 40 feet) until it does make a determination.

In addition to the length detection setting, there's also a manual setting to just leave the blind spot system at maximum length. These settings can be toggled in the Ram 1500's infotainment screen in the center console.

After spending time using both brands' blind spot monitoring systems, we don't think Ram's system is quite as granular as Ford's. Ram's system simply categorizes the trailer into one of four categories, basically in 10-foot increments up to a maximum length of 39.5 feet (which as far as length goes, beats the Ford by more than 6 feet). The Ford system can set trailer length in 3-foot increments.

The flexibility provided by this feature gives Ram and Ford a leg up on the competition since towing safely is a big selling point for many consumers and being able to merge safely is an area of concern.

Cars.com photos by Mark Williams and Brian Wong

 

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Comments

Ford really needs this feature since it needs to pull a long trailer with another spare Ford for when the first Ford breaks down.

You know I'm right.

It wakes up the Ford owner that their tow truck has arrived

Government Motors dropped the ball again

Another useless reason driving up costs and weight of trucks!

Learn how to drive and pay attention eliminates this useless 1984 devices!

Makes you wonder how humanity survived all these centuries without Ford’s nanny devices...

I can't stand parking sensors, blind spot warnings, lane departure, traction control, abs in most situations and other useless systems.. as previously stated ... If you need them... You shouldn't be driving... Probably several thousand dollars in nanny state warning devises on trucks now.. the next warning device will be an alert when you start your truck that says, " this vehie is not as efficient as a small car and if you aren't towing or hauling you should choose a more efficient means of transportation"

GM came out with this nanny device first in 2014. Too bad GM still can't get it work with a trailer hooked up.

GM sucks

Chris and Frank, you mean Ford didn’t come up with it first? You mean Ford didn’t lead the way in introducing the technology? You’ve got to be kidding!

MS13, Nice flip flop avoidance, doofus.

Per the article, still to this day, the GM trucks don’t have it for incorporating trailers.

“ The other manufacturers recommend that you shut off the blind spot warning system, if your truck is equipped with it, while towing to prevent a litany of false warnings. The redesigned 2019 Silverado 1500 and the 2019 Sierra 1500 offer a slew of new towing safety features, but they do not include a blind spot warning system that sees the trailer and what's next to it. “

Per the article.

" Ford's system supports only conventional bumper-pull trailers, meaning it doesn't work with fifth-wheel or gooseneck trailers. If you connect a fifth-wheel or gooseneck trailer, the blind spot warning system automatically shuts off. "

Ford sucks. Hahaha.

Ford Motor Company
NYSE: F

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Hahaha!!

Ford owners love riding (with) their nannies.

Just the truth, there’s no avoidance at all. Look back at other threads and see, I don’t drive a Ford, GM or FCA product. When you big three fanboys go after each other, I don’t have a dog in that fight. I don’t get into that pi$$ing contest. But it is occasionally entertaining to watch the real doofuses “flip flop”.

Wait until they have to buy a replacement taillamp. $$$$$$

I carry a spare taillight with me and a gallon of gas in case I need a splash. You never know when you'll need it and it never hurts to be prepared.

we don't think Ram's system is quite as granular as Ford's. "
And thats your opinon. With all the other class exclusive features on the Ram like coil springs and auto level it's head and shoulders above fords leaf springs and sagging rear end.

Look NO further than your own testing who came out on top with a 1,000lbs in the bed. RAM. Comfort and control while towing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXcaPcvVVB4

GUTS
GLORY
CLASS LEADING
RAM

All these baby monitors on vehicles in case your feelings get hurt while driving.

Can you see the mini screen in the Ford?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_vJh5jheaY

I don't want a blind spot monitoring computer system. Waste of money.

Hemi
I believe it was 2009 dodge paid GM a very large amount of money to use their five link coil suspension on the 2010 Ram they also made a deal to use the technology that shuts down the v8 from 8 cylinders to 4 and back to 8. It's the same suspension that's used on the Tahoe, suburban, yukons,Avalanche and Escalade
I think that's when Chrysler changed their trucks from dodge to ram

Anyone interested in doing a group buy on taillamps? Join us in the GM forums! Our Silverado taillamps keep breaking. $$$$$

I'm glad you guys are doing a taillamp group buy. I have to replace my taillamps every year. Let's save some $$$$

Hey guys, I just checked my taillamps on my Sierra, and they are cracking again. I need to order some more.

Yep. Time to stock up on Silverado taillamps my fellow GM compatriots.

As a side note, Please remember to get out and vote. Make sure to support the republican party in all of our races.

Hemi
I believe it was 2009 dodge paid GM a very large amount of money to use their five link coil suspension on the 2010 Ram they also made a deal to use the technology that shuts down the v8 from 8 cylinders to 4 and back to 8. It's the same suspension that's used on the Tahoe, suburban, yukons,Avalanche and Escalade
I think that's when Chrysler changed their trucks from dodge to ram


Posted by: Gilbert Gonzales | Oct 28, 2018 3:30:17 PM

Sure, Can you show me?

Gilbert Gonzales | Oct 28, 2018 3:30:17 PM

Their was a time when Dodge/ RAM was the sole supplier of full size transfer cases and manual transmissions. New Process Gear. Then G.M. had property in Detroit so they partnered with Chrysler to manufacter drive train. New Process Gear.

@Republican party, only a bafoon would vote for anyone on the republican ticket.

@ Chris,

Only a bafoon would vote for the liberals that shoot up Republican softball games!

@papajum aka Republic an party--Vote for Dems to end the atmosphere of political violence.

Vote for Dems to end the unprescedented corruption going on.

Vote for Dems because the Truumpster is willingly putting Americans in harm's way because he has dismissed a major United Nations report on global climate change.

I thought this was a truck forum.

The FAKE Jeff S

Hemi
I'm going to go back to 2008 see what I can find and post it on a future topic. My friend who showed me the article bought a 2009
Ram in 2008 after reading the article. He reminded me that the first time he brought his new Ram over he backed up in the driveway so we could compare it to my wife's Tahoe and my Avalanche 5 link coil suspension all three looked identical.
Hemi we'll get back to you on a future topic. Chrysler and GM have partnered together many times. I do recall your last post.

The fake Chris

Personally I'm not a big fan of BSW systems. I find them expensive, annoying and with the advent of large multi angle/style side view mirrors unnecessary. That being said it appears that many are craving this latest cost raising electro nanny and to not have/offer it looks "bad" by todays marketing standards regardless of the extent of its actual usefulness. While its shocking GM didn't incorporate it into their all new full sizes a retrofit will be quickly and easily done. I very much doubt GM will take as long to incorporate BWS on their new trucks as they did with things like rear disc brakes, galvanized body panels, modern body materials, DOHC, Variable timing, multivalve engines, turbos, upfitter switches, integrated trailer brake control, tail gate step, and IFS to name a few.

Ford and Ram have the BSM module in the tail lamp, and Toyota and 2019 GM trucks have it in the bumper corners.

I have never needed BSM while towing a trailer, typically the truck mirrors are further out than the trailer

“ GM's franchise pickup truck is the most disappointing "all-new" vehicle I've driven this year. Aside from the utter face-plant of its styling, this Silverado reeks of cost-cutting and profit-padding “

http://www.thedrive.com/new-cars/24472/2019-chevy-silverado-test-drive-review-gms-new-full-size-pickup-truck-is-an-all-around-letdown



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